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  #11  
Old 06-18-2018, 09:53 AM
Ohio Don Ohio Don is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwenum View Post
+1 for ‘rickgman’; what the heck do you need +P for anyway. You already have .45” of heavy lead coming out.
+P is useful in 1911s with shorter barrels. That way the velocity that you lose from the shorter barrel is made up by the higher pressure to start. An inch of barrel length can make a big difference in a pistol.

And as to someone asking if the metal in a 100 year old pistol can get weaker. The answer is yes. Springs are a good example of the metal fatiguing. And it doesn't take a hundred years with them. It only requires the loads and cycles placed on them. Same with all metals.
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  #12  
Old 06-18-2018, 11:51 AM
N8232J N8232J is offline
 
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.45 Automatic is a versatile and accurate caliber.

I save the full power hardball stuff for modern production guns, and find myself shooting essentially none of it as I get older and wiser.

Backing off on the load even just a little bit in a 45 works wonders for shooting comfort.

This is an easy caliber to load for. Small parts are available for your CMP1911 should you be lucky enough to score one.

The guns are not delicate. It's a very robust piece of machinery.

That said, setting your spring/ammo combo up to minimize frame battering is simply common sense.

I hope I live long enough to wear out my 45's.
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  #13  
Old 06-23-2018, 05:20 PM
wvtrooper16 wvtrooper16 is offline
 
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Just an FYI for everyone. I found this info on the internet under U.S. Army Technical Manual 43-0001-27. I thought it was pretty interesting:

CARTRIDGE, CALIBER .45, BALL, M1911

Use: Submachine Gun, Caliber .45, M3A1; and
Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911A1.
The cartridge is intended for use against personnel.

Description: BALL Cartridge. The cartridge is identified by the plain bullet tip.

Tabulated Data:

DODAC - 1305-A475
UNO serial number - 0012
UNO proper shipping name - Cartridges for weapons, inert projectile
Weight - 331 gr
Length -1.275 in. (32.4 mm)
Tracer-NA
Primer -Percussion
Fuze-NA
Explosive: Type - NA
Weight- NA
Incendiary: Type - NA
Weight- NA
Propellant: Type -SR 7970
Weight - 5 gr

Performance:

Chamber pressure - 19,000 psi
Velocity - 885 ± 25 fps, 25.5 ft from muzzle

References:

SB 700-20 TM 9-1005-211-12 TM 9-1005-229-12 TM 9-1300-206
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  #14  
Old 06-23-2018, 06:28 PM
Antiqucycle Antiqucycle is offline
 
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I have six 45's ranging from a 1918 Colt, 43 Rem Rand a like new Norinco even a Llama slide on a FO frame.
they seem to like whatever I load.
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  #15  
Old 06-23-2018, 06:41 PM
rickgman rickgman is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohio Don View Post

And as to someone asking if the metal in a 100 year old pistol can get weaker. The answer is yes. Springs are a good example of the metal fatiguing. And it doesn't take a hundred years with them. It only requires the loads and cycles placed on them. Same with all metals.
Don, That is sort oversimplifying the subject. Basically, how many load cycles a component can experience before failure is dependent on the material & the stress levels it experiences. If the the Sn curve is not exceeded there will be no issues. The Sn curve of carbon steels flattens out around 1,000,000 to 10,000,000 cycles. If the stress is below the Sn curve at that number of cycles, it can theoretically last forever. The moral of the story is not to unnecessarily stress components if you want they to have a long life. Running high pressure cartridges is unnecessary in my opinion since there isn't all that much more terminal ballistic performance gained by running +P pressure levels. +P generally means a pressure spec that is 10% above the standard cartridge pressure spec. Most .45 ACP cartridges run at about 19,000 psi chamber pressure. The SAAMI max. spec is 21,000 psi. The SAAMI +P max. pressure level is 23,000 psi.
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  #16  
Old 06-25-2018, 01:30 AM
Ohio Don Ohio Don is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickgman View Post
Don, That is sort oversimplifying the subject. Basically, how many load cycles a component can experience before failure is dependent on the material & the stress levels it experiences. If the the Sn curve is not exceeded there will be no issues. The Sn curve of carbon steels flattens out around 1,000,000 to 10,000,000 cycles. If the stress is below the Sn curve at that number of cycles, it can theoretically last forever. The moral of the story is not to unnecessarily stress components if you want they to have a long life. Running high pressure cartridges is unnecessary in my opinion since there isn't all that much more terminal ballistic performance gained by running +P pressure levels. +P generally means a pressure spec that is 10% above the standard cartridge pressure spec. Most .45 ACP cartridges run at about 19,000 psi chamber pressure. The SAAMI max. spec is 21,000 psi. The SAAMI +P max. pressure level is 23,000 psi.
Yep. Keeping things below the max loading is always better. In Diesel engines we found that about 60% would give an extremely long life where 80% would bring it down to manufacture's specs. DD said overhaul at 7500 hours and we ran them up to 14000 hours. When I finished the rebuild on it, we then ran it past 28000 hours since rebuild. Why the longer life compared to new? Because when rebuilt, the block had been seasoned by use. And then I rebuilt it to the tightest specs. The block of that engine likely would last 100,000 hours and just need a complete inspection before rebuilding. In road use, that would have been about 5 million miles of running.

Using Federal ammo as an example. The .45ACP is at 890FPS vs the 45ACP +P being at 950FPS with a 230gr bullet from a 5" barrel. 4" barrels drop it around 50 to 75 FPS so the +P would put it right back up there with the regular from a standard 1911.
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  #17  
Old 09-13-2018, 08:37 AM
Thirdcliff Thirdcliff is offline
 
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Location: South East Massachusetts
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Default 1911 Ammo Question

Is there any commercial 1911 ammo available with reduced loads that might be more appropriate to put through these antique firearms?
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  #18  
Old 09-13-2018, 09:56 AM
bandofM1 bandofM1 is offline
 
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changing another barrel reduces wear on barrel only. The slide and frame are what cracks,another barrel will not help.
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  #19  
Old 09-13-2018, 09:57 AM
pieceinthevalley pieceinthevalley is offline
 
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Thirdcliff- the Winchester "Victory" commemorative ammo currently advertised is supposedly loaded to original G.I. spec. Hope this helps.
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  #20  
Old 09-13-2018, 10:21 AM
Logdog Logdog is offline
 
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Most .45's were not shot to any degree, one or twice per year and then only a couple of hundred rounds. A rebuilt pistol is condition code A, rebuilt to as close to new as possible. Unless you see something wrong the pistol will be shooting after your are on the back side of the grass.
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