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  #21  
Old 04-14-2019, 12:44 PM
JCinPA JCinPA is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 41
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That would be nice, I know how to use them I'd just rather not buy a set if I can avoid it. I am in PA. Thanks for the tip on the Inland bolts.
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  #22  
Old 04-14-2019, 02:54 PM
GotSnlB28 GotSnlB28 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: WI
Posts: 1,125
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I like to consider myself a temporary caretaker of history. Over time lots of stuff happens, just like your rifle stuffed up in a ceiling. I would never consider keeping rifle parts separate of the rifle when in storage, because, stuff happens over time and gets forgotten or not realized by the next guy. I guess that's what makes the originals even more rare going forward.
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  #23  
Old 04-14-2019, 03:55 PM
6 Ring 6 Ring is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: South of Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 2,941
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Most of the time, a different bolt headspaces just fine. And there is nothing saying, the bolt in it is OK, other than it shoots. I always ask, "What is your twelve year old daughter's eyes worth?
You can take the risk, because you know better. How about others who might shoot it?
PM sent.
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  #24  
Old 04-14-2019, 04:51 PM
JCinPA JCinPA is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 41
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Thanks for the PM, 6 Ring.

Well, I ordered an Inland bolt, and a forum member is loaning me some gauges so I can do this right. What a great forum. I haven't been around in about 10 years once I got settled down with my Garand.

I'm going to carefully, very carefully, label a small box and keep the original bolt, recoil spring, hammer spring, and the sling components in the sealed box in the garage safe, with a little dessicant, and I'll use the new bolt, and replace the springs with new ones. I will also try to get a photo of the now deceased original owner in uniform and some details from his widow and keep them with the parts.

Like I said, it will be very rarely shot and end up in my son's possession, but I want all the original equipment because it is a collectible. I appreciate all the comments and advice. I'm going to peruse this subforum to glean more information from it. You are a very knowledgeable group, which I already knew from my Garand experience.

Thanks, all!

-John
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  #25  
Old 04-14-2019, 06:24 PM
Durango56 Durango56 is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Ohio
Posts: 193
Default Inland

Not trying to help you spend more money but that is a fairly pricey stock. If you plan on shooting it a lot I would get a replacement stock as I've seen the wood split or chunk off at the recoil plate.
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  #26  
Old 04-14-2019, 07:38 PM
JCinPA JCinPA is offline
 
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Posts: 41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Durango56
Not trying to help you spend more money but that is a fairly pricey stock. If you plan on shooting it a lot I would get a replacement stock as I've seen the wood split or chunk off at the recoil plate.
I'm not going to shoot it a lot--I plan to shoot it very, very little, now that I know what I have. What with working out of town (both my son and I) and the number of guns we have, it will likely get shot only every several years. It will actually be (for the most part) a safe queen simply because we don't have a lot of shooting time and we have a lot of guns.

I will baby this I promise. I recognized right away the need to protect the sling and oiler. I appreciate the suggestion to store the original bolt, to, but I'm not going any further. We will baby this gun to the max, use a hard case for transport, use pads on the bench, probably only my son and I will shoot it, but it will get shot. I suspect that to some collectors here that really sounds blasphemous, and maybe makes your hair stand straight out, but it's just how we roll. It will be OK, I promise!

It shows very little barrel wear, and you can tell from that bullet in the muzzle photo (below) that it hasn't been shot a lot during WWII, as well, and was well-maintained. It is a robust, little-fired, military arm that has been safely stored for decades with no use. It did not all of a sudden age into some delicate wallflower that is likely to shoot itself to bits first trip out to the range. Really, I inspected it very closely before shooting it this past weekend, and it is in remarkably excellent shape. I have Go/No Go gauges on the way, and will use them.

I get that it's history. I get that I got very lucky stumbling into (probably) an as out-the-factory door specimen as they come without really looking for one. I get that some of these are fairly shot up and probably would not be robust enough to shoot much. But it is in terrific shape and I'm not the least bit worried that a little light shooting every few years is going to hurt this gun at all--or it's collector value. But in an effort to forestall an endless string of, "My God, man, how can you shoot that!" posts, I'm posting this. If I replacing everything on it, I may as well not shoot it then and get another gun! This is safe to shoot. I promise my son and I will baby it. We will preserve all original parts very carefully so this piece of history remains with us intact for a long, long time.

But. It. Will. Be. Shot.

Very seldom, only by my son and I, and with the utmost care taken to get it back in the safe in good condition. But it will be shot. I am not persuadable otherwise. So get used to it.

Again, thank you all for the excellent suggestions. But if this sits in the safe all the time and sees maybe 200 rounds in the next 10 years, it's just not going to affect it at all.

-John


Last edited by JCinPA; 04-14-2019 at 07:39 PM. Reason: correction
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  #27  
Old 04-14-2019, 08:20 PM
Durango56 Durango56 is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Ohio
Posts: 193
Default To shoot or not to shoot

Wasn't trying to upset you. It's a forum, was just a suggestion for a worse case scenario. Looks like a nice rifle have fun with it.
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  #28  
Old 04-14-2019, 08:51 PM
m1a1fan m1a1fan is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 646
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The following is just my opinion, but it needs to be said as I think others have hinted at it. The OP doesn't need parts for it. If the OP is going to go down the parts rabbit hole, why not just replace all of them? Doing so would be more expensive, take time and this type of carbine already exists. It's called mixmaster and acquiring one would be a compliment to the one in original condition. Mixmasters can be found pretty easily. Just saw two sell relatively close to me for $750 each out the door and they were above average. Not original, but solid, honest and ready to shoot. There is nothing like the fun a father and son can have shooting a mixmaster carbine and talking about the preserved and documented ones in their collection. What good is a passed down legacy if it is broken?

Some say carbines are meant to be shot (mixmasters), others preserved (original carbines). Preservation is more than just keeping oil and RLO on it. Documenting, researching, caretaking. I, and I'm sure others know a few people who shot their original carbines and they broke despite the hints and warnings. Not one were happy about it and I don't hear from them much anymore. After many tries, the best I could do was finally convince a friend to change his exquisitely carved stock for a birch M2 birch stock I gave him just so he woudn't ruin it. For him and his son.

A very knowledgable collector once pointed me to an auction carbine. I asked why he had contacted me he said, "In the short time I've known you, I can tell you are a collector, will preserve and hopefully research it. It deserves to be in a collector's hands." Those words have always stuck with me. Preserve, research, deserve and collector. I still have it and other than some gathered dust, it is how I found it.

Obviously, it is yours to do with as you please and no disrespect intended. After all, it's only original once.
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  #29  
Old 04-14-2019, 10:11 PM
JCinPA JCinPA is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Durango56 View Post
Wasn't trying to upset you. It's a forum, was just a suggestion for a worse case scenario. Looks like a nice rifle have fun with it.
Hahahaha! No, I'm NOT upset, Durango! I'm more worried I'm upsetting you collectors, I don't want to seem like I'm disrespecting you or not understanding the weapon I lucked into. I want you to understand how I think. I'm not upset at all, but frankly, I'm worried about sounding cavalier about what a great rifle I lucked into by shooting it and offending you fine people.

You guys have all sorts of amazingly wonderful historical rifles that maybe can't be shot much without degrading them. I understand that. This is not that rifle. It's practically in new condition, IMO. And therefore putting a few hundred rounds through it won't hurt it. Some very fragile historical specimens should not be shot.

I don't want to offend you guys, it's not the other way around. I like getting another bolt, and keeping this mostly in the safe. The only shooters will be me and my son. It won't be often. I'll hard-case transport it, lay it on pads on the bench, got another bolt and removed the sling/oiler because I recognized they should be preserved.

I'm not offended at all, and appreciate the suggestions, especially about preserving the original bolt. I just don't want to offend you collectors. But with a rifle like this, in as good condition as it is, AND after ordering another bolt (good idea), I'm not going to worry about putting a couple hundred rounds down the bore with my son over the next ten years. I am both respecting it's historical value and preserving it, and at the same time, not going nuts about never shooting it. It can take a little shooting. I'd be irresponsible to make it a range plinker.

I'm good. I hope you guys are, too. I'm respecting the rifle, going to treat it very carefully, but it is not some delicate wallflower that can never be fired. As M1Afan said, "it's only original once". True. The apparently few rounds fired through it have left it a very robust, nice specimen, and after saving original parts, shooting a few hundred rounds through it over a decade is not going to affect its value one iota.

I'm not offended, nobody got me upset, I just hope I didn't upset any of you collectors, and I want you to know I'm serious about preserving it for posterity. Evidence is my spending money to get a replacement bolt for the light shooting we will do with it. It will be mostly a safe queen. I'm happy not treating it like a plinker and doing some responsible things to preserve it. In turn, I hope you guys are not going nuts thinking me irresponsible for shooting it at all. There's a happy medium in the middle.

Believe me, my boy and I are respectful of things like this to not abuse them. I'm happy as a clam and glad for the suggestions. I just hope you're not offended by my shooting it. Because it is going to happen.

It's all good! Thank you all again, very much.

Cheers,

John


Edit: m1a1fan nailed it. I may as well get a mixmaster and shoot that, if this was that delicate. And I would if I thought it was that delicate. It is not. I am trying to respect it by getting a new bolt and keeping original parts safely stored, and NOT shooting it much, and only with the replacement bolt. I just don't think keeping it in the safe most of the time, storing original parts, and shooting a couple hundred rounds a decade through it with my son in such a robust specimen is a sacrilege. I'm happy. I hope you guys are.

Last edited by JCinPA; 04-14-2019 at 10:17 PM.
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  #30  
Old 04-18-2019, 07:28 PM
JCinPA JCinPA is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 41
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Well, it's official! I suspected this was correct when I got it, not knowing very much, but based on cursory inspection and the story behind it.

I finally printed out the specs for mine based on SN at uscarbinecal30m1.com and looking over my photos, the N stamp on the front sight, the S stamp on the rear sight, the stampings on the stock (no rearsenaling marks), the W-I on the mag catch in the magwell, the UI on the barrel band ... this is clearly an unmodified, out the factory door gun with VERY little bore or muzzle wear (see the photo of the round sitting in the muzzle in the OP), which has been sitting in the suspended ceiling of the Chicago house for (probably) over 70 years. I didn't look at the stampings in the trigger group, but also based on the sling, I am quite certain, this thing is legit original. I could not be more excited.

I am very grateful for the suggestions to get a new bolt and to put the original bolt in storage with the sling and oiler (and original springs), and very grateful to the member here who is lending me his headspace gauges. Thanks to you all.

I'll headspace both the original and new bolt before returning the gauges, and I promise I'll baby this to death, but not promise not to shoot it at all, but from here on out it will only be shot by my son and I, and very rarely (maybe once in 5 years or more), and we'll have pads on the bench, clean and oil very thoroughly, store carefully, and I am going to try to get photos of the original owner in uniform and a bit of history on him from his widow.

What a lucky find! I will respect it for the historical gem that it is.

-John
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