Go Back   CMP Forums > Welcome Center > How To's
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-23-2014, 06:45 PM
Brundle Brundle is offline
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Maryland
Posts: 32
Default Finishing a CMP stock using tung oil/tung oil finish

Hi guys,

I just got a CMP Garand. The stock was made by CMP in 2013 and is made of walnut. It does not look shiny, so I don't think it has any finish. I want to finish it so it looks authentic military.

I found this advice page, but am confused. http://www.thecmp.org/Sales/askarmor...ng_article.htm

Here is the source of my confusion:

Quote:
Tung Oil is also a natural product best described as a yellow or brownish oil extracted from the seeds of the tung tree. It is also called Chinawood oil. Tung oil does not dry well either and is only slightly better at moisture exclusion than linseed oil.
Boiled Linseed Oil (BLO) is a mixture of linseed oil, a carrier or solvent, and driers. It is superior to pure linseed oil in that it will more completely dry over time and is slightly more waterproof. BLO does not completely cure or dry and multiple coats dry even less well. Boiled Tung Oil (BTO) is a mixture of tung oil, a carrier or solvent, and driers. It is superior to pure linseed oil, pure tung oil, and boiled linseed oil in that it will more likely cure or dry over time and is slightly more waterproof. The BTO finish is slightly harder and more resistant to gun oils and chemicals associated with firearms. None of these four products is really good at excluding moisture from wood.

Minwax Tung Oil Finish is an oil and varnish blend that is much more waterproof and will dry due to added driers. It can be built up into a gloss, but that is not usually done. It is best used as an in the wood finish rather than a built up on the wood finish. Minwax Tung Oil Finish resists scratches and is more resistant to gun oils and chemicals associated with firearms.
The best qualities of Minwax Tung Oil Finish allow it to be wiped on and wiped off properly prepared wood leaving an in the wood finish of a look similar to BLO, but far more stable and protective. A number of coats to clean and repair scratches can be applied without building up on the surface if rubbed in carefully and then rubbed dry. Other finish products with similar sounding names may have far more varnish and behave differently in use. Some are varnishes thinned out enough with carriers and solvents so that they will penetrate into wood and not quickly build a hard film.
It sounds like Minwax Tung Oil Finish is the way to go since the end result is a rifle whose wood looks authentic, but actually has superior qualities (waterproof, doesn't get gooey when the gun is hot). I'd like to use Minwax Tung Oil Finish.

My stock is bare wood right now. Do I have to first apply Tung Oil, then wait for it to dry, and then apply Tung Oil FINISH? Or do I only need to apply Tung Oil FINISH? I don't understand.

Also, even though my gun is new, the stock is dirty and I want to clean it. When I first took it out of the box and held it, I noticed the palms of my hands were a bit blackened after holding the gun for several minutes. I couldn't figure out where the black stuff was coming from. After a couple handlings of the gun (hey, who could resist?), the parts of the wood near the trigger and the front underside where I gripped it had turned a dirty brown color. How do I clean that off so all of the wood looks clean and uniform before I then apply a uniform finish to everything?

Thanks. It should be clear that I know nothing of woodworking, stains, finishes, etc.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-23-2014, 08:43 PM
Fogtripper Fogtripper is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,505
Default

Just for the record, if a stock's finish is getting gooey in the hot sunshine, it was not applied properly. Or that old preservative grease is weeping. NOT because it was PTO or RLO.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-24-2014, 12:36 AM
Soonlobo Soonlobo is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 183
Default

I just finished a CMP stock that was also dry.

My suggestion would be to use boiled linseed oil or real tung oil, and you can use a combination of both.

The key is rubbing the oil in by hand, let the stock dry for 10 to 15 minutes, then use a clean lint-free rag to wipe off the excess oil. It takes 5-7 coats overall, each coat allowed to dry for 12-24 hours before the next coat is applied. It's best to start with the boiled linseed oil in my opinion. I gave the stock 5 coats of BLO followed by two finishing coats of real tung oil.

Before:



After:



The finish that results is a matte finish that shines just a bit in the sun. I plan on adding more coats as time goes on, the old rule is once a day for a week, once a week for a month, once a month per year, then once a year.

Last edited by Soonlobo; 05-24-2014 at 12:42 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-24-2014, 01:50 AM
erichp erichp is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 16
Default

The stock is not made by CMP. Its a Boyd's stock that came thru Dupage. Dupage uses a light coat of Minwax American Walnut stain on their supplied CMP stocks. So it will be dry, just just so you know it should be stained.

Do make sure to verify all clearances on the op rod and barrel. Many have some degree rub. Usually can be found via the tilt test or park wear on op rod.

Happy refinishing!!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-24-2014, 01:59 AM
Threeband Threeband is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 146
Default

Please do not use the "tung oil finish".

Use the real stuff. It's easy to work with. I thin it 50/50 with mineral spirits for the first couple coats.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-24-2014, 02:00 AM
Soonlobo Soonlobo is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 183
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Threeband View Post
Please do not use the "tung oil finish".

Use the real stuff. It's easy to work with. I thin it 50/50 with mineral spirits for the first couple coats.
That is very good advice!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-24-2014, 06:36 AM
mac1911 mac1911 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,438
Default

If your looking just to clean it. Warm water and dish soap. Give it a good wipe with a damp soapy rag. This should get and dirt off of a new stock. Then rinse with a damp clean rag.
The finish on the cmp new stocks is very thin and sands off easily. Careful though the primary reason for the stain/finish is to even out the color of the 3 pieces.
I have done 4 cmp stocks. Personally I had very little luck with BLO.
I also did not like the smell or feel of it. I applied per instructions and waited 10 days between coats. Your results may vary.
100% pure tung oil. Hoppes brand easy to work with and I really like how it looks. I have done some of my other old guns also.
Minwax tung oil finish. Also easy to work with. Can be applied so it does not get glossy. There is a difference in "shine " vs 100% TO.
It is easy to manipulate. I used it on the rifle I shoot the most.
For cmp new wood stocks apply anything you want. My advice is if you have zero wood working/ finish skills buy some scrap walnut somewhere and apply a few different finishes and coats.
I applied at least 5 and as many as 8 coats of tung oil to the new wood. Letting it dry no less than 7 days between coats.
I am not an expert but I do not recommend mixing different finishes or applying one over the other.
As noted in the article all three can be reapplied at any time to touch up and refresh asxlong as you don't wax it..clean it and reappply as needed.

You will also want to make sure your stock fits as best as it can and the handguards have proper relief. My rear upper hand guard was so tight I'm surprised it didnt crack. The lower band on the front of the stock was a poor fit. Had to remove and recontour the wood to lower it and relieve the op rod contact. Barrel channel was also very tight.

Last edited by mac1911; 05-24-2014 at 06:43 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-24-2014, 09:15 AM
Fogtripper Fogtripper is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,505
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by erichp View Post
The stock is not made by CMP. Its a Boyd's stock that came thru Dupage. Dupage uses a light coat of Minwax American Walnut stain on their supplied CMP stocks. So it will be dry, just just so you know it should be stained.
IMHO, birch? Stain the heck out of it. Walnut? No need for stain whatsoever.
Finishing a walnut is quite different than a birch.

Last edited by Fogtripper; 05-24-2014 at 09:18 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-24-2014, 10:11 AM
Duce Duce is online now
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Minnapolis, MN
Posts: 497
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brundle View Post
How do I clean that off so all of the wood looks clean and uniform before I then apply a uniform finish to everything?
Mineral spirits or acetone should do the trick.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brundle View Post
My stock is bare wood right now. Do I have to first apply Tung Oil, then wait for it to dry, and then apply Tung Oil FINISH? Or do I only need to apply Tung Oil FINISH? I don't understand.
I've finished stocks in both Pure Tung Oil ("PTO") and Tung Oil Finisher ("TOF"). I wouldn't mix/match them. Choose one and go with it. If you're looking for a waterproof finish, I believe the TOF will provide somewhat better protection while still giving it an "authentic" look, as long as you don't apply it too thick. It's been my experience that the PTO, after several coats and curing, provides a semi-durable finish that will not nick easily and protects against light water intrusion (meaning that it will hold up to a few minutes in the rain with no problems.... prolonged exposure to moisture, though, will probably lead to water intrusion).

There are a variety of finishes one can apply to their stock, as well as a variety of stains. The combinations are endless. Being that it is walnut and it sounds as if you haven't finished a lot of stocks before, the simplest stain I've found that gives adequate results is Minwax's Special Walnut stain. That and a few coats of TOF or PTO should give nice results. If you're feeling a bit more adventurous, you could try some of the alcohol-based stains. They seem to provide better results, but it does take some trial-and-error to learn, and you may have to spend some time removing it all if you don't like the look (don't ask me why I know this).

There are a lot of threads here that deal with stock refinishing. Here is a link to one project I did. While that was for a new CMP birch stock (Read: Boyds), that thread does provide some background and links on how to finish stocks in general.

Good luck.
__________________
I love the smell of Kroil in the evening.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-24-2014, 11:03 AM
Soonlobo Soonlobo is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 183
Default

Just to clarify, you can use both BLO and PTO in alternating coats with no problems whatsoever. I do not mix the oils in one coat.

My preference is to finish with tung oil as it provides a little more protection than the BLO and tends to turn more red over time.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
linseed oil, stock oil

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:14 PM.