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  #11  
Old 04-24-2018, 07:49 AM
Parkr1942 Parkr1942 is offline
 
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I have fired hundreds of 1938 Turkish 8 mm and found it was very accurate and had zero problems.
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  #12  
Old 04-24-2018, 09:19 AM
A Seabee A Seabee is offline
 
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There's a guy on Youtube that metal detects for WWII artifacts in Europe, somewhere. He found a German large caliber machine gun round underwater, in a creek. dried it off, pulled the projectile, and lit the powder. it went up in a bright yellow whoosh!
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  #13  
Old 04-24-2018, 09:35 AM
old ironside old ironside is offline
 
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A farmer found the remains of a civil war musket in his field and decided to heat it and turn it into something useful. It was rusted and just a round pole to him. That poor farmer died upon heating the barrel and setting off the unfired powder and ball inside while standing in front of it.
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  #14  
Old 04-24-2018, 07:56 PM
jmm jmm is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by captaincalc View Post
On the other hand, I have some 1943 M2 that's gone crappy. Primers, I'd suspect?
Probably the powder deteriorating.
It breaks down and generates acid from the nitrogen compounds created. That's why the cases corrode from the inside.
As I recall, corrosive primers were used but some countries into the 1980's because they lasted better in their tests than non-corrosive primers.
I also seem to recall that single-based powders last better than double-based powders in long-term tests.
I wish I could remember my source for that info.
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  #15  
Old 04-24-2018, 09:37 PM
Kansasbobcat Kansasbobcat is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Texas
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Default old ammo

I have shot a lot of WW2 ammo, most of it US with no problems except a few split necks. The worst I have shot was WW2 British .303. Lots of hang fires...if you think you do not flinch try shooting ammo that takes a few seconds to go off.
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  #16  
Old 04-25-2018, 06:15 AM
john17427 john17427 is offline
 
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Location: Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmm View Post
The military expects properly stored ammo to work after 100 years.
I'm not about to let anyone point a gun at me loaded with WWI ammo, that's for sure.
This has always been my feeling on ammo age. I figure if itís over 100 years old, itís time to shoot it or put it in a museum.
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  #17  
Old 04-25-2018, 08:04 AM
moose moose is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kansasbobcat View Post
I have shot a lot of WW2 ammo, most of it US with no problems except a few split necks. The worst I have shot was WW2 British .303. Lots of hang fires...if you think you do not flinch try shooting ammo that takes a few seconds to go off.
British 303 (and a lot of other 303) does NOT have the shelf life of ammo loaded with normal powder. Why? Because they loaded it with Cordite.



Cordite as it gets older does some funny stuff which causes the hang fires.
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  #18  
Old 04-25-2018, 01:17 PM
Brownac1983 Brownac1983 is offline
 
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http://www.foxnews.com/story/2008/05...all-blast.html
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  #19  
Old 04-25-2018, 06:40 PM
old sagarand old sagarand is offline
 
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Since no one as said it....
Ammo expires when you shoot it

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmm View Post
Probably the powder deteriorating.
It breaks down and generates acid from the nitrogen compounds created. That's why the cases corrode from the inside.
As I recall, corrosive primers were used but some countries into the 1980's because they lasted better in their tests than non-corrosive primers.
I also seem to recall that single-based powders last better than double-based powders in long-term tests.
I wish I could remember my source for that info.
There is a sticky in the reloading forum with some info on detreating powder.
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  #20  
Old 04-25-2018, 07:44 PM
Ammolab Ammolab is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moose View Post
British 303 (and a lot of other 303) does NOT have the shelf life of ammo loaded with normal powder. Why? Because they loaded it with Cordite.



Cordite as it gets older does some funny stuff which causes the hang fires.
Cordite made after WW1 is very stable and this stability is why the UK stayed with Cordite until the 1950s - 1960s. The hangfires in old UK and Pakistani .303 are primer issues.
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