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  #21  
Old 07-10-2020, 08:43 AM
Rick the Librarian Rick the Librarian is offline
 
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Yes, I have no doubt - my sole interest is just to see if one (or more) showed up, whether in auction or "luck of the draw".
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  #22  
Old 07-10-2020, 12:21 PM
Doubs43 Doubs43 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jakeroub View Post
Hate to break it to you, but 450517 is more like Jan '42.
Yes, it would seem to be January, 1942. Not sure where I got June, 1940, but thanks for the correction.
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  #23  
Old 07-11-2020, 08:36 AM
Kissfan113 Kissfan113 is offline
 
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The field grade i just recieived 7/3 is a SA 229,704 pretty much the receiver is the only 41 part i can discern as original issue era parts
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  #24  
Old 07-11-2020, 08:40 AM
Rick the Librarian Rick the Librarian is offline
 
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That's pretty normal ... my first M1 from CMP some (gasp!) 20+ years ago was #335652 - the only "original" part was the receiver.
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  #25  
Old 07-12-2020, 07:45 AM
navyrifleman navyrifleman is offline
 
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Finding a Pre WW II M1 Garand that had been in the Philippines before the Japanese take over of the country in April/May 1942 would be a very difficult task.

There were some American troops who made it out of the Philippines on Airplanes, a Submarine, and on one ship - SS McTann (carrying wounded). But most weapons were left for use by those fighters left behind.

The Japanese probably captured most of the M1 rifles in country at the time, and most of those (if not all of them) were probably sent to Japan early on. It is known that the Japanese tried to make a semi-automatic rifle of their own which resembled in some ways the M1.

Of course, some of those M1 rifles, went into use by Guerilla Resistance fighters and continued in use against the Japs. It is possible that some of those rifles might eventually have ended up back in the hands of the Philippine government after the war, but they would generally have been well worn and in poor condition.

I inspected a large cache of Japanese Arisakas which had gone through the war on Truk and then were in storage on Saipan and saw first hand what tropical conditions can do to a rifle.

As others have pointed out, one would need some sort of documentation and provenance to accurately state that a given M1 Garand was in use in pre-war Philippines. One original source document which might help to prove such a claim would be transfer records which indicate the serial numbers of M1 Garand rifles shipped to the Philippine Army.

Last edited by navyrifleman; 07-12-2020 at 07:51 AM.
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  #26  
Old 07-12-2020, 08:27 AM
Rick the Librarian Rick the Librarian is offline
 
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As I said at the start, it would be a real "needle in a haystack", that's for sure. I'm aware of all the facts you mentioned. Below is a picture of two Philipine guerrillas, one with an M1 probably left over from those brought over in 1941.

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Last edited by Rick the Librarian; 07-12-2020 at 08:29 AM.
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  #27  
Old 07-13-2020, 08:00 AM
navyrifleman navyrifleman is offline
 
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The rifle on the right appears to be a US Model 1917 rifle. A lot of them (made in the US during World War I) were distributed throughout the Pacific area to native resistance groups. The M1 in the photo was probably one of the Pre-war Garands sent to the Philippines.

The felt campaign hat and the Brodie helmet were standard US Army issue before WW II.
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  #28  
Old 07-13-2020, 08:33 AM
Rick the Librarian Rick the Librarian is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by navyrifleman View Post
The rifle on the right appears to be a US Model 1917 rifle. A lot of them (made in the US during World War I) were distributed throughout the Pacific area to native resistance groups. The M1 in the photo was probably one of the Pre-war Garands sent to the Philippines.

The felt campaign hat and the Brodie helmet were standard US Army issue before WW II.
I've made a pretty good study of weapons in the Philippines. Actually, about 220,000 M1917s were sold to the Philippine Commonwealth Government in the late 1930s and was used to equip the Philippine National Army. They were too big, too big a recoil and had mechanical problems, but they were all that were to be had.

M1 Garands were issued to the Philippine Scout infantry and cavalry, which were a part of the Regular U.S. Army. Below is a captured Japanese photograph taken shortly after the fall of Bataan, that shows a small number of the weapons surrendered. Note the large stock of M1917s. Filipino guerrillas went through the Bataan peninsula after the fighting ended and picked up quite a few discarded weapons. You can see, if you look carefully, several other types of American weapons, including a couple of M1s in the picture. The artillery in the background are so-called "British 75s", mostly on old-fashioned wheels, that equipped artillery in the Philippines.

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Last edited by Rick the Librarian; 07-13-2020 at 08:38 AM.
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  #29  
Old 07-13-2020, 04:03 PM
Skeet6 Skeet6 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ma Deuce View Post
Rick,Did the GCA examine any these rifles when they came back ?Maybe if you asked them someone may have a idea if any in that range came back.
Yes we did. The rifles were spread all throughout the serial number ranges. We did 3 separate articles in the GCA Journal, 2 in Summer 2018 issue - "Phillipine Rifles Come Home" and "1960's Rebuilds of the Philippine Returns", and one in Spring 2019 "The Abu Sayyaf M1's".


Here is a video on the research trip by Marty Morgan.

https://thegca.org/the-cmp-and-the-philippine-garands/


Mike B
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Last edited by Skeet6; 07-14-2020 at 03:20 AM.
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