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  #11  
Old 11-24-2021, 12:27 AM
lapriester lapriester is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Cobb, N California
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$1050 is too high. Maybe for a nice Winchester but not a mixmaster, rebuilt, well used Eddystone like you pictured and described. $650-$750 tops. It probably started it's life as a CMP Field Grade Eddystone.

Last edited by lapriester; 11-24-2021 at 12:31 AM.
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  #12  
Old 11-24-2021, 05:53 PM
John Beard John Beard is online now
 
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Location: Sweet Home Alabama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cplnorton View Post
Check Headspace. Thousands if not into the tens of thousands were released by the old DCM right after WWII that would not headspace and needed to be rebarreled. They were sold as Drill or blank firing rifles.

So definitely check headspace on every M1917.
The reason the rifles wouldn't headspace is because the untrained ordnance monkeys didn't know how to properly check headspace on an M1917 rifle. M1917 headspace is checked using a special procedure. I had to train CMP armorers how to check M1917 headspace.

J.B.
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  #13  
Old 11-24-2021, 06:11 PM
Calfed Calfed is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Beard View Post
The reason the rifles wouldn't headspace is because the untrained ordnance monkeys didn't know how to properly check headspace on an M1917 rifle. M1917 headspace is checked using a special procedure. I had to train CMP armorers how to check M1917 headspace.

J.B.
John, in your experience, have most 1917's headspaced when you used the proper technique?
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  #14  
Old 11-24-2021, 06:55 PM
John Beard John Beard is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calfed View Post
John, in your experience, have most 1917's headspaced when you used the proper technique?
Yes!!!!!

J.B.
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  #15  
Old 11-24-2021, 09:51 PM
Whitpusmc Whitpusmc is offline
 
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I would love to know that procedure sir!

Thanks

Whit
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  #16  
Old 11-24-2021, 10:11 PM
John Beard John Beard is online now
 
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The procedure is simple. Unlike the M1903 action, the M1917 internal receiver ring locking lug shoulders are cammed. The bolt doesn't lock into battery until the last few degrees of handle rotation at the very bottom. So you have to turn the handle all the way down and check for very slight resistance at the very bottom of the rotation. And unless you're installing a new barrel, headspace should be checked with a FIELD gauge.

I will point out that this camming action will allow the M1917 rifle to chamber a round with a fouled chamber. This virtue could be a life saver in hot combat.

J.B.

p.s.,

This description and procedure is published in WWI period manuals. I didn't make it up. I gave published copies of the procedure to the armorers at the CMP.

Last edited by John Beard; 11-24-2021 at 10:19 PM.
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  #17  
Old 11-25-2021, 05:12 PM
jabbo jabbo is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Beard View Post
The procedure is simple. Unlike the M1903 action, the M1917 internal receiver ring locking lug shoulders are cammed. The bolt doesn't lock into battery until the last few degrees of handle rotation at the very bottom. So you have to turn the handle all the way down and check for very slight resistance at the very bottom of the rotation. And unless you're installing a new barrel, headspace should be checked with a FIELD gauge.

I will point out that this camming action will allow the M1917 rifle to chamber a round with a fouled chamber. This virtue could be a life saver in hot combat.

J.B.

p.s.,

This description and procedure is published in WWI period manuals. I didn't make it up. I gave published copies of the procedure to the armorers at the CMP.
I found this out checking the headspace of my newly acquired M1917…using a field gauge with the bolt stripped I was initially horrified when the bolt appeared to close…then I saw that the bolt handle wasn’t all the way down. That made me happy pretty quick, though I worried a bit that it seemed so close to being out of spec - your explanation has eliminated the worry!
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