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tenOC
06-30-2011, 09:54 PM
Is it a post war? Who made it for which?

TIA.

J.R.2009
07-01-2011, 06:29 AM
Walt Arsenal MFG. , I think was the name. It was post war and a replacement hammer. I have one that came with my NPM. Can show up in any makers carbine.

BQ97
07-01-2011, 08:51 AM
Walt Manufacturing Company, they were made during WWII.

tenOC
07-01-2011, 09:11 AM
That would 'splain why it would be a (known to be) CMP rifle.

Bill Ricca
07-01-2011, 03:59 PM
One of the myths is if it was not produced by a Carbine manufacturer, it was post war. That is totally wrong. The bulk of spare parts were made during WWII.

One thing to look for is markings. Except for bands, barrels, bolts, slides, and a few other parts which require markings during production, mostly all of the post war production had no marks on the parts. The reason almost everything was marked during WWII was due to the fact that there was probably 10-20 different makers of the same item.

If you see a marking 99% of the time it was WWII manufactured. (Another exception is some of the SA and RIA production).

NaughtyMonkey
07-02-2011, 06:26 AM
Walt Arsenal MFG. , I think was the name. It was post war and a replacement hammer. I have one that came with my NPM. Can show up in any makers carbine.

Weird my NPM came with a WA hammer too from the CMP.

J.R.2009
07-02-2011, 06:56 AM
Yeah, kinda' strange I guess. Thanks to Bill R. we all went to school. I didn't know ALL parts ( or was it just hammers, I didn't take notes in class :) ) with stamped letters were WWII parts. Live and learn. I assume that a WA hammer would be more or less "right" for any maker of carbine since it was a rebuild/replacement part.
I feel better about the one of two carbines with rebuild hammers in them.
Thanks again Bill.

Bill Ricca
07-02-2011, 12:35 PM
J.R.2009, I did not mean to offend you. My concern is that "post war" statement was on mostly everything in one of the published books. It was big error, which has been going on for many years. I do not know if he has changed it in his latest version.

"If a carbine maker did not make it, it has to be post war, because they were producing spares", is the myth that got everybody thinking that way.

As production was planned around 7,000,000, spare parts (and later versions for upgrade) were being made in extremely large contracts by the lowest bidders (which sometimes were the sub contractors for the carbine makers). It was all happening circa late 1943 till the end of the war and extended into 1946.

Except for circa 1947-49 RIA, production of spares was over. By the Korean war just the main items like bands, barrels, bolts, stocks, (and expendables which was always changed like pins, springs, screws) there was almost no Ordnance production of carbine parts until the Vietnam War was in process. There was a M2 mag catch made in 1952-53, but that was due to the need to upgrade. There may have been a couple of other items, but I have not found any yet.

I have a couple of exceptions like an oiler in 1957 and SA cast recoil plates in 1963.

In summary: Most spares were produced during WWII, with the exceptions of SA, RIA, and the main items like stocks, bolts, barrels, etc. There was such a high quantity in stock, that almost nothing was produced again until the mid 1960's. Pins, springs, and screws were produced throughout all time periods.

J.R.2009
07-02-2011, 03:35 PM
Bill, no offense taken. I am serious when I say "I went to school" after seeing one of your post. I depend on you and guys like BQ, Tuna, AJ, and a host of others to correct and inform me.
Hell, son, you have corrected and taught me lord knows how many times. I stick my neck out pretty often trying to help others knowing I will be corrected by one of you guys if I'm wrong. If I am wrong, I've been taught when corrected.

Shucks, if I didn't like and respect ya, I wouldn't be buying stuff from ya. :D

tenOC
07-02-2011, 04:12 PM
The good thing about making an honest mistake in posting is that can draw out even more information about the history. Thank you. I'll try to remember what's been posted by the historians and pass it on.
You're an honest guy J.R..

NaughtyMonkey
07-02-2011, 04:58 PM
The good thing about making an honest mistake in posting is that can draw out even more information about the history. Thank you. I'll try to remember what's been posted by the historians and pass it on.
You're an honest guy J.R..

When ever I learn a new fact I write it down. I have tons of notes.

Also during the post war "upgrade" stages I bet hundreds, maybe even thousands of parts were trashed and were replaced with parts such as the "WA" hammers.

My question is that these parts were not sent to a single contractor, were they sent to the armorers in the front lines? The repair depots, etc?

BQ97
07-02-2011, 06:44 PM
My question is that these parts were not sent to a single contractor, were they sent to the armorers in the front lines? The repair depots, etc?

Spare parts, regardless of manufacturer, were placed into the logistics system and could be requisitioned by those that needed them and were authorized to receive such items.