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  #11  
Old 08-12-2019, 11:44 PM
M1 sniper M1 sniper is offline
 
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I think mine made it to France! Well maybe during ww2 anyway lol.
Mine was built in 1934.
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  #12  
Old 08-13-2019, 07:21 AM
navyrifleman navyrifleman is offline
 
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The vast majority of American troops had returned from Europe to the US by fall of 1919, only a year after the Armistice.

My grandfather was in the last US Army Medical unit to return from Europe, and I have their mustering out photo taken in New Jersey in August 1919. He had served with the American 1st Army and then was transferred in November 1918 (with most of the 1st Army) to the Army of Occupation, or what became the US 3rd Army. Even today the patch of the 3rd Army is a white "A" inside a red "O" on a blue field. The A and O stand for "Army of Occupation".

There certainly were US Army units remaining in Europe for some years afterward, including Archangel, Russia.

Regarding the rifles used by the US Army in WW I, there is a book titled "Making the Kaiser Dance" which was written in the 1970's and it included many interviews with WW I veterans then still living. In it one old soldier talks about two different rifles which he refers to as "Springfields" and "Remingtons", meaning the 1903 and the 1917 models.

Last edited by navyrifleman; 08-13-2019 at 07:27 AM.
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  #13  
Old 08-13-2019, 11:10 AM
SpearheadOrd SpearheadOrd is offline
 
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A little additional history. The US troops supporting operations in Northern Russia (AEF North Russia) had Mosin Nagants, many of them were National Guardsmen from Michigan.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americ...,_North_Russia.

The AEF Siberia were Regular Army troops and supposedly had US weapons.

The Post WWI US army of Occupation was headquartered in Koblenz, GE as mentioned above probably all had M1903's .

Last edited by SpearheadOrd; 08-13-2019 at 01:56 PM.
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  #14  
Old 08-13-2019, 02:41 PM
navyrifleman navyrifleman is offline
 
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The Archangel based Michigan troops had the Polar Bear as their unit emblem and it was painted on their Helmets.

They were stationed in Russia to keep Allied supplies which were stockpiled at Archangel from falling into Red Army hands. As such, they had plenty of Remington made Mosin Nagants and ammunition for them available.

Remington-made Mosin Nagants were actually designated as supplemental US weapons during WW I after Russia defaulted on the contract for them, and the US government bought them from Remington. Many were used in the US for training purposes.

A bit more history; a number of US soldiers were killed, wounded, and captured by the Russian Red Army in several clashes, and a number of American civilians in Russia were also arrested and held as prisoners. In the early 1920's when a major famine hit Russia, the US was asked to provide food and supplies. President Harding said that he would consider it AFTER the Russians released all Americans being held prisoner. Surprisingly and in response, the Russians released several hundred Americans. Unfortunately no American servicemen were among them, but it was learned from returned Americans that some soldiers had been held for a long time after capture.

Last edited by navyrifleman; 08-13-2019 at 02:44 PM.
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  #15  
Old 08-13-2019, 03:28 PM
Jpm Jpm is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cplnorton View Post
For instance they didn't send Winchester M1917's to France. That was at least the policy even as late as summer 1918.
That's pretty interesting. Any idea the reason behind that?? Seems odd they would single out a particular brand like that.
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  #16  
Old 08-13-2019, 04:07 PM
RHScott RHScott is offline
 
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They were not fully interchangeable with the other two makers. Logistics.
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  #17  
Old 08-13-2019, 07:41 PM
cplnorton cplnorton is online now
 
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I haven't read all the docs yet. It will take me some time but as RHScott said it looks like the early ones wouldn't interchange parts with the others.

Also all WRA's were going to the MArines. The Marines were adopting the M1917 for the war and were going to replace all their M1903's with WRA M1917's.

WRA wasn't happy about this either...

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  #18  
Old 08-13-2019, 08:54 PM
Kaliman Kaliman is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by navyrifleman View Post
The Archangel based Michigan troops had the Polar Bear as their unit emblem and it was painted on their Helmets.

They were stationed in Russia to keep Allied supplies which were stockpiled at Archangel from falling into Red Army hands. As such, they had plenty of Remington made Mosin Nagants and ammunition for them available.

Remington-made Mosin Nagants were actually designated as supplemental US weapons during WW I after Russia defaulted on the contract for them, and the US government bought them from Remington. Many were used in the US for training purposes.

A bit more history; a number of US soldiers were killed, wounded, and captured by the Russian Red Army in several clashes, and a number of American civilians in Russia were also arrested and held as prisoners. In the early 1920's when a major famine hit Russia, the US was asked to provide food and supplies. President Harding said that he would consider it AFTER the Russians released all Americans being held prisoner. Surprisingly and in response, the Russians released several hundred Americans. Unfortunately no American servicemen were among them, but it was learned from returned Americans that some soldiers had been held for a long time after capture.
Many European nations can attest their captured sons were never returned by the Russians. War is terrible as is but it seems quite inhumane and terrible to hold people after the war is over. Sometimes for the rest of their lives.
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  #19  
Old 08-13-2019, 08:56 PM
Jpm Jpm is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RHScott View Post
They were not fully interchangeable with the other two makers. Logistics.
That makes sense, first I've heard of that issue too. Thanks!

That's a pretty curt letter from Winchester, I'd say they were quite displeased!
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  #20  
Old 08-13-2019, 08:56 PM
Rick the Librarian Rick the Librarian is online now
 
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[QUOTE=navyrifleman;1859222]The Archangel based Michigan troops had the Polar Bear as their unit emblem and it was painted on their Helmets.

You might be confusing the Michigan unit (339th Infantry) with the 31st Infantry, that saw service in Siberia. They carry a polar bear insignia on their regimental crest.
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