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  #1  
Old 09-19-2018, 03:51 PM
waynewash waynewash is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Ocean pines, Md.
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Default Is this 1943 Garand basically correct?

I recently picked up a 1943 Springfield Garand serial# 17834XX
Barrel SA-7-43
Op rod - 036382 6SA
Bolt - D28287 12 SA 06 diamond
trigger group - D28290-12-SA

sights are newer DRC
Stock is GI with circle P proof on pistol grip.

What do I have?
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  #2  
Old 09-19-2018, 04:22 PM
Shomway Shomway is offline
 
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Location: Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waynewash View Post
I recently picked up a 1943 Springfield Garand serial# 17834XX
Barrel SA-7-43
Op rod - 036382 6SA
Bolt - D28287 12 SA 06 diamond
trigger group - D28290-12-SA

sights are newer DRC
Stock is GI with circle P proof on pistol grip.

What do I have?
Top parts sounds correct for a 1.7, but could use more details. And would need more details on the stock.....pics would be a big help.
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  #3  
Old 09-19-2018, 07:18 PM
aimit aimit is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Northern California
Posts: 2,345
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Some of the parts you list are correct, but there are a lot more things to look at before anyone could tell you if the rifle is basically correct. Is the op rod uncut? If not, it is not correct. You list the drawing number for what you call a "trigger group" but that number is only for the housing. There is no way to know if the complete assembled group is correct without knowing what the other parts, such as the hammer, trigger, safety, and hammer spring plunger are. It sounds like you have a nice rebuilt rifle with a correct barrel and bolt and maybe some other correct parts which would be a good start if you want to restore the rifle to an "all correct" status.
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  #4  
Old 09-20-2018, 03:51 PM
rudedog1 rudedog1 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: San Antonio Tx
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Check out ,USRIFLECAL30M1.COM they have a site where you can search the Mfg. , part number's to find out the date of production.
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  #5  
Old 09-20-2018, 04:08 PM
ESWL ESWL is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: North Georgia Mountains
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I sold a correct October 1943 M1 on GunBroker and put together this album showing the correct parts. The first 4 pictures are a worksheet of the parts. The remaining photos are of each part. This is just to give you and idea of what is involved in determined if a gun is correct.

October 1943 Garand
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  #6  
Old 09-20-2018, 04:44 PM
Orlando Orlando is offline
 
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Location: Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rudedog1 View Post
Check out ,USRIFLECAL30M1.COM they have a site where you can search the Mfg. , part number's to find out the date of production.
You cannot rely solely on that site as some information is not correct
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  #7  
Old 09-20-2018, 06:36 PM
freelancer99 freelancer99 is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 15
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Well go out and buy a bunch of new parts, and what you end up with is a rifle that is definitely NOT correct, and one that has permanently lost all connection to it's past.
Sorry, but we are quickly "correcting" ourselves to a point where we will no longer be able to find or can no longer identify authentic Garands.
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  #8  
Old 09-20-2018, 10:53 PM
aimit aimit is offline
 
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Location: Northern California
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Add freelancer to the list of people who have no idea what Garand collecting is all about. A lot people are satisfied with a mixmaster shooter, but if all the well known collectors had been satisfied with that, we would know very little about these rifles. Restoring rifles back to all correct condition is, and always has been, a big part of Garand collecting. I don't know what "lost all connection to it's past" means. Does it mean nothing should be changed on any Garand because doing so would alter history? History is ongoing. Any thing done to a rifle just adds another step in its history. There are many ways to enjoy Garand collecting and I believe everyone has the right to do what they want with thier own property. If a person wants to restore a rifle back to all correct parts, then he should be able to do so without someone posting sarcastic remarks about it. If someone wants to grind off the sights and alter the stock to make some kind of modified hunting rifle he should be allowed to do that as well. It's none of my business and no one else's what a person does with his own rifle.
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  #9  
Old 09-24-2018, 01:56 AM
freelancer99 freelancer99 is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 15
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Wow, I made your list of people, and I was told what Garand collecting is "all about".
My point is you don't learn anything from restoring rifles, one learns from studying many Un-Altered correct rifles. The problem is when those new to M1s buy a blue and red book and immediately start to correct their new rifles without understanding both sides of the discussion.
The history of Garand study/ collecting is rich with examples, especially concerning the early IHC and HRAs where rifles thought to not be original were "corrected" and later discovered to be a very rare variation. I'll explain what "lost all connection to it's past" means. Once we start messing with these rifles it becomes much harder trace their history. You say history is ongoing, true, but no one is going to care about the story of that rifle once you get hold of it. Period.
We are creating hundreds of perfect WW2 clones that now have no story because you built it in your garage.
None of my comments were sarcastic. I'm merely suggesting that if one is truly interested, that they take the much more difficult but ultimately more rewarding path and seek out the genuine article, that what you hold will be a one of a kind that really did help change the course of the twentieth century.
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  #10  
Old 09-24-2018, 08:34 AM
k98dave k98dave is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Fort Worth Tx
Posts: 37
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Interesting conversation, however to add a twist, lets not confuse "originality" with "correct configuration" My Dad was ord tech during late ww2 and again in Korea and years ago when I got my first DCM rifle he went thru it with me as we talked about his work at the time. Bottom line is during the war, or even after parts were replaced as needed with no regard for "originality" or date of mfg. The next part out of the box went on to return the weapon to service asap. One may have a rifle with all the identified dwg numbers that align with the s/n date of mfg window, but saying its the "original" part as it left S/A, Win, HRA or IHC is wishful thinking. Not saying there not out there, but odds are very high that its all in the eye of the beholder. So now all the "experts" can jump me but like it or not that's the facts jacks

Last edited by k98dave; 09-24-2018 at 09:03 AM.
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