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  #1  
Old 05-09-2018, 05:09 PM
aopagary aopagary is offline
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 12
Default 1903A1 Springfield NM

have a few questions about a recent acquisition w/ some photos (under indoor lighting unfortunately... not the best)...



stock is not blemish free, but overall pretty nice.



serial number matches bolt and stock.



question about the rear sight. it is marked "R" on the right side two places. in the Brophy text (p195) it says... "The WWII Model 1903A1 rear sight leaf by Remington should not be confused with the NM type. The Remington leaves have coarsely struck graduations (mine do not) and are blued instead of being polished on the top surface (which mine are... polished). (but here is the ambiguous line...) They will also be marked with an "R" on the right side of the leaf"

ok... so does the "They will also" mean the the NM sight is also marked with an "R" or are they saying that only the Remington part is marked with an "R"?



3-39 barrel date, (P)roof mark and (H)ardened bayonet mount.



front sight is stamped "2", P.J.O'Hare front sight cover.







cutoff indent marks look like "H" "S" "8" ... and ideas?
Springfield Armory, Stanley P. Gibbs inspection.



butt hatch will not fully open... hope it is fixable, but not something i can't live without.

one other thing that is not exactly clear... when i read about the NM rifles, there is mention of ... "The Board also directed the Armory to provide bolt sleeves having reversed safety locks for those riflemen desiring them at the National Matches. (The reversed safety with the thumb-piece on the right side, instead of the left, preventing injury to the nose of riflemen who "crawls" the stock)"

not really familiar with "crawls the stock" but can probably guess. but on my rifle, ready is left, safe is to the right. seems like the normal positions(?) my guess is that the key is "for those riflemen desiring them" and some (most?) were not modified with the reversed safety bolt sleeve.

thanks...gary

Last edited by aopagary; 05-09-2018 at 07:03 PM.
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  #2  
Old 05-09-2018, 05:31 PM
Roadkingtrax Roadkingtrax is offline
 
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Location: AZ
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Nice rifle, in good company.

1526313A1NM 091839DCM RIFLE SALES 1922-42
YOURS <--------------------
1526330A1NM 041140DCM RIFLE SALES 1922-42
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  #3  
Old 05-09-2018, 05:35 PM
cplnorton cplnorton is offline
 
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We have a document that states in the late 30's, the 8 in the mag cutoff is for the year. So 1938 is when the stock was made.

Hey this is an off question. Can I see a pic of the star mark on the muzzle? This wold help me tremendously in my research. Thank you sir!
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  #4  
Old 05-09-2018, 07:00 PM
aopagary aopagary is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cplnorton View Post
We have a document that states in the late 30's, the 8 in the mag cutoff is for the year. So 1938 is when the stock was made.

Hey this is an off question. Can I see a pic of the star mark on the muzzle? This wold help me tremendously in my research. Thank you sir!
ok, i can see that makes sense (the 8), thanks.

i thought i might have missed something so luckily i left everything setup for a muzzle shot... tough to focus!!









two different angles... more flower looking, no?

cheers...gary
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  #5  
Old 05-09-2018, 06:48 PM
Cosine26 Cosine26 is offline
 
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The reverse safety for the M1903 was developed by K.K.V. Case , well known high power shooter from about 1900 to 1938. Casey was a "stock crawler" and most of his M1903 shooting was done using the "S" stock. I also was a stock crawler, and using the "S" stock often received a bloody nose from the safety lever hitting my nose. Casey developed the reversed safety so that it lay to the right when on "Ready" instead of the left-thus elimination the possibility of it hitting his nose. It was introduced in 1921 and , unlike the headless cocking piece, was permitted throughout the life of the M1903 as an option. The reversed safety would be the bane of existence for the left handed shooter.
Having the safety hit your nose would make a "flincher out of a cigar store Indian.'
FWIW
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  #6  
Old 05-09-2018, 06:54 PM
Cosine26 Cosine26 is offline
 
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The following obituary, with photo, appears in the December, 1938 issue of American Rifleman magazine.

The Great Scorebook was closed for another of that little group of long range riflemen who not only made American shooting history but who had much to do with the remaking of the American arms and ammunition industry, when Major K.K.V. Casey died at the Homeopathic Hospital in Wilmington, Delaware on October 18th.Never willing to accept the established order of things until his own investigation had satisfied him of the merits of existing practices, Casey was constantly experimenting and urging experimentation in everything having to do with the shooting game.In his younger days an ardent and intelligent handloader, Major Casey remained to his death a proponent of the theory that the encouragement of intelligent handloading was beneficial to the game as a whole. He was largely responsible for the square bullseye experiment which was tried at Camp Perry several years ago. While a firm believer in the necessity of training and individual marksmanship, he viewed this as an essential first step only, and the original Infantry Match musketry problem as fired at Camp Perry was based largely on his suggestions. His interest in small arms originated in his experiences as a member of the 71st New York Regiment in the Santiago Campaign in Cuba. He was a past master of the vagaries of the Krag at long ranges, and his endless experiments with the effect of wind velocities and temperature and humidity changes on the Krag and its ammunition served him well when the Springfield came into being as the principal National Match target arm.Major Casey was a member of the Palma Team of 1902, 1903, 1907, 1912 and 1913. He was Team Captain of the Palma Team in 1923. He was a member of the American Olympic Team in 1908.He won the Wimbledon Cup in 1902, 1907 and 1908, the only man to have accomplished this feat since the turn of the century. In 1908 he also won the Leech, being the only modern rifleman to have won the Wimbledon and the Leech in the same year. He won the National Individual Military Championship of the United States in 1903,the Spencer in 1904 and the Thurston and Hayes Matches in 1905. His long practical experience as a shooter and his restless study and research enabled him to contribute a great deal to the development of boat-tail ammunition and progressive burning powders. He was one of the earlier proponents of the gilding metal-jacketed bullet as a means of eliminating the once familiar but now almost unknown cupro-nickel fouling.As a team coach, Major Casey had few equals. He entered the service of th DuPont Company in 1905, having attracted the attention of Colonel J.G. Ewing, then the head of the Rifle Smokeless Division. By a strange trick of fate, Colonel Ewing's death was reported in the November issue of The American Rifleman, concurrently with the notice of Major Casey's death.Major Casey worked in the Smokeless Powder Operating Department until 1911, when he was transferred to the Military Sales Department, under the late Colonel E.G. Buckner. He became manager of the Rifle Smokeless Division of the DuPont Company in 1914. At that time, a Major in the Pennsylvania National Guard, he took his battalion of Infantrymen to the Mexican Border, resigning his commission when the outfit was turned into a Field Artillery Regiment. Throughout the World War his services to the DuPont Company and the War Department were invaluable and in 1921 he was appointed Director Of Military Sales. He was a long-time Director of the National Rifle Association and member of the National Board for Promotion of Rifle Practice. A little known side of his character was his interest in music. He played the flute and bassoon and was an active member of the Wilmington Symphony Orchestra. Despite a painful infection growing out of an ingrowing toenail, Major Casey attended the meeting of the National Board for Promotion of Rifle Practice at Camp Perry during the National Matches this year. He was hospitalized shortly after his return to Wilmington, and it was soon found necessary to amputate one leg just below the knee. He rallied and appeared to be on the road to recovery following the operation, but the infection had spread too far and he died shortly before 11 P.M. on October 18th.Funeral services were held in Wilmington, but interment was in the 71st Regiment San Juan Burial Plot at Mt. Hope Cemetery, New York.
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  #7  
Old 05-09-2018, 06:56 PM
colemanw colemanw is offline
 
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That rifle is badass
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  #8  
Old 05-09-2018, 07:43 PM
cplnorton cplnorton is offline
 
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Thank you very much sir. This helps me a great deal. This 1.52 NM serial range is one I study a lot, and I was very curious what your star guage stamp would look like as all I had seen so far have been from the Marine rifle teams.

The Marines ordered 150NM for the 1940 Season, and since SA was doing work with the Garands, it appears that Frankford Arsenal assembled the 150 NM's for the Marines.

As with your rifle, most are 3/39 SA barrels with that distinct style star guage stamp like your rifle. Which they appear different than the ones you normally see on earlier years.

That is a very nice National Match! I do think the sight has been swapped at some point, but otherwise it looks good to me!
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Old 05-09-2018, 10:15 PM
pickax pickax is offline
 
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Thank you for showing a great rifle, and all for a great thread!
A flowery turtle, very interesting. I'd of called fake without this knowledge.
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  #10  
Old 05-10-2018, 07:27 AM
cplnorton cplnorton is offline
 
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I have a couple theories on why the change, but nothing I can prove. But these distinct star stamps show up on these 1.52's. I've seen them on the 3/39 and 6/39 barrels.

Here are two more on 1.52's very close to the OP's rifle and these were on Marine NM rifle team rifles from the 1940 season. These rifles were assembled at Frankford Arsenal according to the Marine docs.

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