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  #11  
Old 01-16-2020, 07:47 PM
Deuceguy Deuceguy is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Northfield, OH
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SF, you can thank the few bubbas who cost some of the manufacturers enough money to say no more. Unfortunately, the few ruined it for the many who are perfectly capable of building. I've witnessed and took part in enough discussions to have experience in these situations.
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  #12  
Old 01-16-2020, 08:11 PM
Sheeple Fighter Sheeple Fighter is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: MN (central)
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It would be cool if the CMP would offer a M14 builders course sponsored by one of the remaining receiver producers. Would breath some more life back into the platform.

Soon we will be left with just Legos and padded rooms.
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feedback thread
http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=139123
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  #13  
Old 01-17-2020, 12:45 AM
loub loub is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheeple Fighter View Post
I just checked LRB’s website and they are selling the M25 receivers by themselves. Looks like LB and Fulton are your only options right now.

I don’t buy this bubba talk. There are a lot of individuals on this forum who build garands, and are not blaming the “original” Springfield Armory, H&R, IHC, and Winchester if the build goes south. In fact you almost never hear of a build gone bad. Most of us can reasonably well spin on a barrel, time it, ream the chamber, and headspace. Why does it work, these receivers are made to USGI specs. I suspect if Uncle Sam let us have some USGI M14 receivers there would be little to no complaint about builds not working out. Issue is as we all know, ALL M14-type commercial receivers are not USGI spec and will have fitting issues.

Answers have been given to he OP about available receivers. Let’s not judge his skill set, they might be a master M14 builder.
Would like to make everyone aware that people who build Garands using "original" Springfield Armory, H&R, IHC and Winchester receivers are building on a receiver that was already a rifle. All the bugs and warts have been worked out by the original builders...not to mention, weapon went through combat. This would be why you almost never hear of a build gone bad.

No one knows how many original M1 receivers had issues during manufacture and were rejected before being built into a rifle. All manufacturers have rejects. It is my belief that every existing G.I. M1 Garand receiver out there is buildable if not excessively worn or damaged, and it is still in spec.

Speaking for LRB Arms, I believe our M14SA receivers are the closest to mil spec in machining detail, dimensions, forging process, heat treat process and phosphating. Building a M14 rifle using our stripped receiver requires fitting of parts by a competent M14 armorer, just as was done building those original M1's back in the day. LOU
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  #14  
Old 01-17-2020, 08:53 AM
nf1e nf1e is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 2,433
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Thanks for having our back Lou. You are more than appreciated.
Love the speedy service when parts are ordered from your operation.
Top quality and fast, can't beat that.
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  #15  
Old 01-17-2020, 07:46 PM
DougS DougS is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 432
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My $.02 is that based on building Springfield, Armscorp, Fulton and Bula, Fulton has given me the least issues.
The most recent of the manufacturers had given me issues with their bolts not fitting the receiver, and with a barreled receiver having a barrel so far off it was shot 15" or more at 100 yards, i.e. off a standard 100 yard target paper. This same barreled receiver went back to them twice, the first for headspace and the second for this barrel cant issue.
I will say they made everything right, and the latest had no issues whatsoever.

So, as said previously, they all have had growing pains to work thru, and based on who is left, some have not survived the market place because of their recurring quality issues.
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  #16  
Old 01-21-2020, 04:20 PM
Ted Brown Ted Brown is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Jacksonville, OR
Posts: 548
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At the very minimum I recommend that anyone wanting to assemble a new M14 type rifle should have the barrel installed by a competent armorer. Anyone wanting to install their own barrel needs to have both the proper tools and experience to get this critical part of the assembly done right. The rest of the job is fairly straight forward. I'd also recommend Jerry Kuhnhausen's shop manual as a bible on how to do it.

I've had a working relationship with several manufacturers. I've worked with Lou at LRB Arms since 2002 with a small part in the development of their receiver. Like all makers, LRB had some issues early on, but they were quick to correct any problems that came up and constantly worked to improve their product. For some time LRB has produced the finest commercial M14 receiver available. Other companies have tried to get LRB to produce receivers that they could put their name on and call their own. LRB refuses to do this as the LRB mark is their testament to the high quality standard they have always maintained.
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  #17  
Old 01-21-2020, 05:27 PM
gjungle56 gjungle56 is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NE Illinois
Posts: 59
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Its understandable to me that some want the back end of a real GI M14 for the markings but if it were up to me I'd weld on the front half. That way you get good barrel timing/threads, good lock lug contact without lapping, and lock lugs in right position relative to receiver face(right place for proper head space on GI barrel)
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  #18  
Old 01-25-2020, 03:31 PM
Ted Brown Ted Brown is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Jacksonville, OR
Posts: 548
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You may have a good point there about the front half. Only problem is the front half has a small groove, the connector rod way, milled under the front of the right rail. This is restricted by ATF regulations as one of the three features of the M14 machine gun receiver making it illegal. I doubt anyone would ever check, but...
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  #19  
Old 02-07-2020, 11:01 AM
Ma Deuce Ma Deuce is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Daytona Beach,Fla
Posts: 30
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Could people be getting out of selling M-14 Receivers because of the lack of M-14 surplus Kits on the market? For a while we had plenty and cheap to,Now I have seen them in excess of $1,000 if you can fine a USGI kit and thats minus the Barrel and Bolts.
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  #20  
Old 02-07-2020, 01:44 PM
nf1e nf1e is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Connecticut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ma Deuce View Post
Could people be getting out of selling M-14 Receivers because of the lack of M-14 surplus Kits on the market? For a while we had plenty and cheap to,Now I have seen them in excess of $1,000 if you can fine a USGI kit and thats minus the Barrel and Bolts.
There are many reasons suppliers have been getting out of the receiver business. Cost of production is difficult to recover. Then the liability of someone unfamiliar getting one and bubbaing the rifle then making it sound like the manufacturer was a fault. This happens more often than not. These are not ARs.
I don't think there is really a shortage of surplus kits. They seem to show up quite a bit. Dupage sold some for $400 and then $500 a short time ago. You just have to be fast on the trigger finger or the resellers grab them. I think there are many CMP kits that folks bought and stashed just waiting to find a good home.
Complete kits turn up often that include barrel, bolt and stock and run in the $1000. to $1300. range.
If one is looking for a kit, the best thing to do is place a wanted add on a couple of forums and ask for response via PM. Just beware that there are rip off artists that patrol such places.
When in need , there are many enthusiasts that enjoy helping out like minded folks.
As Ted Brown suggests, it is a good idea to have a competent armorer do the barrel and headspace of the assembly, then pretty much anyone with reasonable mechanical abilities can finish it off.
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Last edited by nf1e; 02-07-2020 at 01:53 PM.
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