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-   -   Planes, planes, planes!!! (http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=191805)

Mike in Wis. 07-25-2016 05:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J.R.2009 (Post 1496690)
My first duty assignment was the 379th Bomb Wing base in a small Michigan town named Oscoda. A sleepy little town except when the B-52's were scrambled or B-58 flew simulated low level attacks on the base. It seems that on one of the runs they flew very low over a Mink farm causing mass suicide for the excited little "coats to be". That route was removed for future attacks

The "good old days" .... you must be familiar with Duluth,MN as well having been at Wurtsmith, KI Sawyer too I imagine. One of the funny stories was when the 148th TAC Recon got their new mission and the RF-4C (mostly 1966 models). They played a lot over the lake in a flight area called "Snoopy" IIRC. After a couple years they got the word to ditch the grey paint scheme and go to camouflage all over top and bottom. It wasn't a couple days later that a couple wags decided to hot rod a bit at low level over the lake (Superior)... two aircraft returned with the paint blown off the lower tail surfaces. Apparently water spray kicking up at unauthorized altitudes can be abrasive :-)

J.R.2009 07-25-2016 05:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mike in Wis. (Post 1496906)
The "good old days" .... you must be familiar with Duluth,MN as well having been at Wurtsmith, KI Sawyer too I imagine. One of the funny stories was when the 148th TAC Recon got their new mission and the RF-4C (mostly 1966 models). They played a lot over the lake in a flight area called "Snoopy" IIRC. After a couple years they got the word to ditch the grey paint scheme and go to camouflage all over top and bottom. It wasn't a couple days later that a couple wags decided to hot rod a bit at low level over the lake (Superior)... two aircraft returned with the paint blown off the lower tail surfaces. Apparently water spray kicking up at unauthorized altitudes can be abrasive :-)

Oh yeah, I remember lots of stories. I can't recall where the B-58's were based when they came "a-callin" but it was a hell of a show. I do recall the entire base turning out at dusk to see 4 of them take off. They didn't need the whole of the 10,000' runway, so, when the came down the strip toward Lake Huron they were still on the ground, rotated with the blue flame hitting the runway and taking off at an angle the B-52's could only dream of .. OMG! What a show!!:GS:

grumpa72 07-25-2016 08:35 PM

J.R. & Mike,

Just curious what your age is?. I am 65 and recently retired from the airlines but retired from the AF in 1999. Many of my memories are the transition type. For instance, in the mid to late 80s I flew in to Little Rock AR and as we passed the ILS (Instrument Landing System) marker I told the copilot to listen to the identifying audio marker and tell me when it switched from "A" to "N". Huh? Was the reply. FYI Google AN navigation marker if this foreign to you. I retired from the airline with GPS and Autoland capabilities that would have boggled my mind when I entered the AF in 69.
Time flies by!

J.R.2009 07-26-2016 04:42 AM

LOL, I remember 65!!! Years old that is. I'll be 74 next month. I'll Goggle that thing about AN Nav.

grumpa72 07-26-2016 05:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J.R.2009 (Post 1497058)
LOL, I remember 65!!! Years old that is. I'll be 74 next month. I'll Goggle that thing about AN Nav.

An "A-N" beacon was an early radio beacon that told pilots, when flying an instrument approach, that they were nearing the runway. It worked on the principal that A in Morse code is "dot dash" and N is " dash dot". When you were on the far side of the beacon, approaching the runway, you would here continuous"dot dash, dot dash", A. As you got over the beacon, it nulled out and all you heard was the tone, a hum if you will. After that audio null, it switched to "dash dot, dash dot", N. At that aural null, as it was called, you started your stop watch and flew for a certain number of seconds. If you saw the runway you landed. If not you went missed approach. Very crude by today's standards but it worked. I will tell you that the first time I did an Autoland on a zero visibility day I had some concerns. The argument is, if the weather is too bad for me to hand fly, I'll let the airplane do it all the way to touchdown. After you go through a set of procedural setups you let the autopilot do it. A quantum leap from an A-N beacon!

J.R.2009 07-26-2016 07:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by grumpa72 (Post 1497065)
An "A-N" beacon was an early radio beacon that told pilots, when flying an instrument approach, that they were nearing the runway. It worked on the principal that A in Morse code is "dot dash" and N is " dash dot". When you were on the far side of the beacon, approaching the runway, you would here continuous"dot dash, dot dash", A. As you got over the beacon, it nulled out and all you heard was the tone, a hum if you will. After that audio null, it switched to "dash dot, dash dot", N. At that aural null, as it was called, you started your stop watch and flew for a certain number of seconds. If you saw the runway you landed. If not you went missed approach. Very crude by today's standards but it worked. I will tell you that the first time I did an Autoland on a zero visibility day I had some concerns. The argument is, if the weather is too bad for me to hand fly, I'll let the airplane do it all the way to touchdown. After you go through a set of procedural setups you let the autopilot do it. A quantum leap from an A-N beacon!

I KNOW Bob understands this better than I. I remember my Dad talking about this many years ago.

J.R.2009 07-26-2016 08:26 PM

Still waiting for your stories guys!!!

KilroyCD 07-26-2016 10:44 PM

J.R., I'm a little late to the party but I remember many of Wally's aircraft in this thread. For a number of years I did aircraft photography and was a Warbirds judge at Oshkosh. So a number of Wally's birds are quite familiar to me, but I wasn't among those judging his aircraft. I was usually detailed to judge trainers and liaison aircraft. Only occasionally when it was an "all-hands-on-deck" instance was I privileged to judge some of the big iron.
I have many photos that I have yet to scan in, but here are some from "the good ol' days" (as far as I was concerned).
First, here's a photo of Wilson "Connie" Edwards' HU-16 Albatross in Coast Guard colors, and with their blessing as it was in commemorative markings for a Coast Guard's anniversary. The funny thing was the sloop that is in black on the side of the aircraft was painted too low, so when the Albatross was in the water the sloop was sinking.
http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z...nAlbatross.jpg

Next is a close relative of the Strikemaster, the Jet Provost.
http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z...JetProvost.jpg

Here is why I was usually assigned as a judge to trainers, as I frequently helped some friends who restored Fairchild PT-19/23/26 aircraft.
http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z...raft/PT-19.jpg
http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z...raft/PT-23.jpg
http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z...ft/Cornell.jpg

The Wildcat was another favorite, and here's a shot of Lex duPont's FM-2 with Al Sheeves flying a TBM Avenger somewhere over south central Pennsylvania on a hazy day. Being on top of the the haze made it look like we were over water.
http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z...dcatTurkey.jpg

The AT-6 / SNJ was one of my favorite photo planes, but frequently were the photo subjects.

http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z...ngVertical.jpg
http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z...rcraft/SNJ.jpg

But being a Spitfire enthusiast and historian, I took mild umbrage to the disparaging remarks about the build quality of the Spitfire. They were actually quite well built.
http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z...raft/TE308.jpg
http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z...aft/TE308b.jpg
http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z...ft/MT719-1.jpg
http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z...aft/2Spits.jpg

All of those photos except the Albatross were taken by me using a variety of Canon cameras. I'm not sure who the photographer was for the Albatross photo.

J.R.2009 07-27-2016 04:41 AM

Better late than never!! Great story and pics. I'll wake Bob see this this morn!:D
Maybe you two met over the years.
Thanks for the post.

J.R.2009 07-28-2016 01:06 PM

In post #108, about my first duty station at Wurtsmith AFB, I spotted a pic of a F-89 Scorpion. I had forgotten all about that aircraft and thought I dig up some info on it. You might be interested in what I found. At first glance I thought I was looking at a F-101 Voodoo.

http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/...throp-F89.html
http://www.militaryfactory.com/aircr...ircraft_id=362

When I saw it, it came back to me. I tried to find some pics of it firing salvos of those air to air rockets at aerial targets. Anyone got any?


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