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  #1  
Old 09-06-2018, 06:53 AM
Col. Colt Col. Colt is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 285
Default New Production M1923 Sling -Beautiful and under $100

Just got my first RCI Starlite M1923 sling in the mail. I have two originals and this one is a truly excellent "re-production" item, done with original WWII care. The attention to detail, particularly in the weave of the material, the stitching and even the appearance of the metal hardware is very satisfying.

http://www.starlitedrums.com/product...e-AFC-940.html

Starlite was careful in marking the slings to prevent them being passed off as a NOS (New Old Stock) original (which I have seen sell for between $200-300 dollars!) - they have the original USGI "SM Company" logo at the right place along with "1942" but Starlight has also tastefully put their own WWII "American Fabrics Co." logo (complete with zip code) near it so nobody should be fooled by one of these excellent new production slings.

This is an awesome looking Sling - and was one of the three slings you could be issued in WWII. It also continued in US Ordnance Inventory at least into the 1950's - they are often found redyed the darker postwar OD green and with 1950's MRT (Mildew Resistant Treatment) markings - so the Army did NOT drop them after WWII, but kept them in inventory.

It is unknown how long American Fabric Co. and Starlight Drums will continue this item in production, so if you want a very nice sling you can actually afford and use, order it direct or through Ebay right now. And if enough people buy them - maybe they will stay in production! I am going to formally ask the CMP to legalize them as an official US Army Issue sling for all competitions - Because it WAS Issue! And it is a much better sling than the M1, or, after using one for a while (an original) I think it beats the M1907 leather sling, too.

CC

PS - The myth that this is somehow a complicated sling came about when the US War Department (not "Department of Defense" back then!) published incorrect assembly instructions about the M1923 in the soldier's issued Field Manuals - if you follow the manual you were issued in WWII, you may not ever get it on right. All it really is is an M1907 with buckles instead of hooks, which makes it infinitely adjustable, not limited by where they punched the holes! Give it a look. And for under $100 - get one (or more) while you can! CC

Last edited by Col. Colt; 09-06-2018 at 07:05 AM.
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  #2  
Old 09-06-2018, 10:16 AM
T38Carbine T38Carbine is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: WV
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I just received one and totally agree...excellent!! Do you have any “how to use” information?
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  #3  
Old 09-06-2018, 04:23 PM
Col. Colt Col. Colt is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 285
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Give these a look - I have a written description somewhere - but this may help while I look for it....

https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/para...ed-t38920.html

http://www.rollanet.org/~stacyw/us_m1923_sling.htm

http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=129354

CC

Last edited by Col. Colt; 09-06-2018 at 04:37 PM.
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  #4  
Old 09-08-2018, 01:38 PM
Chris_B Chris_B is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 335
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How is it as a shooter's sling? Looks to be quite capable, but I'd like some opinions.
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  #5  
Old 09-09-2018, 06:07 AM
Col. Colt Col. Colt is offline
 
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As a (relatively) expensive collector's item up until now that was very little known to the general shooting public, few living people have ever used an M1923 seriously - and the current Service Rifle Rules don't even mention/allow it - so who would use such a rare, hard to find item on the range?

But after working out with it through the positions on both a Springfield and an M1 (original M1923s I have - one khaki, one OD "MRT 1951") and having used both M1907 and the M1 slings most of my life (since about 11!) I think it really is the better mousetrap, tripped up during it's short life by "Old Army" tradition, bad instructions and circumstance.

It came about in the 1920's, when Military budgets were very small, and the warehouses were still full of M1907 and Kerr Slings from WWI. It was not produced in quantity until WWII, and then it's use was apparently not even properly described in the manuals - and the "Real Shooters" - the Marksmen of the era had all grown up and were trained with the readily available M1907 - and leather was THE Standard - and web is thought of as, well, cheap. So it never got a chance for a fair hearing - and if all you wanted was a Carry Strap, by 1944 the M1 was adequate for that.

But a very serious authority on the M1903, and an excellent writer on the subject in his book "The '03 Springfield Rifle's Era", Mr. Clark S. Campbell explains it's virtues this way - " The Sling, Gun, M1923 (webbing) (page 155 of the 2003 edition of his book) is arguably the best rifle sling the Army ever had. Although not as elegant as the M1907 leather sling of the small peacetime Army, at .413 pounds it is 25% lighter, is is equally good in having a "loop" that, once adjusted to the shooter, remains fixed in size; it's transformations between "parade" and "carrying" configurations is at least as quick; and it is definitely superior in that it's "loop" is a great deal quicker and easier for a shooter to position and secure on his upper arm for deliberate shooting. Also, of course, the fabric won't rot, stretch when wet, nor crack when dry. It is clearly better than the M1917 (webbing) sling in it's having a constant loop size, positive keeper clamping, and adjustable length of "tail"; and it is quite obviously vastly superior to the subsequent M1 (webbing) sling of WWII."

Right now you can buy a brand new M1923 sling, as good or better than original 1942 GI issue item, off of Ebay direct from the Connecticut, USA manufacturer for $69.00 (about a third of the cost of an original) and shipping. And it is actually being built in a WWII factory building that made Canvas goods for the US military in WWII - all American made, 1940's mil spec quality and all US sourced. If enough people try it and like it, we may have a new option for serious shooters - and if not, these new production slings will likely become collectable in and of themselves. I would not wait too long, if I was at all interested - I've seen lots of neat stuff reproduced as well or better than original (both for guns and cars) and one run was all that happened due to lack of proper promotion/interest - or "I'll get one later". This sling is of very high quality - and I hope it succeeds. CC
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  #6  
Old 09-09-2018, 08:55 AM
Chris_B Chris_B is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 335
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I don't want to compete in a service rifle match with it. I also don't worry about the functionality of the original item when I am buying a repro.

This reproduction can be perfectly 100% accurate to the original in all ways in which case vintage reports will apply.

Most likely there is some difference between this new non USGI accepted item and the original government furnished item. It is usually unavoidable; processes have changed and duplicating vintage processes is difficult at times and can be expensive. Having been involved professionally in the technical field of textiles ad composites I have some small experience with say, the cross wind technique and resulting spool from on a mechanical 100 year old winder being slightly different from a new, electro-mechanical high speed winder. In turn the current spools might be run at a higher speed than the 100 year old machine produced ones which can affect the resulting textile's appearance and texture. Denier may have also changed for example, which can affect the ability of the keepers to do what they do. Warp and weft may differ as well when comparing a textile from nearly a century ago to today's textile of the same general type.

Much like the reproductions of vintage car parts that cost thousands which I have purchased, I like to get as much info about this type of item before I purchase. Thank you for the synopsis.
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  #7  
Old 10-16-2018, 06:38 AM
Airedale Airedale is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 45
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I ordered one, last night,to mount on my M1C for an upcoming 10k Run-n-Gun. It sounds like a better option-we'll see.
$13.43 to ship a sling is hard to swallow though.
Dave
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  #8  
Old 10-19-2018, 09:55 PM
Col. Colt Col. Colt is offline
 
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Posts: 285
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Airedale, if you put the time in to learn it - takes about thirty minutes after initial setup - switching the straps/buckles/keeper around and learning how to configure it in Parade, Long and Short Carry and as a competition/real rifleman's sling is really very easy.
And you only have to set the main "loop" to your sizing once and then just leave it, when you go to put your arm through it, just give it a half twist like an M1907 and slide the keeper down and lock it. Nothing to it - and infinitely variable - unlike brass hooks! CC
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  #9  
Old 10-20-2018, 06:41 AM
Airedale Airedale is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Col. Colt View Post
Airedale, if you put the time in to learn it - takes about thirty minutes after initial setup - switching the straps/buckles/keeper around and learning how to configure it in Parade, Long and Short Carry and as a competition/real rifleman's sling is really very easy.
And you only have to set the main "loop" to your sizing once and then just leave it, when you go to put your arm through it, just give it a half twist like an M1907 and slide the keeper down and lock it. Nothing to it - and infinitely variable - unlike brass hooks! CC
I have it properly installed and will work with it this weekend. I believe it is a better sling and will likely buy a few more.
Thanks for the info
Dave
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  #10  
Old 10-20-2018, 08:04 AM
bruce bruce is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Georgia
Posts: 938
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Got an original in 1983 when I bought a nice 03. Later sold the 03 as it was nice, just swallowed field reject gauge. Oh well! The sling of course had no instructions. Was not hard to figure out how to use it. Simply an outstanding idea. Very much like it. About ideal for anything from the range and matches to the woods and fields. JMHO. Sincerely. bruce.
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