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  #1  
Old 05-15-2016, 12:15 PM
sailor_jerry sailor_jerry is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 25
Default 1903a3 - National Ordnance

So I might have the opportunity to purchase a National Ordnance 1903a3. I've read several forums and post about the receivers being questionable at best. Assuming that the rest of the rifle is surplus, what would I expect to pay if I decide to jump on it? Also, is there any source of surplus receivers readily available or do I just need to keep my eye out online for a private seller?
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  #2  
Old 05-15-2016, 12:34 PM
Kansasbobcat Kansasbobcat is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Texas
Posts: 473
Default National Ord. A3

Brophy's M1903 book page 101. Brophy states that these are investment cast but that H.P. White Labs gave them "a clean bill of health" Original receivers can sometimes be salvaged from sporters but an expensive way to go. Probably better off looking for original rifle.
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  #3  
Old 05-15-2016, 12:46 PM
bruce bruce is offline
 
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Location: Georgia
Posts: 990
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Price? No more than a comparable drill rifle. The receiver is not worth serious effort. A drill rifle can be found and used w/ a surplus receiver. Better economy than using a receiver of no value. FWIW... owned two Nat. Ord. 03-A3 rifles. First had a worn barrel. Rebarreled... total cost of $41 (1982). Ended up with $141 in the rifle. Shot like a house a fire w/ the new barrel. Sold it for $250 a few years later. Second was exceptionally nice looking, virtually new in every respect. Very good shooting rifle w/ just about any decent load I tried. Let it go in a trade. Nowadays, would look for a good drill rifle and start from there. JMHO. Sincerely. bruce.
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Old 05-15-2016, 01:35 PM
ceresco ceresco is offline
 
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I buy them--generally at a hefty discount, strip off the parts which are usually excellent and transfer everything to a good salvaged drill receiver. Don't really know if the cast receivers are a problem, (I suspect not) but nothing beats a genuine A3 receiver, IMO. Good Shooting. ..
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  #5  
Old 05-16-2016, 10:12 AM
chuckindenver chuckindenver is offline
 
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not safe to fire with live ammo
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  #6  
Old 05-16-2016, 10:38 AM
Dollar Bill Dollar Bill is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Huntsville, Alabama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailor_jerry View Post
So I might have the opportunity to purchase a National Ordnance 1903a3. I've read several forums and post about the receivers being questionable at best. Assuming that the rest of the rifle is surplus, what would I expect to pay if I decide to jump on it? Also, is there any source of surplus receivers readily available or do I just need to keep my eye out online for a private seller?
The price of a Remington 1903A3 shooter minus the cost of a Remington receiver (about $200) and the cost for Chuck to swap the receiver out.

So about $450-$550.
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  #7  
Old 05-16-2016, 11:37 AM
S99VG S99VG is offline
 
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Location: Northern California
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If you go that route it seems to me that there should be a capable shop in your area that can do the barrel change and save you the cost of shipping. It's pretty fundamental work and should not be beyond the abilities of a good local gunsmith.
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  #8  
Old 05-16-2016, 08:53 PM
chuckindenver chuckindenver is offline
 
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heres some issues you may find..
some N/O rifles were so far out of spec, they had to cut the shoulder and breech of the barrel so that it would index and headspace..
if thats the case,. barrel is not usable for a standard A3 action..
gunsmiths arent like they used to be 30 years ago,, heck 15 years ago,
hand them a 1903 to rebarrel, and likely its the first one they have ever messed with..
but they sure can work on that AR15
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  #9  
Old 05-16-2016, 10:10 PM
shooter5x shooter5x is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 183
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∆ I agree with Chuck. I also like when these guys say they "build" AR's. It makes me chuckle when they build them just like tinker toys. Nothing against AR's, I just think of it more like assembling parts rather than actually "building" something. But hey, if it gets more people into shooting, then that's good I guess.
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  #10  
Old 05-16-2016, 10:14 PM
mwt mwt is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 56
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Did this a couple of years ago with a drill receiver and a NO in excellent condition for the rest of the USGI parts. I fortunately have an elderly gunsmith friend who let me use his tools and kept an eye on me so I didn't do something stupid. It was a great learning experience and the rifle shoots great. The only difficulty we experienced was removing the barrel from the NO receiver - that puppy was tight. After the barrel slipped in the bushings the third time I asked my friend if this was the hardest he had experienced to break loose. The old gentleman said -nope - but it is in the top five! Cost was about $475. Should have been $45 less but the seller of the NO failed to mention it was equipped with a black plastic hand guard even though he did mention it was unusually dark.


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