Go Back   CMP Forums > CMP General > Ask Each Other > Reloading
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-30-2019, 02:12 PM
M829A3 M829A3 is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 13
Default Another general opinion question on bullets

Of the suppliers , ( Sierra, Nosler, Hornady, Berger, etc.) is there any that is thought or proven better or worse? Or is this a situation where 1 manufacturer makes a better single type than others, with everybody having their one or two winners ?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-30-2019, 02:50 PM
nf1e nf1e is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 2,285
Default

My thought is that Berger is way ahead of the others as far as quality and consistency.
Of coarse, we do pay a premium for that .
__________________
Semper Fi
Art
Sgt USMC 66 -72
RVN 67-68
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-30-2019, 02:55 PM
Gewehr43 Gewehr43 is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 2,612
Default

As usual the question...…..For what do you intend to use the bullets for?

Accuracy? Hunting?

Otherwise Berger is the premium bullet usually regarded as the best but price and they can be finicky.

But again use is the question...……….. for Garand matches (ie 200yds or less) you'd be wasting Bergers on that.
Otherwise its Chevy-Ford.
I happen to be a Sierra man but others are Hornady people.
__________________
Service Rifle.... RIP .... 1884-2015
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-31-2019, 09:59 AM
Kestrel4k Kestrel4k is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1,804
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by M829A3 View Post
Of the suppliers , ( Sierra, Nosler, Hornady, Berger, etc.) is there any that is thought or proven better or worse? Or is this a situation where 1 manufacturer makes a better single type than others, with everybody having their one or two winners ?
I have done considerable testing with light- to medium-weight (not match) bullets by most of the major manufacturers in a few rifles of calibers .223/.308/.358/.429". In virtually every instance in my research, I have found Hornady to have a slight but consistent advantage in accuracy.
I believe one of the reasons is that the Hornady ogive provides a more-forward driving band & longer shank, improving entry into the lands - particularly for bullets in the lighter weight range where the (full-diameter) shank length is only comparable to their caliber. Not having a substantial boat-tail also contributes to the longer shank.

Edit: For an illustration of this, feel free to compare pictures of the 40gr .223" Hornady vMax with the 40gr .223" Nosler BTV & Varmageddon bullets (with which I have done much testing) - the shorter length of the Nosler shanks for these light bullets are a slight but consistent disadvantage IMO.

-----

Please keep in mind that my testing has been on only mainstream bullets of 'typical' manufacturing quality, and is probably not indicative of match bullets where additional manufacturing resources & QC have been expended to ensure greater bullet uniformity. Furthermore, the longer shanks of the heavier match bullets are almost certainly a substantial advantage.

Personally, I have gotten considerable enjoyment by obtaining accuracy results considerably above the average from inexpensive mainstream bullets, rather than attempting to obtain the highest accuracy from match-type bullets.
Hope this helps & best regards,
__________________
Kestrel4k feedback thread

Last edited by Kestrel4k; 10-31-2019 at 10:11 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-31-2019, 01:02 PM
rcolarco rcolarco is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Maryland
Posts: 4,596
Send a message via AIM to rcolarco
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kestrel4k View Post
I have done considerable testing with light- to medium-weight (not match) bullets by most of the major manufacturers in a few rifles of calibers .223/.308/.358/.429". In virtually every instance in my research, I have found Hornady to have a slight but consistent advantage in accuracy.
I believe one of the reasons is that the Hornady ogive provides a more-forward driving band & longer shank, improving entry into the lands - particularly for bullets in the lighter weight range where the (full-diameter) shank length is only comparable to their caliber. Not having a substantial boat-tail also contributes to the longer shank.

Edit: For an illustration of this, feel free to compare pictures of the 40gr .223" Hornady vMax with the 40gr .223" Nosler BTV & Varmageddon bullets (with which I have done much testing) - the shorter length of the Nosler shanks for these light bullets are a slight but consistent disadvantage IMO.

-----

Please keep in mind that my testing has been on only mainstream bullets of 'typical' manufacturing quality, and is probably not indicative of match bullets where additional manufacturing resources & QC have been expended to ensure greater bullet uniformity. Furthermore, the longer shanks of the heavier match bullets are almost certainly a substantial advantage.

Personally, I have gotten considerable enjoyment by obtaining accuracy results considerably above the average from inexpensive mainstream bullets, rather than attempting to obtain the highest accuracy from match-type bullets.
Hope this helps & best regards,
In my experience Hornady varmint bullets shoot very well. However, for accuracy, they can't touch the Sierra 52 MK. In fact, the Sierra is the only light bullet I load in the .223, 5.56, and .22-250. It works fine as a varmint bullet, the prairie dogs and 'chucks don't seem to care, and it's cheap. If you want screaming velocity, you have to go lighter, of course.

I have never been impressed by Hornady match bullets compared to Sierra or Berger.

Your results may vary.
__________________
NRA-certified rifle (40 years), pistol, home firearms safety, and personal protection instructor
NRA-certified range safety officer
North Dakota and Maryland certified hunter safety instructor
ACEP-certified coach

Last edited by rcolarco; 10-31-2019 at 01:04 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-31-2019, 04:27 PM
Pappy Pappy is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 721
Default

Your rifle might like fine dining or it may like the dollar menu. Only your rifle knows for sure.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-31-2019, 05:44 PM
WindLogik WindLogik is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Washington State
Posts: 2,272
Default

I have shot a lot of the following bullets

Sierra: 77, 69, 80, 155
Berger: 80.5, 105, 155.5

These are the bullets I shoot for matches, they are all HPBT. I have shot thousands and thousands of these bullets in matches and not had a problem. I have tried the equivalents to these by Nosler and Hornady and had patches of very poor results with them. It is my opinion that Berger and Sierra make the best bullets for match shooting. For the overall cost of shooting, I don't think it is worth the agony to cheap out on bullets.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-01-2019, 03:54 AM
rcolarco rcolarco is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Maryland
Posts: 4,596
Send a message via AIM to rcolarco
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WindLogik View Post
I have shot a lot of the following bullets

Sierra: 77, 69, 80, 155
Berger: 80.5, 105, 155.5

These are the bullets I shoot for matches, they are all HPBT. I have shot thousands and thousands of these bullets in matches and not had a problem. I have tried the equivalents to these by Nosler and Hornady and had patches of very poor results with them. It is my opinion that Berger and Sierra make the best bullets for match shooting. For the overall cost of shooting, I don't think it is worth the agony to cheap out on bullets.
You really can't go wrong with any of those for consistency over time.
__________________
NRA-certified rifle (40 years), pistol, home firearms safety, and personal protection instructor
NRA-certified range safety officer
North Dakota and Maryland certified hunter safety instructor
ACEP-certified coach
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-01-2019, 09:50 AM
la Fiere la Fiere is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Northern California - SF peninsula
Posts: 1,905
Default

For target use I generally favor Sierra bullets, but that's mostly because I've had good results with them and am not curious enough to try something new. I know many shooters who very successfully use Bergers, they have an excellent reputation as well.



In particular I like the 168 SMK's in my M1 Garand, (acknowledging that Garand bullet selection is another topic altogether), and the 220 SMK's in my .300 Win Mag.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-01-2019, 01:38 PM
M829A3 M829A3 is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 13
Default I'm thinkg of getting one of the Rem 700s

with 26 in heavy barrel in 30.06. Not looking to go comp shooting, but extend my range a bit. Most eveything in 223, 308 , 30.05 and 300 WM, must be pretty sorted out by now, so I figured there must be some consensus. And yes, I know every tube shoots differently. ( Last time I competed in any shooting qual/comp was with the M256A1 120 mm tank gun, which really stretches the range out a bit. Some tubes could do clover leafs at 1800, others barely target form at the same range.) So I just figure, I shouldn't have to start from a complete unknown.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:55 AM.