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  #11  
Old 05-24-2010, 12:49 PM
mousegun mousegun is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dtbach View Post
I've been shooting BP for years. I agree that "boiling water" is overkill and can actually be detrimental. Just warm water and lots of it will do. The best cleaner I've found for BP is Balistol and I'm sure it will work for corrosive primers too. Dilute it 10:1 in water since the water is what does the real cleaning. The balistol then forms a coating which protects the barrel from rust. I think it basically neutralizes any salt that might be left. At least none of my BP guns have had even a spec of rust on them since I started using balistol.
Second the motion.

Ballistol mixed 1:9 with water (a.k.a. moosemilk) forms a saponified mixture that attacks fouling, has some effect on copper and dissolves KCl salts. When the water dries out it leaves a polarized oil deposit. I use a field kit that includes a small perfume spritzer and a small bottle of straight Ballistol. Right after shooting everything gets spritzed and wiped. Additional cleaning is done after returning from the field. For corrosive smokless, Ed's Red is used, then the bore, bolt and gas system is wiped with Ballistol. For percussion firearms I stick with Ballistol.

Good stuff.
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  #12  
Old 05-30-2010, 06:37 PM
Sly One Sly One is offline
 
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Water based products I've been using for years for cleaning up after black powder shooting are Windex or Windex with vinegar and Thompson Center No. 13 Bore Cleaner. If nothing else all are handy for carrying into the field, and they do attack potassium compounds.
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  #13  
Old 06-11-2010, 03:50 PM
OldEyes OldEyes is offline
 
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Great post but an inordinate waste of time. I'fe fired corrosive ammo exclusively in my old Mosens and K98s. I run two patches of Windex with Ammo D down the bore, follow up with my normal bore cleaning methods and have never once had rust in or on any of my weapons and I've fired A LOT of corrosive amm through these many years. You can't ignore the corrosive aspect of the primers but good gosh this guys cleaning his weapon for a week after he goes to the range. Not going to put corrosive down my Garand just because I don't want to take apart the gas system every time I go to the range
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  #14  
Old 06-17-2010, 01:21 PM
PerryJeff PerryJeff is offline
 
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Good post Steve... One other method for your flushing is laundry detergent. This is/was the main cleaning method back in the 80's for the Marine Corp. break down the rifles in deep sink with warm water. Pick up part pour some powdered soap on it take brushe scrub to good lather let set pick up next let set 10 min or so. Then flush well with warm water let dry in sun then oil up well. Next day clean with normal cleaning solvents and oil after the pores in the metal will drink tons of oil... This works great for all BP also.
The old saying " Tide was designed with machinegunners in mind"...
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  #15  
Old 07-18-2010, 04:29 PM
Oprod30 Oprod30 is offline
 
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OK OK I am late posting this but I had a hip replaced and I was doing other things. Back in '06 I bought about 4 cases of KA 72 & 73. The stuff works great and as a general rule, I treat all ammo as corrosive; that prompts me to clean the weapon as soon as I get back home. If I do not do a complete cleaning, I will swab the bore with a few wet patches and lay it horizontal till the next a.m.. I usually do a complete clean as gas residue builds up on the oprod piston and the gas port in the barrel gets kinda skanky also.
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  #16  
Old 08-17-2010, 02:53 PM
.Steve. .Steve. is offline
 
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I would note the observation that my "cleaning methods" are perhaps long and boring. When I wrote the piece I intended mainly to relate the chemistry and mechanism that creates rusting with corosively primed ammunition.

I also noted a way, not the only way, but a way, to go about cleaning so that the bore would stay bright and shinny through extended use of corrosive ammo. So if you have a better way or an easier one, fine with me. I did carefully explain what works for me and why in technical terms. As a practical matter, the day to day delay is just to let the bore cleaner work. It only takes a few minutes each day to dry and re-wet the bores.

My observation has been that most rifles used with corrosive ammo over a long period of time are browned in the bore, freckled with rust, or actually frosted and pitted from corrosion. Perhaps not from one firing, but over time, sooner or later, they turn into a mess. Ditto the bolt face and firing pin tip. Pitted and corroded.

Since I was starting with pristine new condition Mauser and M91/30 barrels, I didn't want to mess them up. So I developed the system I explained above after researching enough to understand the chemistry. My bores remain as new after several fires made with wood from ComBloc ammo crates covering the tin cans inside.

As to copper fouling, if a bore fouls with copper, the copper has to go. Or else the corrosive salts are trapped under the copper and eventually eat up the steel. I have found that the M98 and M91/30 barrels are so well finished inside that they rarely copper foul. But I look for it.
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  #17  
Old 05-06-2011, 10:28 PM
mosin10 mosin10 is offline
 
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I would use caution shooting corrosive out of a somewhat valuable semi-auto rifle. I would not and do not hesitate to shoot corrosive out of pistols and bolt action rifles. I think there are waaaay too many internet rumors. Please do not listen to the guys giving you these crazy complicated cleaning techniques. Cleaning too much or too roughly will damage your firearm much more quickly than corrosive ammo will.

I have never had rust or corrosion in any gun (while I have owned it). I would never put water or windex down my barrel. My advice would be to clean it using hoppes elite (5.00 at Walmart) and be sure it is well oiled. Don't spend too much time cleaning, shoot your gun and enjoy it.
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  #18  
Old 10-08-2011, 11:44 PM
jabbo jabbo is offline
 
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Having shot lots (several thousand rounds) of corrosive milsurp ammo in a hungry 8mm milsurp weapon, I've found that simply scouring the barrel bore with a wire brush and room temperature water is sufficient to remove the corrosive salts - attention should be paid to the bolt and other parts, of course, and after cleaning it's a good idea to check the barrel and bolt and any other part (flash hider, etc.) every day for several days to make sure that all those nasty salt compounds have been washed away.

Then treat the weapon to a standard non-corrosive ammo cleaning.

Last edited by jabbo; 10-08-2011 at 11:46 PM.
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  #19  
Old 10-09-2011, 06:09 AM
X Hunter X Hunter is offline
 
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"Will water cleaning prevent all damage? In general, no. Military experience……"

"Remember, with consistent good cleaning practices, corrosive ammo does no harm."

The sticky seems to contradict itself.
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  #20  
Old 10-09-2011, 02:52 PM
mosin10 mosin10 is offline
 
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It is insane to put water in your barrel. Just clean with hoppes elite once and oil well. There is soo much internet hype about cleaning after corrosive ammo. There are also many more "experts" who will tell you to use windex, hot water, cold water, cooking oil, fried chicken grease, etc. For some reason it seems like a good percentage of gun guys know everything there is to know about everything.

Clean with hoppes eilite, oil the gun. Spend your time on shooting and not on cleaning. If you have a very valuable gun, you probably don't want to shoot old mil surp out of it anyway.
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