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  #1  
Old 12-10-2009, 10:09 PM
SaCCaL SaCCaL is offline
 
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Default Corrosive Ammo Questions...

I am sure these have been answered already but I have a few questions about corrosive ammo.

1. What date did the ammo finally become non-corrosive?
2. What makes ammo corrosive, the primer or the powder?
3. If the primer is the culprit, is it possible or recommended to disassemble the ammo and install a non-corrosive primer and reassemble it with the same powder and bullet?
4. How do you clean a gun after shooting corrosive ammo?

Thanks in advance for your answers. Have a great day.
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  #2  
Old 12-10-2009, 10:41 PM
Taroman Taroman is offline
 
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AFAIK:
1) Varies with manufacturer 1920s to 1950s.
2) The primer. Fulminate of Mercury, IIRC. (a salt, actually)
3) I wouldn't. YMMV.
4) Scrub everything with lots of hot soapy water, dry, finish cleaning, and oil well.
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Last edited by Taroman; 12-11-2009 at 06:30 PM.
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  #3  
Old 12-10-2009, 10:54 PM
bcarver bcarver is offline
 
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you could pull the bullets.
Dump the powder.
fire and remove primers(i don't like punching out live primers but you could).
reload with new primers and powder and use old bullets.
bullet pulling may be easy or impossible depending on crimp.
I WOULD NOT DO THIS.
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  #4  
Old 12-10-2009, 10:55 PM
Chunky Monkey Chunky Monkey is offline
 
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I acquired some LC 69 primed brass to reload. Primers are crimped, is this non-corrosive?
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  #5  
Old 12-11-2009, 07:23 AM
gpw9552 gpw9552 is offline
 
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RE #2

It is potassium cloride. Fulminate of mercury was phased out around 1905 with the developement by Frankford Arsenal of the H-48 primer. This was replaced by the Frankford Arsenal #70 primer in 1919 and used thru the early 1950's.

In the 10 years leading up to WWII, over 30 different non-corrosive primer patents were applied for. The government chose to stay with the FA #70 until thing sorted themself out.

This applied also to all military contract ammo (UMC, WCC, REM etc) except the .30 carbine.

BTW Fulmate of mercury only affected the brass cartridge case (made it brittle).
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  #6  
Old 12-11-2009, 08:32 AM
Buggsy Buggsy is offline
 
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Chunky, Lake City 1969 would not be corrossive.

The general opinion of the collecting community is that 1952 was the end of corrosive primers by US arsenals or producers for the .30

As for re-working any unfired military ammo, it could be very risky but certainly difficult. Primers and bullets are crimped into place. Trying to remove a live, crimped primer would not be for the weak of heart! You'll wear yourself and your bench out trying to use an inertia puller on crimped bullets and if you come across one of the old explosive projectiles.... well, it could be (and has been) a bad day. The risk and effort would not be worth it to me. Even the effort of depriming and reaming out the pockets of fired milspec brass is a pain to me but at least it won't blow up in my face.
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Old 12-11-2009, 09:40 AM
SaCCaL SaCCaL is offline
 
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Ok, thanks everyone for everyone's help. I guess it isn't worth it. Well, I thought I'd ask anyway, I wasn't real hopeful about it as I haven't read anything on the forum about someone doing it... Have a good day...
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  #8  
Old 12-11-2009, 10:02 AM
Scrounger Scrounger is offline
 
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I believe some of the match ammo into the late 50's was also corrosive.

Not sure where I saw it, but was looking up Frankford Arsenal Match ammo with color on the primer. My Dad bought some from the North Store dated 1961 and it is non corrosive.

I have yet to see the stuff, but it could be a merry Christmas!
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  #9  
Old 12-11-2009, 12:16 PM
rcolarco rcolarco is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bcarver View Post
you could pull the bullets.
Dump the powder.
fire and remove primers(i don't like punching out live primers but you could).
reload with new primers and powder and use old bullets.
bullet pulling may be easy or impossible depending on crimp.
I WOULD NOT DO THIS.
If you fire the primer, you have eaxctly the same cleaning problem as you would if you fired the ammunition itself. In fact, the problem is worse because the powder fouling serves to mitigate some of the corrosive effect. If you fire just the primer, you are dumping pure, undiluted potassium chloride into the bore.

Just shoot the stuff, clean the rifle, and reload the brass. This is what we used to do before corrosive ammunition became a bogeyman.

To clean corrosive residue, all you need is water. It does not have to be hot, it does not have to be soapy. Chemically, potassium chloride is very close to common table salt. At my doctor's orders, I use potassium chloride on my food. It's better for my arthritis than sodium chloride. You can buy it in a little blue Morton's container at the grocery store. I tried an experiment. Plain old cold tap water dissolves it just fine.
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Last edited by rcolarco; 12-11-2009 at 12:19 PM.
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  #10  
Old 12-11-2009, 02:34 PM
USSR USSR is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scrounger View Post
I believe some of the match ammo into the late 50's was also corrosive.
Yes, there was, I believe, one year (56 or 57) that FA Match ammo used corrosive primers, but by 1953, all the M2 Ball and M2 AP was noncorrosive.

Don
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