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  #11  
Old 03-08-2018, 07:05 AM
Polaris Polaris is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Central Minnesota
Posts: 784
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On your trigger pull, find where the sear engages the bolt. A little careful work with a dremel and a buffing wheel will help make it more consistent. Also thoroughly de-grease the trigger group and disassembled bolt, then re-lube with a little moly or CLP.

They are neat rifles. The rear tang screw tends to work loose, use some removable Loctite here. The screw in front of the magazine can also use this. Check your top handguard for slop. If it moves around, some shaved match sticks or playing card piece shims here will improve accuracy.

They also tend to shoot high. Fortunately, a finishing nail and a small dot of solder is a good fit for the front sight post. Start high (will shoot low) and file to zero with your loads.

As above, they have a kick like cheap vodka, you're best to stick with 150 grain loads. If you reload, the 123 grain "SKS" bullets shoot well in these to 300m with less recoil than 150 or heavier.
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  #12  
Old 03-08-2018, 08:16 AM
BigsWick BigsWick is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 173
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A 91/30 was my first C&R rifle. It came with everything when they were sold with slings, bayonets, ammo pouches, tool kits, and oilers. True, they are crude compared to Enfields or Mausers, but with some time, experimentation and patience they can be a lot of fun. I have a $99 forced-matched 1942 Izhevsk that can ring steel with irons at 500 yards with Wolf black box 149gr. Raises eyebrows at the range and draws interest. Probably my best $99 firearms purchase ever.

I bought several 91/30s, M44s, and M38s when they were still cheap and plentiful because I believed the supply would dry up one day and they'd become sought after. I didn't foresee events in the Ukraine being the main cause, but then it happened. Now some of the same people claiming they would never own a "peasant" rifle are asking me to sell them one. Prices have climbed X3 or X4, depending on model. The later Molot exports are really nice compared to the earlier Century guns, and they don't have the huge Century dot-matrix billboard.

Polaris
has given some solid advice in his post. If it shoots high some wire insulation or heat shrink over the front sight post can be trimmed to size. Experiment with ammo- 149, 174 or 203gr. You typically find one it likes best, then buy in bulk. I have a really nice all matching 1933 hex Tula (including matching bayonet) that shoots 6"-8" high with anything other than 203gr.

Sticky bolt syndrome often goes away with use, but make sure the rifle is truly clean and cosmoline free. Initially you might need to convince the bolt to unlock after 20 or 30 rounds. We used to bring a rubber mallet to the range with us to give a non cooperative bolt a little whack. People thought we were crazy. Good times!

The carbines are fun. Loud. Fireball! Every one I've cleaned up and put into service has been pretty darn accurate out of the box with the slightest of sight adjustments. M44s need the bayonet extended when shooting- barrel harmonics as it was explained to me, and it does make a huge difference in accuracy.

Recoil can be brutal if you aren't prepared. I woke up many Monday mornings with "Mosin shoulder" (as we called it)- a big bruise- until I learned to pull the rifle in tight and get a solid cheek weld. Let your body absorb the kick.

Above all, enjoy!
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  #13  
Old 03-08-2018, 12:13 PM
amadeus76 amadeus76 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 75
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The bolt is actually surprisingly slick, so I don't think that will be a concern. I've ordered a new front sight base and adjustable post from smith-sights, but outside of that I plan on shooting it stock before I start tinkering with it, just so I have a baseline to judge by. After that tho I'll probably shim it with the brass kit he sells and possibly pillar bed it as well. I will almost certainly swap the trigger out for a Finnish one.
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  #14  
Old 03-09-2018, 08:55 PM
A7Dave A7Dave is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: AKexpat
Posts: 451
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stewbaby View Post
Everybody needs on. A M44 ‘flamethrower’ is always good also. ...then spoil yourself with a M39 Finnish Mosin
Mosins used to be plentiful. I'm thinking about getting a M39, is there a go to source for them these days?
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  #15  
Old 03-09-2018, 10:50 PM
broomhandle broomhandle is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Augusta GA- X NYC guy
Posts: 359
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Hi A7Dave,

Empire arms has them from time to time. You will pay a little more, because he handpicks every rifle he sells! I'm happy with the rifles I bought from him!

A woman by the name of Pat Burns sold a bunch, think she is still selling on line. Her husband lost his FFL for some reason, so she sells as a individual now.
I know 4 or 5 people that bought from her & are very happy with the rifles. Some people online don't care for her. Check on her yourself.

broom
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  #16  
Old 03-10-2018, 12:48 AM
A7Dave A7Dave is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: AKexpat
Posts: 451
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Thanks for the info. Classic Arms seems to be out of almost everything.

Do you know where Pat Burns operates her business? There is a Gunbroker seller that seems to fit the bill out of Gettysburg, PA, seller "abncav"?

Looking at Classic Arms, it figures. I usually miss the good deals. Would have been great to pick one up two years ago. I was busy then and not paying attention. Don't know if you follow any of the Alaskan "reality" TV shows. Chip Hailstone of "Life Below Zero" loves the M39 Finns and has shot them for years. Because of his writing, I've wanted one, but only recently decided to follow through and now the well is close to dry. Need to start hitting the gunshows again.
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  #17  
Old 03-10-2018, 12:31 PM
ZvenoMan ZvenoMan is offline
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: AL
Posts: 3,105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amadeus76 View Post
The bolt is actually surprisingly slick, so I don't think that will be a concern.
You would be wise to google sticky bolt. A slick bolt is not related to the issue.

I have a dozen or so Mosin Nagants, some are immune, most are not. Know the common causes and contributing factors and be ready to experience it.
Most agree that it is ammo related but ammo that sticks in one may not in another.
Most agree that brass ammo is the only 100% solution. But the problem is not fatal, so the bolt sticks.....

JH
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  #18  
Old 03-10-2018, 01:59 PM
BigsWick BigsWick is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 173
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZvenoMan View Post
You would be wise to google sticky bolt. A slick bolt is not related to the issue.

I have a dozen or so Mosin Nagants, some are immune, most are not. Know the common causes and contributing factors and be ready to experience it.
Most agree that it is ammo related but ammo that sticks in one may not in another.
Most agree that brass ammo is the only 100% solution. But the problem is not fatal, so the bolt sticks.....

JH
^^^^

Lots of wisdom here.

Ammo is the chief cause of sticky bolt syndrome, or at least that's been my experience too. Again, as I wrote in my above post, make sure the rifle is really clean, and with use the problems seem to fade.

A lot of the Czech, Russian, and Bulgarian surplus ammo is copper washed steel cased, and I've had much better luck with that regarding sticky bolts than I have had with commercial that is lacquer or polymer coated. The downside is that it is corrosive, so a complete disassembly and cleaning with hot water and Hoppes or similar is in order.

Surplus was a deal at 12˘ per round, and I put up with the cleaning due to cost savings with commercial being 50˘ or 60˘ per round, even higher at times. But, with the surplus ammo gone from easy availability, the last time I checked it was selling for over 25˘ a round.

Commercial is non corrosive, but the coating on the steel cases will start to stick in a hot chamber. I've experienced this with Wolf, Tula, and all of the Bears. The straight short throw of the Mosin Nagant bolt also complicates the problem.

Don't get discouraged if it happens. With use it will "loosen" up and eventually all but go away.
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  #19  
Old 03-10-2018, 02:07 PM
broomhandle broomhandle is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Augusta GA- X NYC guy
Posts: 359
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Hi A7 Dave,

I googled -Pat Burns Finn rifles? - the website is down! many 0ld links that mention her.
If you contact Dennis at Empire arms by E- mail he will locate one for you in short order. The price might be a little high but we get what we pay for & it will work & shoot well!

Good Luck.
broom
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  #20  
Old 03-10-2018, 03:00 PM
amadeus76 amadeus76 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZvenoMan View Post
Most agree that brass ammo is the only 100% solution. But the problem is not fatal, so the bolt sticks.....
Shouldn’t be an issue then. I’m gonna start with some Winchester white box to rough sight in and put some rounds thru. After that I’ll start reloading for it.
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