Go Back   CMP Forums > CMP Sales > CMP Bolt Action Rifles
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 02-14-2019, 07:34 AM
ceresco ceresco is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 7,442
Default

You can easily find period Reminton wood and stock metal for your rifle. The SC barrel and OSB rebuild stamp make it somewhat unique. I have a M1 with the same stamp. I would not put the CMP stock on that rifle. Genuine A3 stocks are redily available and the CMP stocks are nowhere near the quality of military wood. Nice rifle. Good Shooting. ... BTW--easy way to count barrel grooves is to drive a cast lead bullet into the muzzle a quarter inch and pull it out with pliers.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-14-2019, 09:12 AM
S99VG S99VG is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Northern California
Posts: 2,075
Default

Let’s talk about originality for a minute. To me, there are only two valid conditions that equate it. First, and inarguably, there is the factory original condition. That is the way it left the factory with the parts that were installed by factory workers. Those are truly rare to find. Second, there are arsenal rebuilds. That is the way it left a government arsenal with parts that were installed by an arsenal worker. Those are a little less rare to find but I fear are being destroyed on a daily basis. Historically both are correct and desirable and merit an asking price above the frey. And then there is everything else. No matter what anyone does to a rifle they cannot return it to either of those two honest conditions and no rebuild done outside government ownership of a piece should ever command as high of a price, though I am concerned over the number of copies floating around these days that may or will eventually get pawned off on some unsuspecting buyer as original. Finally I will add that there is nothing wrong with having a good Sporter as they represent a significant piece of history for these firearms. I fear that good Sporters are also getting destroyed on a daily basis. Everyone should have a good Sporter in their collection and maybe you should just be happy with what you have.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-14-2019, 07:18 PM
RC20 RC20 is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 583
Default

Quote:
I have never tried counting rifling grooves before. It was not easy. Very difficult to count and I’m not 100% sure of this, but it looks like 5 groove.
You just make a black mark or use the front sight and a toothpick and count groves. Its not as hard as it seems at first.
It has to be 2-4 or 6. Only 5s were Model of 1917 WWI.

My data on the OBS3 was a 3-43 Remington receiver with the SC date of 12-42.

OBS date was 22-2-45.

This is a rarity of a non OEM condition.

Its been through a field rebuild, but a WWII one at a base in Australia. This is the third one I know of all done in 1945. Odd date due to late in the War, it was like they were cranking them out for sending back to US (because that is where all 3 I know of are at!)

It has the provenance to prove it in the ID on the barrel as well as historic proof that this was done more than once (for OSB 3)

Where that puts it in collectibles I don't know. Mine was drilled and taped, this one is not. I do know there are collectors for those OBS worked on guns.

Last edited by RC20; 02-14-2019 at 08:12 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 02-15-2019, 12:03 AM
wingspar wingspar is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Oregon
Posts: 32
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ceresco View Post
BTW--easy way to count barrel grooves is to drive a cast lead bullet into the muzzle a quarter inch and pull it out with pliers.
That sounds like a good idea, but all I have around here in lead bullets are .357 Magnum and .45 Colt. I might ask my neighbor if he has any. He casts his own bullets.

I do have some .308 FMJ bullets. Would one of those work?
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 02-15-2019, 04:59 AM
ceresco ceresco is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 7,442
Default

Yes, but I wouldn't use a big hammer. Put some grease on it first. Good Shooting. .
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 02-15-2019, 01:57 PM
wingspar wingspar is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Oregon
Posts: 32
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ceresco View Post
Yes, but I wouldn't use a big hammer. Put some grease on it first. Good Shooting. .
Thanks. That worked. Itís 4 groove rifling.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 02-15-2019, 04:13 PM
Mike D Mike D is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 939
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wingspar View Post
Thanks. That worked. Itís 4 groove rifling.
That's very surprising, considering the 12-42 barrel date.

PLEASE, do not buy an after market stock! That rifle deserves on original. Rebuild stamped, or not. Not a scant or C-stock, but a straight one. That is my opinion.

Mike
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 02-15-2019, 05:40 PM
Calfed Calfed is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: California
Posts: 1,476
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wingspar View Post
I have never tried counting rifling grooves before. It was not easy. Very difficult to count and Iím not 100% sure of this, but it looks like 5 groove.

One easy way of counting the grooves is to take a picture of the bore.


Here is a pic of the bore of a sported SC 03A3 that I picked up a little while ago...


Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 02-15-2019, 06:59 PM
RC20 RC20 is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 583
Default

Quote:
That's very surprising, considering the 12-42 barrel date.

PLEASE, do not buy an after market stock! That rifle deserves on original. Rebuild stamped, or not. Not a scant or C-stock, but a straight one. That is my opinion.
Actually not surprising, more 4s than 6s, though more 6s than people thought. I think JB has it up around 20k?

Agreed on the stock. Any stock that is WWII would work fine. Value is really the unique receiver/barrel and where it was put together. You can sell it without a stock to people who collect these at no loss of value (don't sell it of course), they would get it in a correct stock.

I would give my left toe to be back in Brisbane in 1945 to see what was going on. I don't say bad ugly or anything, just enterprising maybe and cool piece of history.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 02-16-2019, 08:35 AM
navyrifleman navyrifleman is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 230
Default

I recently purchased an original straight grip 03A3 stock in decent (good) condition from SARCO for about $75. It had some number markings stamped on it and some character dings. It was of about 1943 vintage. They have some better condition original stocks of the same type for about $125.

You would have to buy a handguard and all the stock hardware as well (Upper and lower bands, swivels, bayonet lug, etc.) which they also have for sale.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:54 PM.