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  #11  
Old 12-11-2009, 04:24 PM
82nd Rigger 82nd Rigger is offline
 
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Unless you have a huge amount of corrosive ammo, just shoot it and enjoy doing so.

There is a chart available that shows the lot number and date when the makers of US military ammo switched to non-corrosive priming.

If you shoot ammo with corrosive priming, clean the rifle THE SAME DAY.
DO NOT WAIT UNTIL THE NEXT DAY.

Hot, soapy water, as hot as you can stand it. So hot that the metal will dry from the heat.

When dry, clean the bore and wipe everything down with Hoppe's.

WW2 bore cleaner removes corrosive salts pretty well. Came in little O.D. cans that fit into the pouch of a Garand or Springfield cartridge belt.

If you can stand using that stuff. It's got an odor that will knock a buzzard off of a dung heap.
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  #12  
Old 12-11-2009, 06:15 PM
Chunky Monkey Chunky Monkey is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buggsy View Post
Chunky, Lake City 1969 would not be corrossive.
Thanks Buggsy, I figured so but just wanted to be sure!!!
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  #13  
Old 12-13-2009, 03:53 AM
sunray sunray is offline
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1. What ammo? .30-06 was around 1952. Supposedly out of the U.S. military supply system a year or so later. U.S. made .30 Carbine never used corrosive primers. French made ball ammo in either should be treated as corrosive.
2. It's the primers.
3. Yes, but it's not worth the effort. Live primers, of any kind, can be removed by slowly running the case into the sizing die until the primer pops out. However, milsurp primers are crimped in. Not a suggested thing to do.
4. Flush the rifle, including the gas system, with just below boiling water(works a bit better than cold tap water. Mostly because metal heated with very hot water dries a bit faster) No scrubbing is required. Soap is most assuredly not required. Neither is Windex.
The CF gave us nothing but 10-30 motor oil to clean everything. Shot some truly fabulous 1944 vintage DA .303 ball ammo, long ago. No fuss. Mind you, motor oil did squat to carbon deposits. EZ-Off did. Frowned upon though.
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  #14  
Old 12-14-2009, 12:13 PM
tankerG tankerG is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gpw9552 View Post
RE #2

It is potassium cloride. Fulminate of mercury was phased out around 1905 with the developement by Frankford Arsenal of the H-48 primer. This was replaced by the Frankford Arsenal #70 primer in 1919 and used thru the early 1950's.
....BTW Fulmate of mercury only affected the brass cartridge case (made it brittle).
While we're on the subject of corrosive primers, perhaps somebody could confirm something I've heard. I've heard that corrosive primers - for all their "issues" - actually were the most reliable and long lasting types of primers. That statement seems to hold up - most of the ammo advertized as corrosive seems to be decades old, yet still fires reliably. Is brass embrittlement the only reason they switched to non-corrosive?
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  #15  
Old 12-14-2009, 12:16 PM
tankerG tankerG is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chunky Monkey View Post
Thanks Buggsy, I figured so but just wanted to be sure!!!
Great news! I've got some 69 LC black tip (I believe the consensus was they are Talon reloads), and wasn't sure if they were corrosive or not. No problem if they are - I don't "plink" with AP
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  #16  
Old 12-14-2009, 04:53 PM
gpw9552 gpw9552 is offline
 
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tankerG

1. Brittle brass was caused by mercury and that was removed from the priming compound in the early 1900's (FA H48 followed by FA #70).

2. Non-corrosive primer development was ongoing thru the 1930's (over 30 different patent applications) and nothing could be standardized until after WWII.
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  #17  
Old 12-17-2009, 12:04 AM
sierra77mk sierra77mk is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tankerG View Post
While we're on the subject of corrosive primers, perhaps somebody could confirm something I've heard. I've heard that corrosive primers - for all their "issues" - actually were the most reliable and long lasting types of primers. That statement seems to hold up - most of the ammo advertized as corrosive seems to be decades old, yet still fires reliably. Is brass embrittlement the only reason they switched to non-corrosive?
The compound used in corrosive primers makes them more reliable especially in cold weather. I guess that makes the primers more stable so they don't degrade/oxidize and are more reliable than non corrosive primers when stored for years.
The Russian-Polish-Bulgarian 1980's surplus 5.45x39 on the current market is corrosive. I guess longterm storage and cold weather reliability was more important to the Communists than barrel life.
They may still use corrosive primers in Russia far all we know.
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  #18  
Old 12-17-2009, 04:50 PM
Oohrah Oohrah is offline
 
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Tanker, those black tipped bullets are amour piercing, and most accurate with the exception of Match ammo. Used them for annual qualifications when we could find the match stuff. I really can't recall the dates of the Match Ammo, or if Frankfort or LC,
It was the issue for sniper rifles, Winchester Model 70s in 30-06 in the early Nam days.
I don't believe it was corrosive primed, but I used the old stinky bore cleaner of the 50s
on the rifle. I don't think anything survives once contact is made. Ammo issued by the case, and when you needed more, the rifle needed to be rezeroed. Ammo didn't seem to be a problem, but scopes that held up, and didn't end up fogging was an issue. I believe those black tipped AP rounds were 162 grain bullets, and the Match a bit heavier.
Maybe 172 ? Both very stable in a 1 in 10" barrel.
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  #19  
Old 12-17-2009, 08:25 PM
CNCprogrammer CNCprogrammer is offline
 
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If I remember correctly, I've read that the Germans developed a non-corrosive primer way before WWII (that's why you don't see 98k's with bores like '03 and 1917's). I have early WWII Nazi ammo that still shoots as well as US WWII corrosive ammo, or modern ammo.
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  #20  
Old 12-18-2009, 10:14 AM
ceresco ceresco is offline
 
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Sharpe's 1953 book "Complete Guide To Handloading" has a wealth of technical and historical information. He writes that by 1953 the government had stepped in and standardized all commercial primer formulas--"no difference" except in "look"s. Don't know how long that lasted. Good Shooting.......
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