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  #21  
Old 03-31-2015, 02:23 PM
primus7 primus7 is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
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TOYB, just an update on the progress I've made with my stock. I gave it a good once over with particular attention on the interior surfaces and it has made quite difference. The interior was heavily coated with thick black grime. So heavy in fact that at first I thought it could be flat black paint. The going over with the solution, I used BLO/water 50/50 with a drop of Dawn for an emulsifier, made a shocking difference. The wood came through so nicely that using a clean steel wool pad went over the exterior with less dramatic results, happily, but the grain is coming alive. This is absolutely what I wanted for this stock. Thanks for the tips and rundown of NOT refinishing. Thumbs up for the technique brother.
As an aside, close examination of the stock has revealed 3 "T" stampings on the right side of the butt, about 5/8ths of an inch from the edge of the butt plate. The "T"s are not in a straight line perhaps indicating that they were applied independent of each other, ie one at a time. There is also what appears to be an "18" or "1o" just to the rear of the barrel band indent. Any thoughts on what these markings could be? As always, any help is appreciated. Thanks gang.
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  #22  
Old 09-05-2015, 11:34 AM
lemaymiami lemaymiami is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
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Hi, newby here (but not new to a bit of woodwork/refinishing) so I have a few questions for OYB (or anyone else willing to explain a few things)... I assume BLO is boiled linseed oil as it comes from the store (is there a preferred brand or any brands to avoid?) but would like to know what you're using for cut/BLO... are we talking water or some kind of solvent? I also read about "Tom's 1/3" and would like to know what that is... Lastly you mentioned oil free (or degreased) steel wool -please explain. I'm familiar with 0000 steel wool with Kroil for rust removal on blued surfaces (and it works very well) but I haven't heard of oil free wool....

Since I'm also a rodbuilder, (retired cop - been a fishing guide now for almost 20 years down here in paradise) I frequently clean various polyurethaned or epoxy coated surfaces while doing repairs. I've learned to use a progression of solvents for cleaning -starting with alcohol (least aggressive), then mineral spirits, then lacquer thinner (good for some surfaces but dangerous around some paints...), finally acetone (killer stuff- but will remove most finishes so I only use it around fiberglass or metal surfaces).

Greatly appreciate this site (not a CMP buyer yet -but want a carbine if funds will ever allow...) and the knowledge here. I know a bunch about rodbuilding and boat rigging but I'm a beginner about restoring old stocks --will enjoy learning.
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  #23  
Old 09-05-2015, 02:03 PM
The Original Youngblood The Original Youngblood is offline
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Virginia, on the west side of my ancestral farm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lemaymiami View Post
Hi, newby here (but not new to a bit of woodwork/refinishing) so I have a few questions for OYB (or anyone else willing to explain a few things)... I assume BLO is boiled linseed oil as it comes from the store (is there a preferred brand or any brands to avoid?) but would like to know what you're using for cut/BLO... are we talking water or some kind of solvent? I also read about "Tom's 1/3" and would like to know what that is... Lastly you mentioned oil free (or degreased) steel wool -please explain. I'm familiar with 0000 steel wool with Kroil for rust removal on blued surfaces (and it works very well) but I haven't heard of oil free wool....
I use BLO from the store (my 16oz can of Sunnyside-brand is still ~25% full). I use low-odor Mineral Spirits to dilute it (as well as my Tung Oil) but some use Turpentine. I have never read of any brands of BLO that should be avoided.

I won't allow Tom's 1/3 or its like near any of my stocks, but others seem to love the stuff. I'm sure that someone will step in and tell you about it.

I de-oil steelwool in by washing it in Mineral Spirits, letting it dry and then bagging it tightly (with an enclosed desiccant) for later use.

HTH!
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  #24  
Old 09-06-2015, 07:17 AM
lemaymiami lemaymiami is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
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Thanks for the quick response - as usual the real learning will only come when it's hands on....
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  #25  
Old 12-03-2015, 11:42 AM
ACampComLegacy ACampComLegacy is offline
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Snow Hill NC
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I think there's one thing to keep in mind here; Linseed Oil polymerizes - that is, it turns into a SOLID. Once cured, it takes a STRONG alkaline chemical to solve it. Either that, or physical 'abrasion', to cut into it.

Most household cleaners don't have a high enough pH to touch the cured Linseed Oil - the plasticized surface. I think Simple Green is in that category...

I think any mildly basic (pH-wise) household cleaner would solve grime on the surface, and then wash off.

Second coats of oil won't cure, unless they're wiped SO very thin. Too much will result in a sticky, gummy product.
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  #26  
Old 12-04-2015, 12:01 AM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
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Linseed and Tung oil are used on stocks because of they polymerize. However, tey do not become a "polymer" like most define it.
For 20 years I have used BLO and PTO, and common household cleaners will take them down to the wood with ease. In fact, I generally dilute the cleaners (Purple Power, Citrus Spray or Simple Green) with water, or simply buy the fales at Dollar Tree (already diluted for me!). I spray until dripping, let it sit for 30 min or so, then scrub lightly (steel wool, scotchbrite(again, dollar tree)). n Maybe 2-3 sessions are needed, but there is simply no need to go any faster.
Of course, THIS thread is about OYB's less intrusive method of stock rejuvenation.
or a review of a more aggressive method, look here:
http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=158125

That thread is not a "better" way, just different. To me, each stock seems to prefer a specific technique (and the overall collecting/restoring/preserving philosophy is key).
I recently acquired 2 Mossbergs (a 42Mb and 44USd both form the 40s) and used OYB's tutorial to attack the stocks. I'll try to post the pics on the link abve in a few days, but the results were as seen in THIS thread. Better method than that in my link above, up to you. It worked perfect from me, and will remain in my arsenal of techniques for future stocks.
By the way, I was happy to use OYB's steps knowing full well that if I didn't care for the results, my standard diluted dollar store water based spray, scotchbrite and an hour of work would allow me to tray a different method.
I have some M14 stocks I use for tests, they have multiple spots of different finishes, stains and waxes, and have been finished, taken down to the wood, and redone multiple times. They have never seen sandpaper or chemical stripper.
JH
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  #27  
Old 02-20-2016, 07:13 PM
ozarkmac ozarkmac is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Missouri Ozarks
Posts: 369
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Original Youngblood View Post
Replying to a couple of refinishing threads here recently reminded me of something to which I tumbled years ago while dealing with some old, nasty-looking USGI stocks that came on a few of my early Greek Rackers.

I remember that one of the stocks was particularly ugly ... almost black, filthy, greasy ... but not abused-looking. My first thought was to strip it and redo it with BLO & Tung Oil ... but I hesitated.

I decided to first clean it and then treat it to what I think of as a Cleaning App of BLO (thoroughly scrub the stock with a ½biscuit of de-oiled 0000 steel wool dipped in cut BLO).

So I wiped it down a couple of times with a degreasing spray (I use orange-smelling stuff in a spray bottle from the grocery store).

The I scrubbed all surfaces vigorously with the BLO-dipped steelwool, turning and redipping the pad periodically. I let the resulting YUCK sit, untouched, on the stock for ~20 minutes before wiping it off with papertowels. I then lightly buffed the stock and put it in front of a fan in a low-RH area.

Next morning, I rebuffed and discovered (actually something that I suspected the night before) that I had saved a beoooootiful oil finish that had been lurking just under the crap. To this day, I think that that rifle sports what I think is the best look & feel of any stock of its type in my collection (read: accumulation) ... silky-smooth and a deep, dark reddish brown/black.

So the moral of the story is ... before stripping that ugly duckling, first see if there is a swan underneath. If there is no swan, then go ahead and strip away ... BUT, once stripped, any original hidden beauty is gone forever.

I have since saved & refreshed (rather than refinished) quite a few different oil-finished milsurp stocks in this way.

Just thought that I would take a moment to share the approach with those who may benefit from it.
Been reading a bunch of information on cleaning stocks and this one, as well as another one I watched on Youtube, make the most sense. Start with the least invasive products and advance as needed. The Youtube I watched was a gent that had cleaned dozens the same way. His process was just as simple as The Orig YB. A 50/50 mix of plain old Turpentine and Boiled Linseed Oil. He used a 0000 piece of steel wool and lightly rubbed it several time as needed until all the grime was removed and in most cases, as The Orig YB stated, there was a beautiful or at least "acceptable" finish under it all. For me, the last thing I want to do is do a full refinish job.
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  #28  
Old 02-21-2016, 08:26 AM
Orlando Orlando is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ACampComLegacy View Post
I think there's one thing to keep in mind here; Linseed Oil polymerizes - that is, it turns into a SOLID. Once cured, it takes a STRONG alkaline chemical to solve it. Either that, or physical 'abrasion', to cut into it.

Most household cleaners don't have a high enough pH to touch the cured Linseed Oil - the plasticized surface. I think Simple Green is in that category...

I think any mildly basic (pH-wise) household cleaner would solve grime on the surface, and then wash off.

Second coats of oil won't cure, unless they're wiped SO very thin. Too much will result in a sticky, gummy product.
Purple Power easily strips it off
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  #29  
Old 02-23-2016, 09:30 PM
LTCGOU LTCGOU is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Ohio
Posts: 50
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Any suggestions on how to break down areas which appear to be shellac in appearance? I have a couple stocks that I cleaned up with Mineral Spirits but It wouldn't touch a few spots. I don't want to strip it down to the bare wood but back to the original finish with out all the grime. Thanks..
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  #30  
Old 02-24-2016, 05:41 AM
Orlando Orlando is offline
 
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Location: Ohio
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If the shiney areas are old BLO Purple Power will remove it. If its shellac, etc you will need a chemical paint stripper
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