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  #11  
Old 02-03-2010, 10:49 PM
AJ100 AJ100 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Park, PA, 15129
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Thanks guys, my dad would have gotten a kick out reading this stuff about his rifle. Damn, 22 years since he passed away. Doesn't seem that long ago.

Check this out. This is the guy that carried that Carbine. He was 23 and at Camp Shelby Mississippi with the 806th TD, waiting to go in 1943.



Thanks, AJ(Tom Vogt)
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  #12  
Old 02-04-2010, 10:18 AM
hink441 hink441 is offline
 
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Location: Virginia
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AJ, nice picture of your Dad. Time has a habit of passing us up. Before you know it, your kids have kids and so on! Thats a nice shoulder rig your Dad is wearing in the picture. That 1911 would be nice to have also. Thanks again for sharing.
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  #13  
Old 02-04-2010, 10:52 AM
Fannypacker Fannypacker is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: North Texas
Posts: 12
Default What a great story

I am a bit older and could walk anywhere with my guns. When the war ended there were so many guys discharged that many got out with their bring back guns. A friend had a bring back 1911 he let me shoot as a kid.
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  #14  
Old 02-04-2010, 02:37 PM
shooter360 shooter360 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 67
Smile

I remember taking my Dad's parachute knife to "show and tell" in about 6th grade. He was a U.S.Navy pilot during WWII. I'm not sure of the date of the knife. It looked too nice to have been carried by him for a long period of time or during WWII. He never told me he had to use it to cut the shrouds of a parachute. Quite possibly it was a 50's or 60's issue item because he stayed in until he retired in the 60's.

The 3 1/2 inch(closed) knife had day-glo plastic orange side plates, a button that caused only the knife blade to deploy (switchblade) with two blades: one hooked blade for cutting shrouds and one normal blade, both very sharp and mirror finished. There was a u-shaped ring on one end like a Boy Scout knife to hook it to your flight suit.

Kept the knife in my pocket until time to show it in class. No hoo-haa, no freakout, no problem of any kind. Of course this was a public elementary school in Norfolk about 10 minutes from Gate 4 of the Naval Air Station.

At the time my dad was a LCDR stationed at NAS (I believe he was XO but my memory may be remembering a tour in England in the early 60's at a former RAF base at West Malling, Kent, about 5 miles from Maidstone) and we lived in housing just across the street from the Breezy Point O Club. Our housing was also across a field from the BOQ that had the best french fries ever in the snack bar. And the absolute best dumpster diving for Playboy and other nudie magazines on the planet and soft drink bottles for deposits(those junior officers, you know).

Man, what a place to be 12 or 13 and free to travel almost anyplace on that huge naval base on our bikes. Some of the kids I knew there later chose the military for a career including one a couple years younger than me who made Admiral. I was a pretty good kid and the SP's only had to bring me home a couple of times for being somplace I shouldn't have been. SP to my Dad: " I'm sorry Commander but he was found: in the left seat of an aircraft on display or in a hangar or at the end of the runway watching REAL CLOSE as aircraft began their takeoffs."

Sometimes thse Forum pages bring back amazing memories. Both my parents are deceased and, while I think of them often, I don't think about my childhood as often. It was a great childhood, moving around to various places around the world as a kid, not having the pressure my Dad and Mom had on them to make sure my brother and I were growing up OK. We were just supposed to have fun and be good.

Thanks gentlemen, I need to sign off before I go back even further to when my family was in Rome after the War where my Dad was Naval Attache.

I'm sorry, I just can't help remembering all the good times we had.

Happy Days!
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  #15  
Old 02-04-2010, 03:10 PM
TactTm1 TactTm1 is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 287
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AJ (and all):

The photo of your Dad at Camp Shelby makes me think of 2 things. 1) How many of our fathers made sacrifices and understood the need to keep our nation free and 2) the fact that Camp Shelby is still a staging area for our troops. AJ, can't you just picture your dad reaching in and flipping on a light in that barracks?? Just 3 days ago, i got a letter from my friend who is a Big Cheese and making his stop at the Camp. He is making it a practice to send out a monthly update, so i thought I'd post this one here, just because of its tie in to Camp Shelby...plus it is interesting how many changes have taken place in battlefield tools and tactics. Hope this isn't considered a hijack the thread.

Friends of “New Orleans Own” Washington Artillery,
On January 8, 2010, the Washington Artillery mobilized for one year of active duty service in support of our nation’s global war on terrorism. We reported to our new readiness center on the recently renovated and re-opened Jackson Barracks and were transported via charter buses to Camp Shelby, Mississippi. The first three days were spent moving in and establishing Command Posts (CPs), organizing Soldiers in their barracks. This is not an easy task. Gone are the days when you simply open a building, flip on the light switch, hang a map and telephone your higher headquarters and let them know that you are operational. We had to array two different satellite dishes to establish uplinks that enable digital communications for a local area network (LAN) called the Command Post of the Future (CPOF). We had to do the same thing on a similar system for tracking logistics. We also had to establish multiple tactical radio systems that are essentially encrypted. We also established a third radio up-link with a satellite as a redundant method of communication. The map on the wall has been replaced by operational graphics that are displayed on multiple tracking real-time events. Literally, as an event occurs, it populates or appears on our graphics. We all wear headsets with micro-phones so that we can cross-talk across the LAN. You can imagine all of the jokes going around with staff members wearing headsets imitating Vince, the “SHAM-WOW” salesman. Our telephones have all been replaced by voice-over internet protocol phones (VOIP). The only thing that remains the same from the CPs of the past at is the light switch.
We began our tactical training with a focus on battle drills and battle field visualization. In other words, battle drills are the specific actions that are based on events. When you receive small arms fire you do this; if you sustain a casualty you do this; if you hit an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) you do this. It may sound simple but it is not. All of this battle drills are coordinated among every member of your vehicle platform; typically a HMMWV or MRAP. Your vehicles actions are synchronized among the squad who is synchronized among the platoon, etc. We continually rehearse these battle drills until they become a function of muscle memory or a reflexive action like breathing. We have also been focusing on battlefield situational awareness and having a common operating picture among the battalion and adjacent forces. One of the tools that we use is Blue Force Tracker (BFT). It is like a civilian GPS however it shows what everyone is doing, not just you.
Much of our time has been spent on individual weapons qualification (IWQ) and crew-served weapons (CSW) qualification. Special emphasis has been placed on training with our weapon optics and night vision scopes (thermals). Some weapon systems have fixed mounts while others are worn by the Soldier on their helmet. We were also issued Improved Outer Tactical Vests (IOTV) or body armor along with knee and elbow pads, ammo pouches first aid kits etc. Each Soldier fights with about 50 pounds of equipment by the time we load out with our basic load of ammo. It takes a little getting used to but it is not that bad.
Living conditions at Camp Shelby have been adequate. The Soldiers are sleeping in 40 men open barracks while the NCOs and officers sleep in either 2 or 4 man rooms. The higher your rank, the fewer bunk-mates. The food is prepared and served by a local catering company. The food is actually very good and in large quantities. The best part is that there is no cooking or clean-up requirement for Soldiers. Our focus is solely on the fight. Morale is extremely high and only getting better as we anticipate the Saints victory in the Super Bowl. We have ensured that our training will cease at about 1500 hours so that we can all watch the game. We did the same thing for the NFC Championship game last week.
In closing I would like to give credit our successes at Camp Shelby to the overwhelming support that we have received from the home front. This support has been the foundation from which our high morale is sustained. It is an honor to serve our great nation and to be a part of this great group of Citizen Soldiers called “New Orleans Own” Washington Artillery.
Try Us!

1/141 Field Artillery
Commanding
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  #16  
Old 02-04-2010, 03:53 PM
AJ100 AJ100 is offline
 
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Location: South Park, PA, 15129
Posts: 200
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TacttM1, Hey, I started this thing so I say you can post anything you like.

When I worked in the mill for USS back in the 70's one of the "old timers" I was 18, was talking about his days in the service. Even then I listened real tight when one of these guys talked. He was telling me about his training in Mississippi. I asked him where and when. , Camp Shelby and in 1943 to boot. Heck, they could have been in the same chow line.

Another time I found some manuals at a gun show from the Army Air Corp. They were around $2.00 each so I bought a few.They looked like training books for the mechanics. All kind of illustrations and directions. Dated 1942 or 43. I took them to work one 4-12 shift and the operator I was helping wanted to know what I was reading. I showed him and he told me to get my butt in the chair and run the stand so he could take a look at them.

Turns out he was a Sgt./gunner on B17's. For work he even wore one of those caps with the brim turned up like you see the ground crews wearing in the movies.

There's this guy, 53 years old or so, sitting on a metal stool, with a Pall MAll hanging out of his mouth, drinking a cup of the roughest coffe you ever tasted, in a steel mill in Homestead PA. in 1973. And from the look on his face, he was back in England and it was 1943. Talk about memories! Man, that was really something to watch. I was watching him so closely I almost wrecked the slab I was rolling.

I gave him the book.

Now I wished I had asked more of those guys about their time in the service. My Dad never said much about his time overseas. Told me all about the training part but not much about later. None of them made a big deal about it. "Just doing my job" was the standard answer. Then they started to talk about their buddies. The ones that never came home. That's where I would start to choke up and make some lame excuse about having to leave.

AJ

Last edited by AJ100; 02-02-2011 at 08:22 AM.
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  #17  
Old 02-04-2010, 04:12 PM
MajRebuild MajRebuild is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Illinois
Posts: 57
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I am 63. Back around 1957 my dad's friend gave me a Mauser 98 from a crate of rifles that he bought. I was 10. That Mauser was fully functional. When we would all go to the park to play "Army" everyone had a toy gun except me. I lugged that Mauser around the neighborhood. Even had a German bayonet that my dad brought back. No one got excited or upset. No police were called. No news reports of a child with a weapon. My parents weren't arrested. I later traded the Mauser for a bike.
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  #18  
Old 02-04-2010, 04:48 PM
TactTm1 TactTm1 is offline
 
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Posts: 287
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It is not until we are older do we wish that the time and effort had been made to ask and listen more.

Have you ever asked your mother how she makes that special dish you look forward to every Christmas or Hanukkah? I mean really asked her, and watch as she makes it, writing down the exact measurements, etc? If not, one day you will wish you did.

I have my dad;s other war souveniers, but never really got the 'stories' behind the T-shirt with each island stenciled on it, the relics from Hiroshima, the Japanese helmet, rifle and bayonet, etc. Too late now.

Ever kick yourself in the butt for those times when Dad tried to tell you something that seemed like it would have been boring, so you just just kept your attention on the TV and nodded your head whenever there was a pause in his words?

If so...

Here is Tact Team 1's assignment for the day:

Pick up the phone and call that person who you have neglected for awhile, tell them you miss them, cherish them and promise to keep them more involved in your life. Don't make a big production out of it, but your friend, child, in-law, parent, etc. will be touched in their heart!



Note: hope you all liked the memo from the 141 commander.
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  #19  
Old 02-04-2010, 07:09 PM
AJ100 AJ100 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Park, PA, 15129
Posts: 200
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Picture of when he first went in. Joined up Feb. 1942, three months shy of his 22nd. birthday. Enlisted Dec. 1941, these first pics were from Feb. 42.



I put that one up here for the guys over on the "Bolt Action" side. Looks like a 1917 to me.

AJ

Last edited by AJ100; 02-05-2010 at 09:48 AM.
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  #20  
Old 02-04-2010, 07:14 PM
AJ100 AJ100 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Park, PA, 15129
Posts: 200
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I can only post so many at a time.

That's him in the front passenger seat.





1st and 2nd Squads, For the guys on this Carbine side.




AJ

Last edited by AJ100; 02-04-2010 at 07:47 PM.
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