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  #41  
Old 12-31-2017, 02:14 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: AL
Posts: 3,167
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Here are some more pics.
Looks like I lucked out with my IMA Brunswick. Stock is solid, I found a split stock tip under the brass, one chip came out and another small split. All repaired, no issues. Wormholes in bottom of buttstock, minor. Thinking of a solution, no hurry.
Disassembly was no issue, just patience and slow, add force gradually. Most pins are rusted, I will wait until reassembly to decide what to do (reuse, replace, will stock holes need addressing?). Nipple came out easily (pure luck, and patience with Kroil) and looks perfect. Small parts have been in ultrasonic, I did a quick clean of barrel (diluted purple power and scrub), forgot the pics, it is fine.





I forgot to mention: Turns out my rifle was actually owned by the 3-time winner of the "All Nepal Rifle Team" annual competition. There was paperwork documenting it but I lost it






Here is the sword bayonet after a quick cleaning. I let it soak in diluted purple power for 15 min and scrubbed with a scotchbrite sponge. Handle will need some detailed work but this looks great.



JH

Last edited by ZvenoMan; 12-31-2017 at 03:55 PM.
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  #42  
Old 12-31-2017, 02:37 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
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What does this have to do with CMP? Well, it's a milsurp, and the techniques are universal. Some leave these as-is, some do light cleaning just enough to "function", some do complete detail cleaning (that is me), some refinish much more than me. These can be made to look "as new" by more wood repair, more aggressive metal work and addressing the wood and metal finish. Mine is a middle of the road approach, I know others may choose a different path. The google will show some pictures of all of these, I enjoy looking at them all and borrowing bits and pieces of their process.
Here is a great refernce thread, by someone with much more woodworking and machining skill than I; https://www.milsurps.com/showthread.php?t=23840
Here is what I have done:
All metal pieces were removed and dropped into ultrasonic. I use a purple power and water, I started at 50/50 and added more PP.
Here are the brass parts. The trigger guard and escutcheons are as-removed from the US. I scrubbed the ramrod pipes and buttplate with copper wool.







I have seen restoratioins where the brass was smoothed and polished, these are solid and can be made to look new. I will leave some patina but make them look maintained. New looking brass on beat up wood doesn't work for me, and I have no desire to remove the dents and dings in the wood. Plenty of photos on the Google to make your own decision. Note the rough casting inside the buttplate.

Here are some of the metal parts.
You can see the lock cleaned up great. The sling swivels have some rust pitting as do most screws through the wood, all look quite serviceable. If you look in the ultrasonic you can see the barrel tang; compare it to the before picture in the post above.



JH
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  #43  
Old 12-31-2017, 03:02 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: AL
Posts: 3,167
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Time for some wood pictures.
1st I sprayed diluted purple power on the wood, let sit for 20 min and scrubbed with a wet scotchbrite sponge. It got the rust-dirt looking crud off leaving black nasty wood.



I should have taken more pictures. The brown streaks are the original crud. It took 3 sessions of spray-pray-wait-scrub. This is after the 2nd, you can see some of the final black wood.

Some stop here; having seen some pictures of the actual wood I decided to remove the 150 yrs of aging. Some may choose not to do this. After some research I decided I would do this. I used oven cleaner (easiest way to apply lye soap). If you plan to do this I suggest testing on an obscure part of the stock to see if it meets your needs. this is my 1st time doing this, and I am very pleased.
I spray on the cleaner and let it sit for 20 min. Then I scrub with an old toothbrush to ensure I loosen everything, especially in the recesses, cutouts and ramrod channel. I then immediately wipe dry (paper towels, and once wiped clean, some wet ones will remove more crud). 2-3 sessions of this are needed. You can do one after the other, but you need it to dry (30-60 min for me) so you can fully see what is now wood and what is still crud.
I started at the front and have worked my way back to the lock area. You can easily see how this progresses.

No cleaning from lock to 1st escutcheon (other than what ran down the stock). To the right is one session of cleaner, scrub, wipe.


2 sessions towards the right. It looks more orange in the picture, it is actually a very nice chocolate shade with nice visible grain.


3 sessions towards the right. It is still drying, and there is still moisture in the dings and marks so they look darker. It has evened out well. You can see the one stock split where the left pin holding the ramrod pipe has rusted to the wood. What looks like a crack running through the hash marks is just a scratch best I can tell but will keep any eye on it.


One note: Once the final wipe of cleaner is done use some pipe cleaners, patches, wadded up paper towels and hit all the recesses. Pull through screw holes, get all of the crud out of the recesses. As it's drying it's easy to see as it's not dry yet.

JH
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  #44  
Old 12-31-2017, 03:20 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
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Location: AL
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Repairs.
1st was a split at the tip. This is common as the wood was poorly finished at the very end under the brass cap (rough edges will promote cracks) and of course the crew adds stress.
1st I ensure I cleaned well before. Then use a solvent to get it cleaner, and degrease. Here I pried it open with a popsicle stick and brushed MEK in it, and pulled a patch through it. This drys immediately and you are ready to go. I mixed some epoxy, I suggest 30 min or longer, the 5 min sometimes isn't enough. Also the longer it remains fluid the more it penetrates into the wood, making for a stronger repair. There are many glues that work, plenty of threads on this. My go-to is epoxy; acraglass is an epoxy of course.
Slop the glue into the crack coating everything (a toothpick is perfect). I used spring clamps, they could have been tighter but it would have bent the channel, so I wound up with a slight gap. Had this been in a more visible and more stressed spot I would have built a more elaborate clamping fixture. Once clamped use a wet paper towel to wipe up the epoxy that oozed out. Once dry a few swipes with sandpaper will remove the shiny glue residue.
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Notice the nice chocolate color under all the grime.
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Repair set, a few swipes of the sandpaper and it's done.
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My clamp closed the crack on the outside but there is a hairline inside. I should have clamped around a dowell or socket and used a dozen clamps. I'll pour some epoxy in and call it done. The screw hole will need to be chased and I will gently dress the end before replacing the brass.

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JH
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  #45  
Old 12-31-2017, 03:50 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
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More repair:
I had a small chip come out when I was removing an escutcheon and there was a split from one of the ramrod pipe pins.

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I cleaned with MEK and a patch again, prying open the split with a small screwdriver.
I mixed some epoxy and used a toothpick to get in all the cracks, coating generously. This time I tested the clamping before beginning. Once clamped I used a wet paper towel to wipe up the excess epoxy.

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I think this wood will look impressive once oiled and cured.
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I found one more crack. I couldn't get it to close up using moderate pressure, nor could I get it to open. I cleaned as best I could with MEK then when dry I filled with CYA. I rarely use CYA on wood (many swear by it; to me it's too brittle) but for this I'm sure it will be fine.


FYI:
CYA is cyanoacrylate. I use "regular"; no need for extra thin or extra thick for this use. Just buy it at walmart, wherever.
MEK is Methyl Ethyl Ketone; don't breath it or get it near any plastic. It was handy, there are many other cleaners or solvents you could use.

Regarding glues: There are as many threads on glues as there are opinions on how to "fairly" sell CMP 1911s.
Most will work fine, just research and pick one or two (no one glue is perfect for all repairs); the key is don't use one that is inappropriate.
Inappropriate could be:
  • Assuming all glues are the same.
  • Using any glue without clamping. Immovable repairs will move while curing; ask Murphy. I placed a screw clamp on the buttstock crack in case the CYA expanded (I don't think it can, but I have no shortage of clamps)
  • CYA on a high stress, high shock area (like gluing a stock broken in half at the wrist).
  • Using a PVA (Polyvinyl acetate) in an area that will become wet.
  • Using an expanding glue like gorilla glue without spending a great deal of time determining how to clamp the parts so they do not move while curing.
  • Using epoxy on a large repair without considering where it may run (hint: You can make a dam with modelling clay and masking tape to contain it).

JH
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  #46  
Old 01-07-2018, 02:46 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
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Next update:

I have a few more spots on the stock.

I found a small crack here after the wood had dried so I worked in some epoxy. Interesting scratches.


Wood chip glued back in. Looks like there will be some gaps around it; I will know after sanding this repair.
I will not be sanding anywhere but the repairs; while some may choose to steam out dents and rework the stock, I will just make repairs to stabilize it, address any other issues (burrs/splinters, worm holes) and leave it as-is.


This is the bayonet lug cutout. I didn't notice earlier but there was a crack in the corner. When cutting material (wood, metal, paper), anytime there is a sharp angle that becomes a stress point. Always radius angles when possible if designing a new item!
Anyway, I held the crack open with a toothpick, cleaned with MEK then worked in some epoxy. I work some more in after the toothpick is out, more on the inside. I'll sand it down later. It is invisible from the outside now.


This will be entertaining. The original patch covers are broken so IMA supplies a "replacement". They do not fit:






The repro is close enough on the length of the lid. It is too narrow, and the radius of the fixed portion is entirely too long, and the screw hole is out of whack as a result.
Options:
1. Hammer it into the wood. Bondo to fill any gaps, and duct tape to hold the door closed.
2. Make the repro cover fit stock. This will require welding material to make it wider, plus welding to fill the screw hole. Then file to shape. This is outside my ability.
3. Make opening in the stock fit the fixed portion by removing wood. Then I must add a shim to the stock to narrow the opening, and blend it in. Not a fan but this may be the best option.
4. If I re-contour the fixed portion, shortening it to fit the opening that will work, except the screw hole is in that radius, so it will have to be filled (welded) and a new one drilled. Perhaps I can find someone to weld this for me. I will still have to add a shim to the stock to narrow the opening (or leave it off and accept that 1/4" gap).
Once done, will the sliding pin align with the existing hole in the buttplate? If not, re drill hole and leave (or weld) the old hole?

I knew of this challenge before I bought this; by no means am I complaining. Why does the repro not fit? I have no idea where IMA got these, perhaps they had one made that fit "most" of the rifles they have needing one? Who knows
I am in no hurry.

JH
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  #47  
Old 01-07-2018, 03:23 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
Join Date: May 2011
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Next will be to sand the repairs (gently, and while using masking tape to protect adjacent areas). No power tools.
The worm holes (underside of buttstock) are few and minor. I could ignore them, I could fill with epoxy and sawdust. I saw a thread discussing a period-correct method of beeswax and something (sawdust?) to fill the wormholes, I will stick with nothing or glue and sawdust.

Most likely once sanded, I will apply some oil and prepare for reassembly and leave the patch cover for a while while I consider my options.

I found this thread before I placed my order.
https://www.milsurps.com/showthread.php?t=23840
The 1837 is identical to the 1841 except the barrel has a unique 2-groove rifling for a belted ball projectile, and IMA includes a Brass handled bayonet instead of my steel one.
Note how he addresses the patch cover. I have compared; my repro cover is cut differently from his, it has a much longer fixed portion. I may ask IMA if they have any others.

I will probably buy one of the untouched "broken stock" Brunswicks from IMA. I will then have plenty of wood for adding a splice, as well as to use for crack filling sawdust.

No pics today, but the metal parts are coming along well. I have identified a few issues:
1. The part that the hammer attaches to may be broken. It appears someone tried to pull the hammer back (or push it forward) while it was somehow frozen, torquing and twisting the shaft. I haven't been able to find a photo of the part so I'll reassemble the lock and see if it functions. If not, the broken Brunswick will have a lock, and a sticky note to IMA will ensure it is a complete lock. I suppose I could contact them to see if they have a supply of parts.
2. The screws holding in the stock escutcheons are tiny and rusted. I have soaked in muriatic acid to address the rust, I think 1 or 2 may be too short to reuse. But as I plan to do some work on both the screw holes as well as filling in the areas around the escutcheons I may be OK. When I begin to reassemble I will check the screw holes and address. They don't look bad enough to drill them and insert dowels but that may be needed. I may be able to clean them out and glue in a toothpick to make them strong enough? When refitting the escutcheons I may use the "shellac with sawdust" method to secure and blend them in; that may also help with the screws. The benefit is I will try the least invasive (and easiest) methods; if they don't work, on to the drill and dowel. Shellac and sawdust is easily removed with no trace remaining.

The pins are all rusted, and many are bent. I will buy some brass rod to use as replacements, but I may also use a properly sized nail or two (essentially what the original is). The brass will be easier to shape, and won't rust (not that I think it will ever be placed in a rust-prone environment in it's non-front line service future).

This project is coming along well. What I received is in as good or better shape than the M-H I last received, and of course, better than IMA describes. The wood itself looks excellent. My metal doesn't look as nice as in the above referenced thread, but I have not started on the barrel yet.

Awaiting another IMA sale so I may order the parts gun, and probably a Snider-Enfield to try next.

JH
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  #48  
Old 01-21-2018, 12:56 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
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Posts: 3,167
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Still awaiting an IMA sale; looks like they did a New Years price hike
Meanwhile all stock cracks are filled and cured. I sanded gently, easy as you sand until the shine of the glue is gone.
I lightly sanded the stock with 400 grit wet and dry just to smooth it back to a level surface (the cleaning process raised the grain). I did not sand hard enough to remove any of the markings or even scratches, just smooth to the touch.
Then 1 wet coat of Fairtrimmers, applied with a green scotchbrite. After 45 minutes I wiped the stock down until it was dry to the touch then left town for a week.
Today I applied 1 coat of BLO cut with Turpentine, very wet coat. Wiped down after 45 minutes and below is the result.





Pics are in full sun; the color contrast is not as strong in person. This wood really darkens with oil; compare it to my Nepal Martini Henry a few posts up, very similar.

While this stock will get several more coats of oil this is enough for me to begin assembling the bits and peices back on the stock.
HD/Lowes/Hobby Lobby were all bare on brass rod of the sizes I needed so I have some being shipped; bought an assortment of sizes that should last me a hundred rifles.
When I get the parts rifle I will use the broken 1/2 stock to fill the worm holes. I'll use a file to make some sawdust, mix with epoxy and fill the holes. I have seen some do the same by packing sawdust in the hole then putting cyanoacrylate (super glue) on it to seal. I am sure that will work the same, I may try one hole that way.
Meanwhile I'll start work on the barrel and ramrod; they need a full cleaning. The breech plug has been soaking with Kroil 2 weeks or so; maybe I will be able to remove if.
JH
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  #49  
Old 04-03-2018, 03:21 PM
Polock Polock is offline
 
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Great info---food for thought as I ponder how to clean some filthy milsurps!
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  #50  
Old 04-15-2018, 01:19 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
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Location: AL
Posts: 3,167
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Hey look, a squirrel.......
I have been sidetracked. I got a really nice rack grade (nice in my definition) IHC M1 from the south store, and then scored a $150 drill 1903A3 with very minor welds. The stock is cracked but possibly fixable.
Here's the M1 as received:







The stock is what lured me; finding that it was a RG helped.
Stock was cracked, more of a sliver, seen in the 3rd pic above just under the clip latch.
The 2nd pic shows some paint or scuffs, and the horizontal marks seen on some of the Turkey returns. No definitive cause, possibly rub marks form sling keepers, but maybe rub marks form some shipping device> Mine are dark buy very little actual surface damage; others are >1/8" deep.

No pics of the repair, I pried it open with a small pic, worked some epoxy in and clamped it closed. Wipe off epoxy that squeezed out with a wet rag and smooth with a green scotchbrite when dry.

Once the rest of the rifle was disassembled (parts went into the ultrasonic) I worked on the wood. For this I decided a minimalist approach, I can always strip and try something else.
I used my 50/50 mix of BLO and Turpentine and a green scotchbrite and scrubbed it clean. Just be careful near edges/corners and cartouches. You can feel the grit coming off when you do this. Once scrubbed (do not be sparing with the 50/50), wipe with a paper towel (don't waste a good rag!). 2-3 scrubs should do it. I worked on the rub marks as well.
Once dry-ish I used the scotchbrite with full strength BLO and wiped dry after 45 min. The I rubbed in another coat of BLO, wiped after 45 and buffed an hour later. Below is that.

[







Here is the trigger group fresh out of the ultrasonic; I chucked it in fully assembled.
I stripped it completely to ID and oil, it was completely clean. Impressive.



Below is 1st clip at TMP after reassembly. Centered rear sight and 8 slicks up from bottom.


Not bad for a worn out rack grade. I had to replace the buttplate (hinge broken) and lower band (odd, pin hole cut by torch, maybe off a drill rifle?).

The stock needs more oil, I may wax it (Tom's 1/3). While I could have completely stripped it (purple power/water/scrubbing); and can do so anytime, I like the look as-is. It's a solid stock with a little character and looks great.
JH
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