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Old 02-22-2013, 09:33 AM
Silver Shamrock Silver Shamrock is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 332
Default T31: John Garand's bullpup

Here's a easy, short read about Garand's last design for Springfield Armory on Forgotten Weapons blog site. And there are few links to the T25 too. Enjoy
http://www.forgottenweapons.com/t31-...rands-bullpup/
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Old 02-22-2013, 11:21 AM
togor togor is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Wisconsin
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Fascinating read, thanks for posting.

I've heard it said that Garand was a genius. And maybe so; certainly the M1 rifle had a terrific run, and arguably was the first and only time that the US infantryman had a rifle clearly superior to what his contemporaries were fielding at the time. But it seemed to me that on the road to the M1 that we came to know and love, there were a fair number of lesser ideas from the fertile mind of Mr. Garand that had to be weeded out. Primer blowback and later the gas trap system, being two examples. Was it as some claim, that Ordnance refused to let an infantry rifle have a gas port in the barrel, for fear of a loss of accuracy? And that it was only under dire circumstances that they relented? I have heard this story, and I don't know if it is true or not.

But in my view, the uncontested #1 genius of US firearms design is, and will remain, John Moses Browning. I still hunt with my father's old Auto-5, a 1950's Belgian model. A remarkable design for 1900. I've heard that Browning design a couple of other weapons as well, some of which were used by the army.
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Old 02-22-2013, 12:15 PM
Harry O Harry O is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
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togor: From my reading about Mr. Garand and his rifle, both the primer setback actuation and the gas-trap ideas were Government requirements at the time which he had to incorporate into the design. When they did not work, he was allowed to come up with other solutions.
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Old 02-22-2013, 12:17 PM
Silver Shamrock Silver Shamrock is offline
 
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I agree that JMB is #1 as far as US small arms design. What I'm learning through reading histories of arms development post-WW1 (Garand vs Pedersen vs Johnson designs) and post WW2 (M1 variations to the M14 to the M16 and beyond) is that bureaucracy and "fighting the last war" have impeded (and probably always will) the end results. As it stands today the American GI has been enjoyed some wonderful tools to do his job. If you want to read more on the subject pick up a copy of Hatchers' "Book of the Garand" and Ezell's "The Great Rifle Controversy". Reading both will give you a good look at the M1 delevopment up to and including the M16A2. Ezell's book is hard to come by - pricey when you can find one but worth having a copy. I have one now in my library.
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