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  #11  
Old 07-03-2020, 07:08 AM
milprileb milprileb is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Saigon, RVN
Posts: 2,744
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WindLogik View Post
I really like Redding powder measures. You can get used No. 3s for a good price and replace any parts needed (easy to buy at Midway). I have had the best statistics from the Reddings. I owned and used a Harrell's for a few years, and it did not perform any better than my Reddings. It was not as nice to use, so I sold it.

Regarding weigh vs. throw, it really depends upon what you're doing. If you are shooting field positions in mid-range or across the course matches OR you are looking for general purpose shorter-range ammo in rifles of typical quality, a powder measure really saves a lot of time. I weigh charges on a lab scale for my very high-end rifles or if I am shooting from 600 yards and farther.
Lot of wisdom earned by experience in the above post. I'd like to add what is the objective of your powder measure. If its to reload ammo (as said above) for short to mid range accuracy to shoot scores on large bullseyes, the measure is the way to go. Now if you want precision accuracy..shot groups on a sustained basis that are tight, then you got to drop powder and measure to ensure powder charges are exact. That is not a score , its chasing maximum accuracy.

Only the shooter can define what kind of accuracy he is after. Shoot for scores ? Hit gallon milk jugs 100 to 1000 yds?, shoot man size silhouette targets as various ranges (all hits on target count) , break skeet birds at any distance ? Chase small shot groups ?

Reloading in my view is achieving down range the performance you want. That is success.

Frankly I get tired of chasing small shot groups and want some fun. Hitting skeet birds , milk jugs is often the objective of some shooting days and my hand loading is done to achieve that.
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  #12  
Old 07-03-2020, 07:40 AM
milprileb milprileb is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Saigon, RVN
Posts: 2,744
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WindLogik View Post
I really like Redding powder measures. You can get used No. 3s for a good price and replace any parts needed (easy to buy at Midway). I have had the best statistics from the Reddings. I owned and used a Harrell's for a few years, and it did not perform any better than my Reddings. It was not as nice to use, so I sold it.

Regarding weigh vs. throw, it really depends upon what you're doing. If you are shooting field positions in mid-range or across the course matches OR you are looking for general purpose shorter-range ammo in rifles of typical quality, a powder measure really saves a lot of time. I weigh charges on a lab scale for my very high-end rifles or if I am shooting from 600 yards and farther.
Lot of wisdom earned by experience in the above post. I'd like to add what is the objective of your powder measure. If its to reload ammo (as said above) for short to mid range accuracy to shoot scores on large bullseyes, the measure is the way to go. Now if you want precision accuracy..shot groups on a sustained basis that are tight, then you got to drop powder and measure to ensure powder charges are exact. That is not a score , its chasing maximum accuracy.

Only the shooter can define what kind of accuracy he is after. Shoot for scores ? Hit gallon milk jugs 100 to 1000 yds?, shoot man size silhouette targets as various ranges (all hits on target count) , break skeet birds at any distance ? Chase small shot groups ?

Reloading in my view is achieving down range the performance you want. That is success.

Frankly I get tired of chasing small shot groups and want some fun. Hitting skeet birds , milk jugs is often the objective of some shooting days and my hand loading is done to achieve that.
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  #13  
Old 07-03-2020, 07:57 AM
navyrifleman navyrifleman is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 733
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Great posts regarding powder measures. I learned the basics of reloading from my Dad back in the 1960's. And they truly were "basics".

We did not have a lot of money to spend on the fancier "state-of-the-art" gadgets, so what we used was a Herter's powder scale and a spoon for measuring out powder into the pan. Kind of like sprinkling sugar on your corn flakes.

Today, I have a digital powder scale and a powder measure, but from force of habit, I still weigh most - if not all - of my powder charges even when they come from the powder measure.
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