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View Full Version : Scariest thing I have ever witnessed at the range


gtojohnl
03-11-2012, 08:22 PM
A guy at the range today was shooting an 7.7 Arisaka. I'm not exactly sure what happened but it appeared he was shooting reloads. The round before the one that blew it up appeared to have lodged itself in the barrel. Not enough powder or the primer only. Anyway the guy has his eyes but he left in an ambulance with a 3 inch cut in his forehead.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y256/meathead69/DSC04329.jpg

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y256/meathead69/DSC04330.jpg

M1Riflenut
03-11-2012, 08:24 PM
Thats some scary schit.

MTC29
03-11-2012, 08:25 PM
I could say a lot of things but instead will only say that I am glad he was not serioulsy injured.

drmsparks
03-11-2012, 09:30 PM
Wow. What range? (just asking cause your in the neighborhood.....)

218bee
03-11-2012, 09:35 PM
Wow....thank God he's OK...I have read that a famous old-time gunsmith deliberately tried to blow up a 7.7 Arisaka and try as he may, couldn't do what happened here in this thread. He then went on to say the Arisaka was one of the strongest actions ever. I'm looking at the pic above and rethinking his statement...

stevekaw
03-11-2012, 09:39 PM
Last attempt by Japanese Empire at revenge for WWII. Glad shooter is apparently OK!

nmckenzie
03-11-2012, 09:47 PM
[QUOTE I have read that a famous old-time gunsmith deliberately tried to blow up a 7.7 Arisaka and try as he may, couldn't do what happened here in this thread. He then went on to say the Arisaka was one of the strongest actions ever. [/QUOTE]

I believe the rifle subjected to these tests by both the US military and NRA was the 6.5x50mm Type 38.

skeet41
03-11-2012, 10:30 PM
I'm glad he wasn't killed. Before you start seating bullets, take a flashlight and check every round in the loading block to make sure every round has powder and all are at the same level in the case. Off my soap box but be safe.

GeraldG
03-11-2012, 10:53 PM
He's very lucky to have kept his eyes. That's why you should always pay attention if a round sounds a little (or a lot) different that the rest have, or has noticeably less (or no) recoil, and....maybe there's no new hole in the target.......and don't fire any more until you have made sure the bore is clear of obstructions. A squib round can be a life-threatening event if it's not detected.

buttebob
03-11-2012, 11:30 PM
P.O. Ackley ran tests on Mauser, Springfield, Enfield P-14, and No. 1 MkIII, Krag and Arisaka M38 and M99. He rebarreled with bull barrels and chambered to 270 Ackley Magnum and 30-40 Ackley Improved.
He kept loading hotter and hotter until the guns blew. Only the Arisaka M38 survived. The 1 3/16" barrel on the M38 blew off, but the action was still serviceable. The M99 was the second strongest. IIRC the pressure was 100,000 lbs/sq. in.
About the same time the NRA received an Arisaka M38 that was sent to them by a gentleman that had rechambered it to 30-06. He complained that he killed his deer for the last 3 years, but that the gun recoiled too much. Upon examination it was found that he had rechambered it to 30-06 but the barrel was still 6.5mm. I can't remember what pressure the NRA reported, but I remember seeing the bullets after they were fired through the barrel. They were very, very long!

GeraldG
03-11-2012, 11:38 PM
P.O. Ackley ran tests on Mauser, Springfield, Enfield P-14, and No. 1 MkIII, Krag and Arisaka M38 and M99. He rebarreled with bull barrels and chambered to 270 Ackley Magnum and 30-40 Ackley Improved.
He kept loading hotter and hotter until the guns blew. Only the Arisaka M38 survived. The 1 3/16" barrel on the M38 blew off, but the action was still serviceable. The M99 was the second strongest. IIRC the pressure was 100,000 lbs/sq. in.
About the same time the NRA received an Arisaka M38 that was sent to them by a gentleman that had rechambered it to 30-06. He complained that he killed his deer for the last 3 years, but that the gun recoiled too much. Upon examination it was found that he had rechambered it to 30-06 but the barrel was still 6.5mm. I can't remember what pressure the NRA reported, but I remember seeing the bullets after they were fired through the barrel. They were very, very long!

:eek::eek:

drywash
03-11-2012, 11:40 PM
As Skeet said, I also keep a flashlight handy to check cases in my loading block. I also use a checklist that lists my steps and check em off. I just finished tubbling, check it off, resize, check it off, trim cases, check it off, clean uniform primer pockets, camfer, bevel case throats, check em off. I stopped and left a not: Next session seat primers. I don't trust my memory anymore so I use checklist each and every time. Glad the guy didn't lose eyesight or limbs, fingers. Lucky Guy.

horticattleman
03-12-2012, 09:13 AM
Dang Japs still drawing American blood.

Doubs43
03-12-2012, 09:46 AM
About the same time the NRA received an Arisaka M38 that was sent to them by a gentleman that had rechambered it to 30-06. He complained that he killed his deer for the last 3 years, but that the gun recoiled too much. Upon examination it was found that he had rechambered it to 30-06 but the barrel was still 6.5mm. I can't remember what pressure the NRA reported, but I remember seeing the bullets after they were fired through the barrel. They were very, very long!

I remember that article in the American Rifleman... about 1960, give or take a few. They fired it remotely and were amazed that there was zero damage to the rifle.

JimF
03-12-2012, 09:59 AM
I remember that article in the American Rifleman... about 1960, give or take a few. They fired it remotely and were amazed that there was zero damage to the rifle.

Yup . . . . .May, 1959, page 52 . . . .

The various .30 cal. bullets fired through the 6.5mm bore were photographed on 1/4" graph paper . . . .

The U.S. service .30 cal. 172 grain bullet grew ALMOST a QUARTER-INCH in length after traveling through the 6.5 bore!

Just another example of why we NEED gun control . . . . some people should NOT be allowed anywhere NEAR a gun! --Jim

ceresco
03-12-2012, 10:09 AM
Interesting--Keep flipping back to the part where 7.7mm cases made from 30-06 swell .004-.008" at the web to fill the 7.7mm chamber. Barrel appears intact--looks like a case head failure and escaping gas to me. Good Shooting.....

renovate7
03-12-2012, 10:12 AM
On the Japanese collector board there has been more than one report of sabatoged rifles. The Japanese drilled holes thru the receivers etc. below the wood line. It would be interesting to know if this was the first time the rifle had been fired.

milprileb
03-12-2012, 11:00 AM
Lots of Arisaka were rechambered during the 50's and many never had barrels marked as such.

It is wise to check these surplus rifles carefully to determine if they are in original caliber and safe to shoot.

DaveHH
03-12-2012, 12:55 PM
one of my friends had a Type 38 6.5 that he claimed was made by Beretta. It was just a beautiful rifle finely finished like a commercial Mauser. It was in showroom new condition and shot really well. That 6.5 is THE caliber in these rifles. Is that correct? Did Beretta actually make any Arisakas?

nmckenzie
03-12-2012, 02:26 PM
one of my friends had a Type 38 6.5 that he claimed was made by Beretta. It was just a beautiful rifle finely finished like a commercial Mauser. It was in showroom new condition and shot really well. That 6.5 is THE caliber in these rifles. Is that correct? Did Beretta actually make any Arisakas?

Most likely it's a Type I made by the Italians in 6.5x50 for Japan during the late '30s. If memory serves me it's essentially a Carcano action with a Mauser style box magazine.

HughUno
03-12-2012, 03:15 PM
The 99 Arisaka action is brutally strong also (even late war) but... (exactly) NOTHING will survive a bore obstruction.

nmckenzie
03-12-2012, 03:43 PM
Lots of Arisaka were rechambered during the 50's and many never had barrels marked as such.

It is wise to check these surplus rifles carefully to determine if they are in original caliber and safe to shoot.

I remember being shown a Type 99 that had been rechambered to 30'06 in Japan during the early '50s, probably at the beginning of the Korean War. Can't recall whether the cartridge designation was stamped on the receiver ring or chamber area, but it was prominently stamped. What purpose these rifles were intended to serve I don't know.

twh1997
03-12-2012, 06:55 PM
There are some legitimate .30 calibre conversions that were done for the Japanese IDF around the begining of the Koren war. I believe that they were an interim step until they were rearmed with US military equipement.

gtojohnl
03-12-2012, 09:07 PM
This was a private range in Harford County.

Big Ed
03-12-2012, 09:28 PM
I shoot many type 38's and 99's have about 40 99's in my collection. I use resized 30.06 cases. I've even shot the late war rifles aswell. Never had a problem. I learned a long time ago. If you get that "off" sounding shot with little or no recoil you better stop and look down the barrel. Don't fault the Japanese rifle or any other curio or modern firearm. If you plug the barrel ANY firearm will self destruct. There was just a video here or a young girl firing an M1 7th round was a puff. 8th round destroyed the rifle. I guess the m1 can't take a bore obstruction either?

Blood_of_Tyrants
03-12-2012, 09:28 PM
[QUOTE I have read that a famous old-time gunsmith deliberately tried to blow up a 7.7 Arisaka and try as he may, couldn't do what happened here in this thread. He then went on to say the Arisaka was one of the strongest actions ever.

I believe the rifle subjected to these tests by both the US military and NRA was the 6.5x50mm Type 38.[/QUOTE]

Mythbusters tried to blow up a 6.5 Carcano by obstructing and then welding a plug in the barrel. The most they got was a slight bulge near the muzzle.

Wineman
03-12-2012, 11:05 PM
Weakest part of any rifle is the brass case. If it survives you will not generally see the kind of damage shown here. The 6.5x50 is a semi rim and that may give more chamber around the head of the cartridge hence the good showing in PO's tests.

Because of the way the 1903 Springfield was built, it left a good bit of brass showing. The help came in the form of the "Hatcher Hole" to vent gas out and not let it back into the action. When that gas has a place to push with extra square inches, bad things happen. The same principle is the ACE 22 LR conversions for the 1911. The chamber lets some of the gas from the 22 out to push on the more surface area and it is able to cycle a much heavier mechanism.

I picked up a bunch of scroungy, dirty (real dirt that is) range brass the other day. After reflection, a few dollars of brass is not worth my rifle, or my body parts, so into the scrap bucket it went.

Be safe.

Wineman

jgerlica45Guy
03-12-2012, 11:19 PM
Does the OP have pictures of the barrel showing a bulge that would indicate a bore obstruction? Otherwise my money is on a questionable reload. Judging by the condition of the receiver, it doesn't appear to be a mettalurgical/heat treat issue, as it peeled intact rather than shattering like a low number '03. I've seen case failures before, but they entailed a blown extractor and magazine floorplate, never 1/2 of the receiver ring taking leave. My money is riding on a serious oops in the reloading process.

GeraldG
03-12-2012, 11:45 PM
Does the OP have pictures of the barrel showing a bulge that would indicate a bore obstruction? Otherwise my money is on a questionable reload. Judging by the condition of the receiver, it doesn't appear to be a mettalurgical/heat treat issue, as it peeled intact rather than shattering like a low number '03. I've seen case failures before, but they entailed a blown extractor and magazine floorplate, never 1/2 of the receiver ring taking leave. My money is riding on a serious oops in the reloading process.

The damage to that receiver looks to me remarkably like the damage I saw once to a Remington 700 .308 after firing a reload charged to near case capacity with H110.

jgerlica45Guy
03-13-2012, 12:05 AM
The damage to that receiver looks to me remarkably like the damage I saw once to a Remington 700 .308 after firing a reload charged to near case capacity with H110.

That is exactly why I have two seperate presses. I already keep things boringly simple, basically IMR 4895 jacketed, and 4227 for cast but the cost of a little lee single stage for cast loading was well worth it in streamlining the process and helping to eliminate a possible oops. Dropping 34 grains of 4895 may be good to go, the same of 4227 not so much.

MLHSR
03-18-2012, 08:16 PM
http://i435.photobucket.com/albums/qq79/martyh-18/DSCN3184.jpg

MLHSR
03-18-2012, 08:17 PM
http://i435.photobucket.com/albums/qq79/martyh-18/DSCN3183.jpg

m1garand1055
03-18-2012, 10:15 PM
http://i435.photobucket.com/albums/qq79/martyh-18/DSCN3184.jpg
If I recall , I was told by one of our board members that that 1917 Enfield blew up because of an obstruction of Snow in the barrel over on Brush Mountain back in the forties.That is one of the two Blowed up rifles in our Club House on the wall.:eek: