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  #11  
Old 01-07-2020, 05:00 PM
Orlando Orlando is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by broomhandle View Post
Hi All,



Can I /WE ever recoup the amount of money we drop into a mismatched firearm to at least break even.

Thanks for any thoughts on this subject,
broomhandle
Depends on what era the rifle is from and if you selling the complete rifle or breaking it down and selling parts
Early rifles are difficult and very expensive to correct, late rifles much easier and cheaper
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  #12  
Old 01-07-2020, 07:30 PM
broomhandle broomhandle is offline
 
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Location: Augusta GA- X NYC guy
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Hi Guys,

We know they are not going to make any more old rifles that's for sure!
I'm mainly interested in the 1903 & 03-A3's. Mine are as issued, from the CMP. Honestly ,I have not looked to see if the others are even close!

This last one A 1903 Remington Modified is almost correct, think there are only two or three parts that are not correct. At present, I don't see buying a second rifle to correct the first one.
It would be nice to have a all correct rifle, but at what cost?

I can see myself becoming addicted to correct but I learned with HOT Rods very rarely if ever, did it pay off in the long run.
Worse example was blowing up a engine in VA. & we had to hitch hike home to NYC! Calling for money from our parents was NEVER even thought of back then !

My pal & I shot the vintage Springfield match this year with two of the A3's.
We did not win or show but we did not finish in the last group.
I have a few Garand's & a very nice 7 mm Remington 1910 rolling block that might have been WW-1 Navy service. I have both the long & short Remington bayonets for it.

Thank you ALL, for sharing your thoughts on this subject,
broom
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  #13  
Old 01-08-2020, 02:22 AM
Milsurp Collector Milsurp Collector is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by broomhandle View Post
Hi All,

My question is:

Can I /WE ever recoup the amount of money we drop into a mismatched firearm to at least break even.
Generally no. Unless you misrepresent the firearm as original and get some gullible person to pay the price of an original for a "corrected" gun.

If you want an original or "correct" firearm, buy one. Unfortunately, because of the obsessive "correcting" that has been going on it's sometimes hard to be confident a USGI firearm is original.
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  #14  
Old 01-08-2020, 12:05 PM
broomhandle broomhandle is offline
 
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Hi M C,

Thanks for your well worded reply. I have to think, where I want to be on this subject
My work back-round is practical. Make it work safely & correctly, it does not have to chrome plated. As the old Hot Rodder's said "All Show & No GO!"

Thanks to you & all the other posters for honest reply's,
broom
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  #15  
Old 01-08-2020, 12:37 PM
Milsurp Collector Milsurp Collector is offline
 
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I'm running out of room in my private messages so I'll answer here if you don't mind.

Quote:
Originally Posted by broomhandle

Unless the finish of the corrected parts is off by a mile.
How would a savvy collector or Mister Average, know the firearm was corrected? At that point how much does it really matte in price?
I'm sure not many rifles/ firearms have been packed away in the original shipping case since 1945.
"IF" it can be proved, then I can see a premium price for the firearm.
It depends on what firearms you are talking about. American military long arms tended to be kept in service for long periods of time, making it likely they were arsenal rebuilt/repaired one or more times. So a truly original Garand or M1903 for example is rare. So if you encounter one that is "correct", it is likely it was "corrected" by some civilian.

But there are exceptions. By the time 03-A3s were produced in quantity the M1 Rifle was established as the primary service rifle so the 03-A3s were little used, mostly by military police and rear echelon troops. At the end of World War II most were in excellent or new condition. Many appear to have gone through the arsenal process at the end of the war with just an inspection before being put into storage and then disposed of as surplus.

Handguns were not main battle weapons so they tended not to see much wear and tear, especially if they were produced toward the end of World War II. They are also small and easy to remove from government ownership, allowing some to avoid the arsenal rebuilding process. So it is more likely to find an original M1911A1 or 03-A3 out in the wild than an M1 Rifle or M1903.
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  #16  
Old 01-08-2020, 03:34 PM
broomhandle broomhandle is offline
 
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Hi M.C.

Your considerable collecting insight is a big + for me to better understand this part of the hobby.

Have healthy & happy new year,
broom
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  #17  
Old 01-26-2020, 04:20 PM
jakhamr81 jakhamr81 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
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I have a Rock Island 1903, built in 1918 that has an RIA 6-18 barrel. The rifle was likely overhauled around WW2 because it has an Oneida Limited rear sight but I believe it to retain it's orginal barrel and stock. When I bought it I was searching for an 03 that was built during or prior to WW1 to fulfill my own desire to own the battle rifles of every American War prior to Vietnam.

In reality, this rifle likely never saw any real action. The ME is under 2, the rifling is beautiful, and I'm ringing steel at 300 with this rifle. Had it actually saw any action in the French trenches, jungles of South America, or even a fair amount on the range, the bore should have been worn out long ago given the corrosive ammunition of that time.

I also have a Remington 1917 that is a true mix master and was rebarreled with a 9-18 barrel. I speculate that this rifle was arsenal overhauled sometime after Armistice and it likely saw some service during WW1. Now that service may only have been training, but was still likely enough to wear out the original barrel.

My point is that if you have a truly correct-grade service rifle, it likely never saw any service. I'm perfectly happy owning mix masters, because that's simply a part of service rifles life.
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  #18  
Old 01-26-2020, 05:05 PM
austintexas austintexas is offline
 
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I correct some of my Garands, I don't plan on correcting any Gastraps. If it is a small part and wear patterns match I'll correct. I kinda keep track of the cost of parts I buy and usually I end up using the part I replaced on a different rifle. I used to peddle off extra parts but always ended up needing that part for another rifle. As for value, I remember parts kits, $150.00 for everything but a receiver. I paid $165.00 for my first DCM Garand, Bought lots of Woodless Garands and fixed them up. I have never lost a dime on a Garand, Corrected or not. Inflation almost guarantees you recoup your money.
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  #19  
Old 01-26-2020, 05:48 PM
nf1e nf1e is online now
 
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Just my opinion. If a rifle was not " correct" and papered when it came into your hands, it never can be.
It may have been " corrected" , but it will never be correct.
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  #20  
Old 01-26-2020, 06:23 PM
Orlando Orlando is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nf1e View Post
Just my opinion. If a rifle was not " correct" and papered when it came into your hands, it never can be.
It may have been " corrected" , but it will never be correct.
Very True
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