Go Back   CMP Forums > CMP General > Ask Each Other
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1671  
Old 11-06-2019, 04:32 PM
USAF Sarge USAF Sarge is online now
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Panama City, Florida
Posts: 737
Default

As of 45 minutes ago, he was still listed as missing. I hope they find him to bring closure to the family, both his blood family and his military family.

From the sounds of it he was a 24th SOW Special Tactics Airman, so not an aircrew member.

Depending at what altitude his chute deployed, he could have experienced a hard water landing. While I understand the aircraft was at 1,500 feet when he went out, unless he was hooked to a static line he would had to deployed the chute manually. I won't try and remember the decent rates and times. But it didn't give him much time to get his chute open, have a full canopy and his decent rate to slow much before hitting the water.

Seeing the normal decent rate under a C-9 canopy is at average a 1,000 feet per minute. ST troops use a T series chute if I recall correctly. From the the way the articles are written, while his chute deployed he seem to hit the water pretty quick, if they saw him treading water. When the aircraft came back around and the crew tried to reestablish visual they couldn't. Doesn't sound good, could have be drugged under by his canopy.

All this is speculation at this time. I hope for the best, and I hope I'm wrong, but it seems like a BR at this time, seeing he's been in the water now approximately 28 hours.
__________________
Mike
TSgt, USAF Retired
Jan 86 - Sept 08
Aircrew Life Support
"Your Life Is Our Business"
(122X0, 1T1X1, 1P0X1)
NRA Life Member
Reply With Quote
  #1672  
Old 11-09-2019, 10:41 AM
Carriec Carriec is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Virginia
Posts: 333
Default

So an AT602 crashes while doing a "gender reveal" pink water drop? The one fact we can always count on.. there will never be a shortage of DA's. This one doesn't get the Darwin Award though.
Reply With Quote
  #1673  
Old 11-09-2019, 07:54 PM
grumpa72 grumpa72 is online now
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Moon Township, PA
Posts: 2,331
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carriec View Post
So an AT602 crashes while doing a "gender reveal" pink water drop? The one fact we can always count on.. there will never be a shortage of DA's. This one doesn't get the Darwin Award though.
We've had several "gender reveals" in the 2 most recent generations of my family. They are called births and the father is the one who gets to announce the gender. Yeah, I'm old school and think it's silly that all of the new pregnancy announcements are a gender reveal. And to crash an airplane doing it?

Ok, off my soap box.
Reply With Quote
  #1674  
Old 11-09-2019, 07:59 PM
USAF Sarge USAF Sarge is online now
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Panama City, Florida
Posts: 737
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by grumpa72 View Post
We've had several "gender reveals" in the 2 most recent generations of my family. They are called births and the father is the one who gets to announce the gender. Yeah, I'm old school and think it's silly that all of the new pregnancy announcements are a gender reveal. And to crash an airplane doing it?

Ok, off my soap box.
Well said.......Our last kid was born in 92, and I didn't know that I finally got Daddy's Little Girl until she was born.

Sort of like Christmas presents, you find out when you open them, just saying.
__________________
Mike
TSgt, USAF Retired
Jan 86 - Sept 08
Aircrew Life Support
"Your Life Is Our Business"
(122X0, 1T1X1, 1P0X1)
NRA Life Member
Reply With Quote
  #1675  
Old 11-14-2019, 02:30 PM
FLD FLD is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Michigan
Posts: 311
Default

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Qv09xM1V2vU
C-130 start and powerback.
Reply With Quote
  #1676  
Old 11-14-2019, 03:52 PM
grumpa72 grumpa72 is online now
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Moon Township, PA
Posts: 2,331
Default

As you may know, backing a C-130 is easy - doing it well (on centerline the whole way) is an art form totally dependent on the skills of the loadmaster. The pilots had checkrides that included backing and the Loadmaster was evaluated on his backing instructions. Since the pilot faces forward and the LM backwards during backing, reference is always made to "turn towards number 1 (or 4)". The other "gotcha" is hitting the brakes while backing - it WILL sit the Herc on its tail. That is why part of my briefing was "my feet are flat on the floor". To stop the backing you come out of reverse and gently into the forward thrust range. It is a cool feeling to back up something that big and to do it well. Thank you Loadmasters!
Reply With Quote
  #1677  
Old 11-15-2019, 03:03 PM
FLD FLD is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Michigan
Posts: 311
Default

How were crews selected/assigned?
Reply With Quote
  #1678  
Old 11-15-2019, 04:54 PM
grumpa72 grumpa72 is online now
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Moon Township, PA
Posts: 2,331
Default

Assigned to the C-130 or how do C-130 crews get assigned to each other? I bid for Hercs upon AF pilot training graduation. Once I got qualified in them at Little Rock I was assigned as a copliot to the squadron but not to any particular crew. The scheduler would build the crews a few days in advance but we didn't have fixed crews. For a VERY short time we tried permanent crews where each member was permanently assigned to that crew, similar to B-52s as Strategic Air Command. It was a horrible
E less failure because of many reasons. Except for specialized missions like nuclear bomb carrying or L.A.P.E.S. missions (google it) every crew was qualified in all the various missions and airdrop types. LAPES was fun (I did it for a year) but dangerous. I know of one our crews who got killed when the airplane crashed due to center of gravity issues when the load got stuck partially out of the cargo bay.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dgg3iRaVnbw

or this

https://www.wearethemighty.com/artic...1#rebelltitem1

Essentially, you fly 5 feet above the ground (that's why the wheels are down) and an extraction chute is deployed dragging the load out of the airplane. Anything higher than 10 feet above the ground was likely to cause load damage and the offending crew would often be sent home. The army wanted 5 feet -no more, no less.

Last edited by grumpa72; 11-15-2019 at 05:03 PM. Reason: googled it for you
Reply With Quote
  #1679  
Old 11-15-2019, 08:57 PM
FLD FLD is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Michigan
Posts: 311
Default

I was, in fact, wondering how crews were assigned to each other, as you described.
I certainly understand how the load could cause a drastic CG change, resulting in the loss of aircraft and crew. If I recall correctly, a 747 freighter experienced a load shift shortly after takeoff in Bagram, resulting in loss of aircraft and crew.
Thank for the explanations and for the LAPES links.
I may have flown at gross weight (never over gross, or course) in several of the GA aircraft I've flown but I never flew at the back edge of the CG box in the pilots operating handbook.
BTW, two adults and full fuel tanks in a Tomahawk is right at (never over) gross weight. The weight and balance chart in the POH had a bunch of pencil dots right outside the top of the box, but always the center of the CG limits.
I did my instrument training and checkride in a Tomahawk, N4371E. I think the King radio stack was worth more than the airplane. But I was able to fly it for just the cost of the fuel, and I really enjoyed flying the Tomahawks that a friend of mine bought and sold. They had a little bit of a tail wag at the top of the yellow arc, but gosh, they sure flew nice.
I used to do instrument work almost every Sunday morning at KMKG, flying out of Z98, and the controllers got used to my preferred sequence of approaches. One Sunday morning the controller asked me what I wanted to do so I told him, ILS 32, back course 14, out to the hold, and then ILS 32, to which he replied, "seven-one Echo, that's not gonna work for us,,,,,,,,, Just kidding."

Last edited by FLD; 11-15-2019 at 09:07 PM. Reason: because I can't spell, being old and all.
Reply With Quote
  #1680  
Old 11-16-2019, 06:34 AM
grumpa72 grumpa72 is online now
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Moon Township, PA
Posts: 2,331
Default

"never over gross " that's a good thing. Our C-130 had two max gross weights - normal was 155000 and EWO, Emergency War Order at 175000. On our way to the gulf (first Gulf war) we were at 175000 and used ONE HELL OF A LOT of runway. Only did that one time and don't care to repeat it.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:33 PM.