Go Back   CMP Forums > CMP Sales > CMP Bolt Action Rifles
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 05-17-2016, 08:28 AM
S99VG S99VG is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Northern California
Posts: 1,984
Default

Did the insurance more than cover the value of the rifle? Heck, I may have taken the money if so. But that's me and I'm not saying that you made a wrong decision. Your 1903 came out nice and the only thing I see that could make it nicer would be for the seller to help you out with the cost of repair. I still think he's responsible for inadequate packing - but that too may be "water under the bridge" and that's okay too.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 05-17-2016, 10:50 AM
jgaynor jgaynor is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: NNJ
Posts: 1,330
Default

I would also like to add my kudos to Sparx for the excellent stock repair.

However i too would like to see pictures of the carton and the nature of the damage.

Shipping firearms and "which carrier does the best job" is a topic which surfaces in these forums regularly. Personally I think s99vg has a point about the packaging. Rifles in particular are somewhat vulnerable due to their length. Has any one ever broken down a rifle before packing? Some, like M1's for example would be easy. Bolt guns more difficult. But the result would be a more compact and rugged package.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 05-17-2016, 02:47 PM
NMC_EXP NMC_EXP is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 229
Default Advice

Some advice for everyone who ships/receives rifles:

A buyer should insist the shipper field strip the rifle: (a) remove the bolt, and remove barreled receiver from the stock, (c) wrap the individual components separately.

A seller ought to do this without being asked.

Reasons being (1) the bolt handle acts as a fulcrum to put a bending load thru the stock wrist, and (2) with the barreled receiver in the stock there is a longer "lever" to apply even more load in thru the stock wrist with or without the bolt installed.

Figure on the box containing the rifle resting crossways on another box - classic teeter-totter. Then pile a ton of other boxes on top and bounce it down the road in a semi-trailer a few hundred miles.

Not to forget the 300 lb Bubba material handler stepping on it a time or two.
__________________
“After all is said and done, successful rifle shooting on the range is nothing more than first finding a rifle and lot of ammunition which will do precisely the same thing shot after shot, and then developing the same skill in the rifleman.” ~ Capt. E. C. Crossman (Book of the Springfield)
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 05-17-2016, 07:03 PM
IditarodJoe IditarodJoe is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 1,070
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NMC_EXP View Post
A buyer should insist the shipper field strip the rifle: (a) remove the bolt, and remove barreled receiver from the stock, (c) wrap the individual components separately.
Really? I would strongly disagree. Removing the stock from a 1903 shortens the length by a mere 3.25 inches. The result is that the thinnest and most vulnerable parts of the wood no longer benefit from the rigidity provided by the BR.

Still like the idea? OK, to remove the BR from the stock, the seller would need to do one of two things. Either remove the front sight blade to get the bands off of the BR and then pack the blade, pin, and bands separately, or try to secure the bands in place while still on the barrel in such a way that they don't get bent. Which approach would you recommend?

Personally, I'd rather just discuss packing with the seller to ensure that the rifle will be as secure as possible, and then insure it for it's full value.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 05-17-2016, 08:09 PM
dschur dschur is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Naperville, IL
Posts: 195
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IditarodJoe View Post
Really? I would strongly disagree. Removing the stock from a 1903 shortens the length by a mere 3.25 inches. The result is that the thinnest and most vulnerable parts of the wood no longer benefit from the rigidity provided by the BR.

Still like the idea? OK, to remove the BR from the stock, the seller would need to do one of two things. Either remove the front sight blade to get the bands off of the BR and then pack the blade, pin, and bands separately, or try to secure the bands in place while still on the barrel in such a way that they don't get bent. Which approach would you recommend?

Personally, I'd rather just discuss packing with the seller to ensure that the rifle will be as secure as possible, and then insure it for it's full value.
I'm with you - no need to remove the action from the stock for shipping, that's just crazy talk.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 05-17-2016, 11:42 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is online now
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: AL
Posts: 3,428
Default

I enjoy working on stocks, and am happy to make some minor and typical repairs, but whenever I see work like this I remain amazed. I am not 100% convinced the "repaired" stock is the same stock that was broken. I have had a few people ask me for assistance repairing stocks (some of you may have seen some of my stock cleaning/finishing/care threads); there are a few on the boards who have a track record of work like this. I am convinced it involves voodoo, and will be the first in line to use them as needed.

A few things came to light reading the comments about the shipping.
1. The seller insured the shipment (presumably for a reasonable amount). How else should he "stand behind the sale"? Stuff happens, and the OP confirmed the sellers reputation elsewhere. He insured it, why would he incur further loss?
2. I like the suggestion the box was caught in a conveyer bend, having been in enough shipping hubs that seems likely.
3. What struck me is that the box was in "unmarked" (=undamaged?) condition. If something caused the damage, and presumably it was not damaged when shipped, who/when was it repacked? I have received packages that were repacked by the shipper for various reasons, interesting.
4. All reading this thread should note the details of the insurance. It pays the value (as in value paid by shipper) but doing so you forfeit the item. Makes sense, good to know, I never thought about that as related to issues like this.
JH
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 05-18-2016, 12:36 AM
stevekaw stevekaw is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Maryland
Posts: 473
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by S99VG View Post
Did the insurance more than cover the value of the rifle? Heck, I may have taken the money if so. But that's me and I'm not saying that you made a wrong decision. Your 1903 came out nice and the only thing I see that could make it nicer would be for the seller to help you out with the cost of repair. I still think he's responsible for inadequate packing - but that too may be "water under the bridge" and that's okay too.
When you insure something through the Postal Service, they charge you for it. Therefore, the seller has no incentive to insure the shipment for anything more than the sale price. And if you file a claim on an insured item, the Postal Service requires the buyer to provide evidence of value and of payment. They are not going pay out for any claim in excess of the actual purchase price.

In reality, we'll never know how my rifle's stock was so badly broken. It's possible that the dealer sent me a rifle with the stock already broken. It's also possible that the Postal Service mangled the original shipping box and then re-packed it as the box that was delivered was almost totally unmarked, except for some scuff marks. Certainly, the seller's packing job could have been better - the rifle was surrounded by just two layers of bubblewrap and then the box was filled with crumpled-up newspaper. But I've seen even worse packing jobs where a rifle arrived totally undamaged.

I guess I could have just taken the money and run. The local Postmaster was very sympathetic and offered to approve my claim after inspecting the shipping box and broken rifle. But the thought of sending a rifle over 100 years old to end up either getting destroyed or in a crappy postal auction was more than I could bear. So, I politely refused the offer and decided to try to get the stock repaired. Fortunately, I chose the right craftsman (Sparx) to do the job.

And yes, I got back the same stock from Arizona that I sent out to Sparx to work on; he is that good!

Last edited by stevekaw; 05-18-2016 at 12:40 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 05-18-2016, 01:05 AM
stevekaw stevekaw is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Maryland
Posts: 473
Default Box My Rifle Arrived In...

For those of you who expressed interest in seeing the shipping box in which my broken rifle arrived courtesy of the US Postal Service:

The front: http://kowpie.tumblr.com/image/144541352919

The rear/back: http://kowpie.tumblr.com/image/144541329874

The inside/shipping materials: http://kowpie.tumblr.com/image/144541450854

Like I've said, the box seems to be in very good shape given that the stock was totally busted when I removed the bubblewrap: http://kowpie.tumblr.com/image/144541732369

Like I said, we'll probably never get the whole story!
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 05-18-2016, 09:55 PM
Jpm Jpm is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 1,404
Default

Extraordinary work! I'm speechless.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 05-18-2016, 11:06 PM
S99VG S99VG is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Northern California
Posts: 1,984
Default

Bubble wrap and newspaper! What a frikin' idiot. You gotta love it when a seller gets so reckless with other people's money and possessions - which it became the instant he cashed your check.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:21 PM.