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Old 08-13-2019, 11:04 AM
d.swider777 d.swider777 is offline
 
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Default Stock refinishing questions

Hey guys, planning on stripping my first walnut garand stock using purple power or citristrip and then finishing with Don's USSR stain and had a few questions. I've done some research and see that some people clean-off the purple power or citristrip with hot water, while others use plain mineral spirits. Is there an advantage in using water vs. mineral spirits? I'd like to use spirits if possible and avoid using water just because I'm concerned with what many people are saying about using water on stocks.

Iíve also read about several people using the ussr stain and then finishing with Toms 1/3 mix. I see where there is some debate about the use of the wax and was wondering anyone could tell me about their experience with it? Thanks guys!
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Old 08-13-2019, 12:42 PM
42Springfield 42Springfield is online now
 
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I've used this procedure on a handful of stocks to excellent results with no damage to the wood. I don't know if I'd do this to a really high end stock but for a run of the mill stock particularly one without expensive cartouches it works great.

1. Purple power, wait 10-15 minutes then rinse with BOILING water, outside, in the sun. The heat from the water will lift a lot of the minor dents and dings. Do not pour it directly on any cartouches or it will degrade them.
2. Let dry in the sun, which will happen very very fast due to the heat of the water and the sun. It will dry in just a few minutes instead of soaking in and causing any damage to the wood.
3. You may need to go over it very lightly with some fine sandpaper to knock down the wood grain which may have been raised during the cleaning. If you don't know what you're doing here this could be the point where you ruin your stock.
4. The next day, apply USSR stain.
5. The day after that, apply regular BLO, wait another day and do another.
6. Apply coats of Tom's 1/3 Mix every few days after until the desired appearance is achieved.

The end result of this finish is basically indistinguishable from USGI stocks I've received from CMP. And keep in mind there is a lot of variance in how untouched USGI wood looks based on what was done to it for the last 50-70 years, some is shinier, some is dry, some light, some dark.
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Old 08-13-2019, 02:16 PM
Fogtripper Fogtripper is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by d.swider777 View Post
Hey guys, planning on stripping my first walnut garand stock
To be honest, I would ask you why you are looking to strip it. If it is a USGI stock you are just removing it's valuable patina and then sealing it with a fake coloring, further reducing it's value.

Can we see pictures of what you are working with to better advise your course of action? The most invasive I would get with USGI wood is Minwax Antique Furniture Refinisher and perhaps a black trash bag in the sun to leech out the soaked in goo. That will clean the stock plenty, leave the existing patina that was under the grime, and is good for the wood. Then I would so a couple natural oil rubs. No waxes, no varnishes, no fake colorings, unless you plan on scuba diving with your Garand.
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Old 08-13-2019, 02:24 PM
navyrifleman navyrifleman is offline
 
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Mineral spirits might drive other chemicals deeper into the wood. If the directions for any given stripper say rinse with water, then that is how I would go. It really depends upon what kind of stripper you use.

I sometimes use Murphy's Oil soap and water to clean very dirty wood, allow it to dry, and then apply boiled linseed oil in very thin applications over several days.

I tend to agree with others in that less is better when it comes to caring for a wood gunstock.
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Old 08-13-2019, 03:34 PM
sparx sparx is online now
 
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I also would like to know why this stock is being refinished and see some images.
sparx
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Old 08-13-2019, 03:43 PM
Kestrel4k Kestrel4k is offline
 
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Speaking for myself, I also have a few stocks that are paused at the 'raised grain / fine sandpaper' stage, and am interested as to how the experienced members here would weigh in on that step.
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Old 08-13-2019, 03:51 PM
Shomway Shomway is online now
 
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If you're going to refinish/strip a stock, follow Orlando's method.....
http://forums.thecmp.org/showpost.ph...95&postcount=5

I've been using this method for years and found it's the best method to really get it clean of any oils. Let it thoroughly dry...I hang the stock up and let excess water drain down, and air dry away from direct heat(sun too). If you're going to sand the stock, nothing less than 180 grit paper. With the stock now cleaned, I've found this is the point that I will try and steam out any dents or dings.
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Old 08-13-2019, 03:53 PM
sparx sparx is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kestrel4k View Post
Speaking for myself, I also have a few stocks that are paused at the 'raised grain / fine sandpaper' stage, and am interested as to how the experienced members here would weigh in on that step.

rub it with a Scotch pad, purple or gray
sparx
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Old 08-13-2019, 04:04 PM
d.swider777 d.swider777 is offline
 
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I'll post pictures of the stock(s) later when I get time. It'd be good to see what everyone says about them



Thanks for all the response so far, I appreciate the help. The stocks I’m looking to work on are not collector stocks, they’re dirty and don’t have a nice patina like some do. I like the look of a clean stock over a dirty dark one, especially since there are no cartouches. I enjoy working on things and bringing life back to them, I just don’t have much experience doing it. I know everyone has their opinion and I do have a GAW stock that I will only do a light cleaning to, but I’d rather make ugly ones look nice again. I also have an MT stock that has some really nice grain and maybe some tiger stripes I’d like to bring to life.

I used Murphy’s on one and it didn’t do much to it. I then put it in a garbage bag and left it in my truck for our hottest weekend this summer, over 100 degrees each day, and it didn’t do much either. I cleaned one with mineral spirits and then did 7 coats of BLO and it didn’t add any color, was still that ugly grayish with a hint of brownish red. I feel like totally stripping them will be the only way to get life back to them the way i like.

3. You may need to go over it very lightly with some fine sandpaper to knock down the wood grain which may have been raised during the cleaning. If you don't know what you're doing here this could be the point where you ruin your stock.

Do you mean the sanding part or the next part of starting to add the stain? Never sanded a stock before, all I know is to go with the grain and use finer grit. Any advice on this? Thanks

Last edited by Big_Red; 08-13-2019 at 09:30 PM. Reason: Combine consecutive posts
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Old 08-13-2019, 04:05 PM
MLD MLD is offline
 
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I’m not big on refinishing any stock and have avoided doing so on all but a couple of mine. One in particular, a Greek return Mark1, was extremely filthy and had an offensive,musty,mildew smell. I took it to work and used a floor sink and turned the water on hot only. Probably around 130/140. I made a paste of TSP and laid it on. It melted the crud off down to raw wood. Most the dents and dings raised up, I didn’t spare the hot water. The cartouches looked a little messed up when the stock was wet, but dried nicely. Even had one change from from SA/ JLG to SA/JFC and looks untouched. Added ChestnutRidge stain and it turned out gorgeous. Not for everyone, but it works! Good kitchen gloves, eye protection, and long sleeved shirt are necessities.

Last edited by MLD; 08-13-2019 at 04:42 PM.
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