Go Back   CMP Forums > CMP Sales > Accessories
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-28-2011, 10:53 PM
easyv easyv is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 242
Default "Greek" park 1905's, really US park?

I was thumbing through my copy of Poyer/Reisch's "M1 Garand" and came upon the 1905 section.

The book details to M1905's, the Type I and the Type II. The Type I was produced before 1921, and originally had a "bright blade and a blued ricasso before 1917"

After WWI, "thousands ...were refinished (parkerized)".

They also note the Type I's were marked with date of manufacture and a serial number, and that only very few produced in 1906 did not have the serial number.

The Type II on the other hand, was sub-contracted out to contractors and produced in 1942/3, were parkerized from the start, and did not have serial numbers on them.

After reading the other 1905 de-park/de-serial number thread...it strikes me that a bunch of folks may have "buba'd" their 1905's.

Not a bayonet expert, just sharing something I ran across, something to think about before you take that 1905 to the grinder wheel

Last edited by easyv; 11-28-2011 at 10:57 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-29-2011, 12:04 AM
Sarge1998 Sarge1998 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 468
Default

US park doesn't come off with acetone. I don't care for the Greek black and it does come off with little effort. Underneath you find the US park still holding it's own. Can't speak for everyone, but that's what mine are like, both 12" as well as 16".
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-29-2011, 09:03 AM
sergeant major sergeant major is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Severn, Maryland
Posts: 288
Default

I too received a SA 16 Bayonet from CMP last month, it was in Greek black and has a stamped number on the cross guard. After reading all the threads these past weeks on the yeas and nays about removing the Greek black I retreated to my work bench with a bottle of naval jelly, first testing the tip. I liked the results (a nice gray park) and decided to do the rest of the blade. See pictures below.




__________________
U.S. Army Retired 1990
Vietnam Vet, '66, '68, '70
Member: Garand Collectors Association
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-29-2011, 09:08 AM
sergeant major sergeant major is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Severn, Maryland
Posts: 288
Default

Picture one shows what I received from CMP (1905 with Greek black)
Picture two after applying Naval Jelly
Picture three with the CMP scabbard I received
Pictures four and five show left and right ricasso
__________________
U.S. Army Retired 1990
Vietnam Vet, '66, '68, '70
Member: Garand Collectors Association
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-29-2011, 10:03 AM
captain-03 captain-03 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Cntrl Mississippi
Posts: 1,789
Default

I like!! Now if we could just get rid of those stamped numbers!!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-29-2011, 03:41 PM
gap gap is online now
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,489
Default

Does anyone notice that the grips don't fit properly at the pommel on the US serial number side of the bayonet? I have the same problem with my 1918 dated M1905. Were the plastic grips made differently?
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-29-2011, 04:00 PM
Sarge1998 Sarge1998 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 468
Default

The black grips are in the area of 65-70 years old, I'm not a chemist but they maintained shape pretty good through some possible adverse conditions. Following is an article from bayo-points...

The Grips:

Experiments had been made with plastic grip materials beginning in late 1941, and by April 1942 it had been determined that the grip material would be "a material similar to Durez No. 1905 with Rogers Board insert" (from United States Army Edged Weapons Report 1917-1945). Durez is a brand name of Phenol-Formaldehyde resin similar to Bakelite. Shortly afterward (June 29, 1942) this specification was written to include other similar thermoplastic resins as Plastic Bayonet Grips, Grade B of SXS-103 Phenolic-Molded Shapes for Small Arms Components. This material is often generically called Bakelite, although that is a brand name rather than a chemical name.

The rest of the article can be read at:

http://www.usmilitaryknives.com/bayo_points_23.htm

Last edited by Sarge1998; 11-29-2011 at 04:02 PM. Reason: Additional
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-29-2011, 04:17 PM
gap gap is online now
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,489
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarge1998 View Post
The black grips are in the area of 65-70 years old, I'm not a chemist but they maintained shape pretty good through some possible adverse conditions. Following is an article from bayo-points...

The Grips:

Experiments had been made with plastic grip materials beginning in late 1941, and by April 1942 it had been determined that the grip material would be "a material similar to Durez No. 1905 with Rogers Board insert" (from United States Army Edged Weapons Report 1917-1945). Durez is a brand name of Phenol-Formaldehyde resin similar to Bakelite. Shortly afterward (June 29, 1942) this specification was written to include other similar thermoplastic resins as Plastic Bayonet Grips, Grade B of SXS-103 Phenolic-Molded Shapes for Small Arms Components. This material is often generically called Bakelite, although that is a brand name rather than a chemical name.

The rest of the article can be read at:

http://www.usmilitaryknives.com/bayo_points_23.htm
IMHO, there is too much of a gap to be accounted for by shrinkage. I believe it has something to do with the way the pommels on the M1905 and Model 1905 bayonets were made. Where is bayonetman to the rescue?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-29-2011, 07:46 PM
easyv easyv is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 242
Default

OK, I can see the difference on this set of pics...wasn't clear to me the difference in the other thread...

Also, seeing the SN stamped on the blade helped too...had it in my head the ricasso #'s may have been the US #'s...make sense now.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-29-2011, 08:07 PM
tommy5230 tommy5230 is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: San Angelo, Texas
Posts: 52
Default

I wonder what the naval jelly treatment would do to a greek black Garand ???
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:34 AM.