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  #21  
Old 05-25-2014, 09:53 AM
Fogtripper Fogtripper is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kinglion4751 View Post
If you want to use only Minwax Tung Oil Finish , go ahead. But do not apply Pure Tung Oil after you have applied the Minwax Tung Oil - it will be a waste. To obtain good results , apply 5 to 7 coats of Pure Tung Oil - then finish off with Minwax Tung Oil Finish.
I do not understand why folks would suggest applying an oil finish that they are just going to cover over with a varnish.
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  #22  
Old 05-25-2014, 11:07 AM
Threeband Threeband is offline
 
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People make this sound a lot more complicated than it is.

It really is very, very simple.

It's your rifle; do what you want.

---But:---


I would not use the "Finish", which is actually a varnish. I use Pure Tung Oil that I got from the Real Milk Paint folks years ago. A small bottle lasts forever.


Just thin a little Tung Oil with about the same amount of mineral spirits.

Dribble a bit on the stock with your fingertips, then rub it in briskly. Just use your palm and the heel of your hand. Rub it all around. I like to rub hard enough to build some heat.

This takes no skill.

Don't over complicate it. Don't let people intimidate you with a lot of talk about "wood finishing skills."

This takes no skill or previous experience.

It is so simple a monkey could do it.



After you rub the thinned Tung Oil into the stock, you can rub off the excess with a paper towel. I tear up the paper towels in little bits and flush them, but I have "city" sewer. I don't want to worry about spontaneous combustion. Other people make a big fuss about "clean, lint free rags" (hand woven from pure Egyptian cotton?) It ain't complicated. Paper towels are lint free, cheap, and flushable if you don't have a septic tank.

Don't use so much that there's a lot of excess, though. Just dribble a bit on with your fingers and rub it in.

You can do a second coat 12 to 24 hours later, or whenever you get around to it. Remember, this is not complicated. Don't let anyone make it sound complicated.


After two or three coats, you might use the oil straight, uncut with mineral spirits. Or keep using the thinned stuff. It's not complicated.

After 4 or 5 or 6 coats over about a week or two, you can stop.

Rub a bit more in every once in a while.



The old formula is: "Once a day for a week. Once a week for a month. Once a month for a year. Once a year thereafter." Good formula, but don't let it intimidate you.





If that sounds more complicated than cleaning your windshield with some Windex and a squeegee, then read it again. It takes LESS skill than cleaning your windshield.

And as for all the old geezers who want to intimidate you with talk about "wood finishing skills" and "stock finishing experience", all you're doing is rubbing a little oil into a piece of wood.

It does not take a skilled automotive mechanic to clean your windshield.
It does not take a skilled wood finisher to rub oil into your gunstock.
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  #23  
Old 05-25-2014, 12:21 PM
Soonlobo Soonlobo is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fogtripper View Post
No, it doesn't.
Yes it does.

I've done it twice and it turns red over time.
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  #24  
Old 05-25-2014, 01:02 PM
Fogtripper Fogtripper is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soonlobo View Post
Yes it does.

I've done it twice and it turns red over time.
Linseed is known for it's dramatic color shift during oxidation and aging, and many choose tung to avoid that property. You posted that tung oil "tends to turn more red over time" than linseed. That is simply not true.

Last edited by Fogtripper; 05-25-2014 at 02:47 PM.
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  #25  
Old 05-25-2014, 03:34 PM
Soonlobo Soonlobo is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fogtripper View Post
Linseed is known for it's dramatic color shift during oxidation and aging, and many choose tung to avoid that property. You posted that tung oil "tends to turn more red over time" than linseed. That is simply not true.
BOILED linseed oil is not linseed oil.
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  #26  
Old 05-25-2014, 03:46 PM
Brundle Brundle is offline
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Maryland
Posts: 32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threeband View Post
People make this sound a lot more complicated than it is.

It really is very, very simple.

It's your rifle; do what you want.

---But:---


I would not use the "Finish", which is actually a varnish. I use Pure Tung Oil that I got from the Real Milk Paint folks years ago. A small bottle lasts forever.


Just thin a little Tung Oil with about the same amount of mineral spirits.

Dribble a bit on the stock with your fingertips, then rub it in briskly. Just use your palm and the heel of your hand. Rub it all around. I like to rub hard enough to build some heat.

This takes no skill.

Don't over complicate it. Don't let people intimidate you with a lot of talk about "wood finishing skills."

This takes no skill or previous experience.

It is so simple a monkey could do it.



After you rub the thinned Tung Oil into the stock, you can rub off the excess with a paper towel. I tear up the paper towels in little bits and flush them, but I have "city" sewer. I don't want to worry about spontaneous combustion. Other people make a big fuss about "clean, lint free rags" (hand woven from pure Egyptian cotton?) It ain't complicated. Paper towels are lint free, cheap, and flushable if you don't have a septic tank.

Don't use so much that there's a lot of excess, though. Just dribble a bit on with your fingers and rub it in.

You can do a second coat 12 to 24 hours later, or whenever you get around to it. Remember, this is not complicated. Don't let anyone make it sound complicated.


After two or three coats, you might use the oil straight, uncut with mineral spirits. Or keep using the thinned stuff. It's not complicated.

After 4 or 5 or 6 coats over about a week or two, you can stop.

Rub a bit more in every once in a while.



The old formula is: "Once a day for a week. Once a week for a month. Once a month for a year. Once a year thereafter." Good formula, but don't let it intimidate you.





If that sounds more complicated than cleaning your windshield with some Windex and a squeegee, then read it again. It takes LESS skill than cleaning your windshield.

And as for all the old geezers who want to intimidate you with talk about "wood finishing skills" and "stock finishing experience", all you're doing is rubbing a little oil into a piece of wood.

It does not take a skilled automotive mechanic to clean your windshield.
It does not take a skilled wood finisher to rub oil into your gunstock.
YOU get it.

YOU need to be empowered with the authority to identify and ban people from this forum forever if they act bad.
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  #27  
Old 05-25-2014, 07:12 PM
Fogtripper Fogtripper is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soonlobo View Post
BOILED linseed oil is not linseed oil.
Boiled linseed oil is linseed oil with dryers added.
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  #28  
Old 05-25-2014, 07:15 PM
Soonlobo Soonlobo is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 183
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fogtripper View Post
Boiled linseed oil is linseed oil with dryers added.
Hence it is NOT linseed oil.
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  #29  
Old 05-25-2014, 08:09 PM
wpage wpage is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Jersey Shore
Posts: 256
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Tung oil does leave a nice finish...
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  #30  
Old 05-25-2014, 08:24 PM
Threeband Threeband is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 146
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mac1911 View Post
You must have a old 22 that is in need of a fresh look....practice on that.
...
You don't need to practice anything.

It is so damn simple you can not mess it up.

Do you have to "practice" buttering a slice of toast?

Spill some orange juice on the kitchen counter. Do you have to "practice" cleaning it up with a paper towel?

All you're doing is rubbing a little oil into a piece of wood. Just a little bit, dribbled on with your fingers. There simply is nothing to mess up.

Whereas, I can never quite get all the streaks when I clean my windshield. Now THAT takes skill.
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