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  #11  
Old 07-13-2014, 04:36 PM
tailslide tailslide is offline
 
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Youngblood, how about a picture? At least an after, since it doesn't sound like you took a before.
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  #12  
Old 07-13-2014, 05:42 PM
The Original Youngblood The Original Youngblood is offline
 
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I'll make a note ... next time I am doing any firearms or component pics, I will pull out that specific M1 that I mentioned and add it to the list ... probably going to need a sunny day to do it justice.

At some point in its life I think that the stock may have been boned.
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  #13  
Old 07-14-2014, 12:32 PM
Amish Bob Amish Bob is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Original Youngblood View Post
I'll make a note ... next time I am doing any firearms or component pics, I will pull out that specific M1 that I mentioned and add it to the list ... probably going to need a sunny day to do it justice.

At some point in its life I think that the stock may have been boned.
OK, I'll bite....................explain "boned"

AB
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  #14  
Old 07-14-2014, 07:59 PM
The Original Youngblood The Original Youngblood is offline
 
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To bone a stock you rub it with something hard & smooth in order to smooth the wood by compressing the surface wood fibers.

I have read more than one account of fellows who returned from the Mess with a chicken bone that they saved to use in boning their rifle stock.

It doesn't have to be a bone ... a spoon, a tusk or even your fingernails can be used.
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  #15  
Old 08-08-2014, 04:10 PM
Aladinbama Aladinbama is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Original Youngblood View Post
To bone a stock you rub it with something hard & smooth in order to smooth the wood by compressing the surface wood fibers.
I have read more than one account of fellows who returned from the Mess with a chicken bone that they saved to use in boning their rifle stock.
I hear that coke and beer bottles were commonly used since they were handy. Sometimes it may have been just a piece of glass. I've seen stocks boned so well they would make a polyurethane finish jealous of its shine!
A guy from NC sent me a stock to (ruin) refinish with instructions on what he wanted it to look like. It was a parade quality beautiful birch stock that just glistened. I did it, but it was the last time I refinished a stock for anybody.
Generally, a good oil scrub, as mentioned, is all that is necessary
FWIW, boning is sometimes referred to as combing a stock. I just thought I would add that.
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  #16  
Old 10-23-2014, 07:41 AM
for10berry for10berry is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Knoxville,tn
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i know what you mean i just got an 6 digit sa and i loved the dark just back from the war look.then i cleaned it real good and im sick ,the stock dosent match the handgaurds so now i will have to scrub them to get them to match and apply blo and hope for the best.lesson learned,wipe it down and leave it alone!
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  #17  
Old 03-19-2015, 08:33 AM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is online now
 
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You should be able to find MEK at an auto body shop, if not they can order it. A 1-quart can should be around $10; enough to last,.......forever!
Keep in mind a few things:
1. It will evaporate very quickly, so keep the lid tight; I pour a bit in a metal container (like an ashtray) for use. The fumes are far from healthy, so use it outdoors or in a well ventilated area.
2. MEK, in addition to being used as a commercial paint thinner, is used to weld many types of plastic (such as plexiglass, and it is the main component in plastic model glue), so if you are a model builder, keep some for that use. However, this also means it will melt plastic! So, do not pour it into a plastic container, styrofoam cup, etc! If the gun you are working on has plastic, test first, or just remove the plastic. It is fine on most wood, but I suggest testing on a hidden spot, like under the buttplate or barrel channel to see how it works on the stock, it may be too aggressive for your needs.
3. Being a solvent, and not water based, it cleans without raisin the wood grain, so sanding or steel wool/scotchbrite may not bee needed later.

I find MEK to be a good tool for other uses in firearms cleaning, I use it to clean years of dried oil and crud (aka "Patina"!) off metal, so it may not be what you want for SOME applications. Drop a sling swivel that has yellowed from oil and years of use into some MEK, let it sit for a few minutes, then gently scrub it clean with scotchbrite, it will look brand new. It removes all oil, so make sure to re-oil all metal (parkerized, blued, bare, whatever, (because everything has been removed down to the metal/blue/parkerizing); they all need oil!)

OYB makes a good point, his approach is very minimalistic, so I would always suggest trying less aggressive cleaning methods first. Oil Scrubs work great (and they do remove, not embed, but not 100% any more than any other "scrub). So, another way of stating OYB's approach is 1st do a good cleaning, then maybe an oil scrub; this may result in the great looking stock you seek. If not, you can can continue with the more aggressive methods, but oftentimes there is just no need.
Lapriester's mention of the dishwasher is not as crazy as it sounds. I am 99% sure the person that first suggested it was somewhat ridiculed, but if curious spend a few minutes on some of the milsurp forums, it remains a popular solution. It does as he says, removes just about all grease, cosmo, crud, whatever, and raises most dents. Is if "the best", of course not, and such a method does not exist, but is is great for some stocks. It probably will raise cartouches, so that is far from "best" for some uses, but for a beater stock, that you want to make look better than new, it has many benefits.
But if you are more of a collector than a shooter, a dishwasher is not in your future!
JH
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  #18  
Old 03-19-2015, 05:06 PM
HC-7 HC-7 is online now
 
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MEK was removed from the Army Aviation program during the late 90's...I would suggest using acetone or denatured alcohol....They are just a little bit healthier than MEK....regards....alex
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  #19  
Old 03-28-2015, 08:50 PM
sadtcong sadtcong is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 54
Smile Cleaning on M-1 stocks

Let me first introduce my self my email name is sadtcong , in reference to cleaning M-1 stocks i have been using TSP and hot water,also gojo. It seem to be doing a fair to good job. Let dry and reapply BLO (BOILED LINSEEDOIL) the stocks have been coming fairly decent i am trying to keep the military look. I am open to other suggestions . If i do not learn something new every day i figure i am 6ft below the ground. Open to comments NEWBY
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  #20  
Old 03-29-2015, 05:56 AM
The Original Youngblood The Original Youngblood is offline
 
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Actually, sadtcong, the thread is about not automatically doing what you just described, but, instead, carefully checking for a beautiful finish hidden under the grime first before removing it all and starting over.

... but, thanks for sharing your stripping-it-down method.

I have a lot of respect for the "cleaning power" of TSP. Prior to repainting the ceiling of my (BIG) front porch, I used a TSP solution along with a clean push broom to clean the surfaces.

After working at this for awhile, I realized that the TSP was dissolving the green enamel on the metal push broom handle ...
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