Go Back   CMP Forums > CMP Sales > Accessories
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 12-30-2017, 07:59 PM
Oldvetteman Oldvetteman is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Larkspur, Colorado
Posts: 990
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tester19 View Post
My Grandfather ran a shoe repair business for 35 years and knew leather. He was of the opinion that neatsfoot oil has no business around leather products. Period. It makes leather spongy and rots out the stitching. Saddle soap is OK. The white cream type conditioners are generally OK. Based on my own experience with saddles and tack, Lexol products are pretty good. Lay off the oil and grease.
+1 on Lexol Conditioner. I use it on anything leather that I want to last...leather couches, slings, holsters, belts, car seats. It is water soluble, easy to apply, soaks INTO the leather (rather than sitting on top), is not oily or greasy. It can get a little sticky if you apply more than the leather can take, in which case you simply wipe it down with a damp cloth and let it dry. Almost no smell and definitely no perfumes. Read up on it and you will be impressed.

Not a stock holder, but probably should be.
__________________
Everything I own needs fixin'
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 03-12-2018, 05:35 PM
postal postal is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 39
Default

Meguiar's is good and probably contains the same stuff, but the easiest thing to use that will not start rot or mildew, will not promote any acceleration opf drying or cracking would be a treatment with LANOLIN in it.
Go to any tack store, Fleet Farm, Farm and Fleet, etc. and buy a small tub of "Harness and tack" dressing.
Leather naturally has oils like lanolin in it and hardens as it ages and dries out.
Adding a healthy dose to a leather item will make it somewhat waterproof soften the leather up, reduce the risk of cracking and preserve the leather better than almost anything else, and very inexpensively.

The stuff is made to protect leather from the sweat of horses and the elements, and it works really well!

Want to get it to soak in with just one coat? Warm the sling up in the oven on
warm" to say, 150 degrees or so, then apply a heavy coat and roll the sling up in a ziploc bag. Let it sit for a day then wipe off all excess with a chunk of old denim.
Of course, some shooters don't like the looseness of an oiled sling and prefer the leather to be stiff so it won't stretch.
If you are planning to shoot with it, maybe dry is best. Try it first. For carrying, maybe add a light treatment and try it....you can always add more later if it isn't soft enough.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 03-12-2018, 07:06 PM
Turner Saddlery, Inc. Turner Saddlery, Inc. is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Clay, Alabama
Posts: 165
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by postal View Post
Want to get it to soak in with just one coat? Warm the sling up in the oven on warm" to say, 150 degrees or so, then apply a heavy coat and roll the sling up in a ziploc bag. Let it sit for a day then wipe off all excess with a chunk of old denim.
Of course, some shooters don't like the looseness of an oiled sling and prefer the leather to be stiff so it won't stretch.
If you are planning to shoot with it, maybe dry is best. Try it first. For carrying, maybe add a light treatment and try it....you can always add more later if it isn't soft enough.
Good way to ruin a sling. Never artificially heat leather, especially vegetable tanned leather, which slings and most strap goods are made of. This goes against any and all recommendations regarding (vegetable tanned) leather care.

Some preservative/conditioner companies suggest to warm boots with a hair dryer, but boots are made from chrome tanned leather, not vegetable tanned leather of which slings are made of. Heated oil (warmed) is used for deep penetration, such as after cleaning draft harness. Where you warm the oil, not the leather. When I say warm the oil, 115 degrees should be enough; however, it will penetrate deep and most likely soak the leather through on a piece such as a sling, making a shooting sling unusable. Heated oil is used primarily when treating dry harness parts, which are made from harness leather and is much thicker, layered and sewn from 1/4" up to 1/2" thick.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 03-13-2018, 12:12 PM
pinholeshoot pinholeshoot is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: tx
Posts: 108
Default

I use lanolin based oil on the flesh side of the leather. Not too much, just enough to make it supple and take the crackle out of the leather.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 03-16-2018, 11:35 AM
jimthompson502002 jimthompson502002 is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: La Crosse, Wisconsin
Posts: 2,605
Default

Real good idea: DO NOT use the "sling wrap" with one that's dried out, even if it seems to have revived with treatment.

I lost several rather valuable authentic straps doing that, including my very last 3-hook, 1917-dated (yes, apparently the slings were being produced before the rifle was adopted) B.A.R. "1907/modified".

They send to snap.

In fact, I try to avoid using old ones even for simple carry.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:21 PM.