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  #1  
Old 07-09-2019, 04:20 PM
smoore smoore is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Western IA
Posts: 9
Default 45 Boyt M1911 holster - dye removal?

I picked up a 1945 Boyt holster for my RR/Ithaca 1911. My understanding is that this holster would have originally been brown in color, but that some time after WWII the Army ordered that remaining stocks of brown holsters be dyed black, which mine is. My question is, is there any way to safely remove the black dye and return the holster to its original brown color, or would I just be ruining an otherwise perfectly good holster?
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  #2  
Old 07-09-2019, 05:27 PM
coolhandluke coolhandluke is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Oklahoma City, OK
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No

You will only damage the leather and you would likely not be able to remove all of the dye anyway. Treat it as you would an arsenal rebuilt firearm...the dye job is part of its history.
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  #3  
Old 07-10-2019, 11:39 AM
Phil McGrath Phil McGrath is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Kent, Wa.
Posts: 650
Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by smoore View Post
I picked up a 1945 Boyt holster for my RR/Ithaca 1911. My understanding is that this holster would have originally been brown in color, but that some time after WWII the Army ordered that remaining stocks of brown holsters be dyed black, which mine is. My question is, is there any way to safely remove the black dye and return the holster to its original brown color, or would I just be ruining an otherwise perfectly good holster?

I think it was after 1953 leather holsters were dyed..

Saddle soap is a very aggressive cleaner that might remove the dye, the problem I see is getting out all of the dye out from around the stitching. After all is said and done it would need a good washing again too remove any remaining soap as well as a deep oiling too restore the leathers oils.
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Old 07-12-2019, 11:38 AM
Dingsbums Dingsbums is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Texas
Posts: 371
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I have the same problem, although mine is a Warren Leather Goods holster. I've been tempted to do the same myself. I wonder if something like this would do the trick without destroying the leather? https://angelusdirect.com/collection...r-and-deglazer
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  #5  
Old 07-13-2019, 02:06 PM
Turner Saddlery, Inc. Turner Saddlery, Inc. is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Clay, Alabama
Posts: 185
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dingsbums View Post
I have the same problem, although mine is a Warren Leather Goods holster. I've been tempted to do the same myself. I wonder if something like this would do the trick without destroying the leather? https://angelusdirect.com/collection...r-and-deglazer
Don't do it, never use deglazing fluid on vegetable tanned leather, which is what your holster is made of. Deglazing fluid is basically made from acetone and ethyl alcohol.

Deglazing fluid is used to strip the glazed finish and dye from articles made from chrome tanned leather, which is tanned with chromium salts. You deglaze items in preparation for re-dying and the process will not strip the leather back to its natural state/color, an item which is black will turn a mottled slate gray. Generally, once an item is deglazed, you must re-dye with the same shade of dye or dye that is more opaque. Articles such as boots, shoes, and leather upholstery are made with chrome tanned leather. The deglazing fluid will burn the surface of vegetable tanned leather, in addition, it will remove what natural oils which are left in the leather and dry out the fibers making it stiff and brittle.

Regards,

Richard
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Old 07-13-2019, 02:20 PM
Dingsbums Dingsbums is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Texas
Posts: 371
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turner Saddlery, Inc. View Post
Don't do it, never use deglazing fluid on vegetable tanned leather, which is what your holster is made of. Deglazing fluid is basically made from acetone and ethyl alcohol.

Regards,

Richard
Well, scratch that idea. Thank you Richard.
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