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  #1  
Old 02-19-2019, 01:31 PM
M1tanker M1tanker is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 66
Default 1903 S Stock Replacement

Recently acquired a very nice Mark I. However stock has a hairline crack on the straight grip. Im either going to repair or replace, any suggestions as to sources of new or USGI stocks? Thanks.
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  #2  
Old 02-19-2019, 05:22 PM
Mark1 Mark1 is offline
 
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Location: Florida
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I would make the repair. A hair line crack is an easy fix.
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  #3  
Old 02-19-2019, 06:37 PM
navyrifleman navyrifleman is offline
 
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I recently repaired two 03A3 stocks with the same type of crack. The problem is a very common one, but you can safely repair and restore such stocks.

What I did was to first force the crack open VERY carefully by taking a Socket (from a socket wrench set) that was just slightly larger than the area forward of the crack, and very carefully (and slowly) compress it down into the stock using a "C" clamp.

This gives you a controlled spread of the crack, and allows you the use of your hands to do the next steps.

With the crack opened slightly, I injected some Gorilla Glue (using a hypodermic syringe and fairly large needle) into the crack until filled.

Next, I removed the C clamp and socket, and clamped the grip of the stock (on right and left sides) very tightly using two pieces of wood between the C clamp metal and the stock wood. You have to do this, or the Gorilla Glue will force the crack open as it cures.

Check on the stock and wipe away any oozing glue. About 24 hours later, remove the clamp, and the stock is as strong as new. The crack will be barely visible if you have clamped it correctly. Any excess glue which has oozed out will have hardened and can be scraped away.

The 03A3 and 1903 stocks originally came with a steel sleeve in the hole where the rear guard screw goes. Check your stock to make sure it has one. One possible cause for these cracks is looseness of the guard screws, or a missing sleeve.
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  #4  
Old 02-19-2019, 06:39 PM
M1tanker M1tanker is offline
 
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Im leaning in that direction simply due to lack of an available replacement. It is a beautiful stock otherwise.
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  #5  
Old 02-19-2019, 07:06 PM
pickax pickax is online now
 
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Location: Daytona Beach Fla.
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A 'hairline crack' Shouldn't be spread open. Lock tight 420 will 'wick' in to the crack without spreading it first. Then clamp tight. if clamping before hand closes it, then this is the way to go.
No pics,and not doubting the above fix worked for him, gorilla glue would't be my choice.
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  #6  
Old 02-19-2019, 07:09 PM
M1tanker M1tanker is offline
 
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I was going to use a couple of threaded brass pins to pull it together with a light coat of blo mix to completely seal interior against moisture. Admittedly, I’ve never tried this before but I believe it will give a good strong repair.
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  #7  
Old 02-19-2019, 10:03 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is online now
 
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Location: AL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M1tanker View Post
I was going to use a couple of threaded brass pins to pull it together with a light coat of blo mix to completely seal interior against moisture. Admittedly, Ive never tried this before but I believe it will give a good strong repair.
There are many threads here and on other forums regarding milsurp stock repair. I suggest you don't reinvent the wheel but either do some research or perhaps find someone experienced to help you or do the work for you.
  • BLO is not a glue.
  • Putting oil IN a crack will make it very hard for anyone to use glue in that crack later.
  • Pins are often good, but are not as repair without glue.
  • No one can give you specific advice without examining the actual stock or seeing pictures.
  • Gorilla glue works well for many things. But most would use another glue on stocks. I have repaired a few stocks with it, it was worth trying. But I'll stick with epoxy for most uses.

Post some photos, you might get some good advice.

This guy's not the brightest but you may get some ideas of what not to do:
http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=158125&page=6

JH
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  #8  
Old 02-20-2019, 02:30 AM
M1tanker M1tanker is offline
 
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Thanks everyone for taking the time to answer. Once I figure out how to post pics I will show before and after repair efforts.
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  #9  
Old 02-20-2019, 08:20 AM
navyrifleman navyrifleman is offline
 
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I second the statement that you do NOT want to get any oil into the crack, as the glue will likely not stick.

EPOXY is probably the best overall glue to use for any kind of wood repair, but it is hard to inject through a hypodermic syringe and needle, and it sets up very quickly. In most other cases, where you can easily get to the area needing glue, I prefer EPOXY to Gorilla glue.

Gorilla glue has somewhat limited use in my experience, and absolutely has to be clamped very evenly over the entire repair area or you end up with a mess. It wants to spread out as it cures.

Gorilla glue, however, is very consistent and fluid when in a container (like a syringe). I found it very easy to inject into this type of crack. Note that I only spread the crack wide enough to insert a needle. And I immediately removed the spreader and then clamped the grip to keep constant pressure on the crack while the Gorilla glue cured.

If such a grip crack is left unrepaired, it will spread (get longer). This had happened with one of the two I recently repaired.

While screws can be used to repair stocks, it involves drilling holes and changing the original nature of the stock. Sometimes this is necessary, but in the case of this type of crack, you are better off if you just glue the crack. The repair will be just as strong, and probably not noticable if done right. With a screw or pin, or any drilling, it will be a very visible repair, or will require cosmetic follow up work.
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  #10  
Old 02-20-2019, 04:19 PM
navyrifleman navyrifleman is offline
 
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Is your stock an original Mark I? If so, it would be contoured slightly on the left side to clear below the oval receiver cut of the Mark I receiver. It would also not have a cut for an 03A3 receiver ring.

If it is an original Mark I stock, all the more reason to repair rather than replace it.
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