Go Back   CMP Forums > CMP Competitions > Leg Matches
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 10-24-2011, 11:25 PM
Craftsman Craftsman is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Florida
Posts: 7,002
Default

Have you shot at 500-600 yrds before? You only mention shooting 100-200 yrds. I'm all for "just go out and do it", but, I would suggest shooting 500-600, first, if you havn't. Get comfortable shooting at a 1/4 mile, before going to over 1/2 a mile away. At the 600 yrd range I belong to, anyone can shoot our 600 yrd matches, but, if you don't have a good zero, and are not "rounds on target/paper", in a very few shots, you can not continue to fire misses. And as others said, use at least good match ammo, rather than surplus ball, in a 1,000 yard match.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 10-25-2011, 12:04 AM
ANDYZ28 ANDYZ28 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Midlothian, VA
Posts: 763
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Craftsman View Post
Have you shot at 500-600 yrds before? You only mention shooting 100-200 yrds. I'm all for "just go out and do it", but, I would suggest shooting 500-600, first, if you havn't. Get comfortable shooting at a 1/4 mile, before going to over 1/2 a mile away. At the 600 yrd range I belong to, anyone can shoot our 600 yrd matches, but, if you don't have a good zero, and are not "rounds on target/paper", in a very few shots, you can not continue to fire misses. And as others said, use at least good match ammo, rather than surplus ball, in a 1,000 yard match.
That is what I plan to do; http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=57112
__________________
http://andyz28.com/supportm1forvets.html
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 10-25-2011, 12:43 AM
Hawky Hawky is offline
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Arizona
Posts: 1,219
Default

From www.fredsm14stocks.com:

Zero'd at 100 to get to 200 come up 3 clicks.
200-300 3
300-400 4
400-500 4
500-600 5
600-700 5
700-800 6
800-900 8
900-1000 8
__________________
˙ǝuılƃıs ʎɯ uı ʇnd oʇ ɹǝʌǝlɔ ƃuıɥʇʎuɐ ɟo ʞuıɥʇ ʇ,uɐɔ I
��

Feedback:
http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=131198

Last edited by Hawky; 10-25-2011 at 12:46 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 10-25-2011, 06:05 AM
ceresco ceresco is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 7,254
Default

A simple answer to your question is: the elevation drum of your M1...just set it up properly and use the numbers on it. For another, and possibly better prep, there is a special target called the "Sighting target for .30cal M1 Rifle.. using M72 Match Ammunition etc. from National Target Co. This target is fired at 50yds and has calibrated marking to allow zeros to 1000yds. Essentially you hold at the bottom of a 2" black and adjust until you are hitting 20.5" above the bottom of the black. I have used this target and never failed to put the first shot into the target at 1000yds with 308win and 30-06 generic 1000yd loads. Wind will be a big factor--but not for elevation. Good Shooting.....
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 10-25-2011, 06:40 AM
maxim maxim is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Mi
Posts: 53
Default

http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=51440

Not with a Garand but a Springfield 1903A4 clone. I had to be about 38" high at 100 to be on paper at 1000. Depends on the size of the number boards and quality of your vision if you can see them. The loads were carefully assembled handloads at the limit of what I would subject a 67 year old rifle to. The holds must be precise and the Garand sights are large. Not say say it can not be done, just you will have your hands full. Then there is the wind.....ahhh the wind....with 2 seconds of flight time.
This summer I shot my Garand XTC 200, 300, 600 and did a fair showing at 600. But as they say that extra 400 yards will get you.

The comments about the bullet going sub-sonic has merit as they become unstable and wonder. When they fall short they give the guys in the pits a sand bath.

Last edited by maxim; 10-25-2011 at 03:08 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 10-25-2011, 09:33 AM
ronintank ronintank is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Northern Michigan
Posts: 306
Default

I shot the 1000 yard long range match at camp grayling michigan a few years back with a M-1 Garand i loaded up 180g smk i dont have the powder measure but the powder was 4064 and was above recomended max load in the seirra manual. pick your load and work it up looking for signs of over pressure.
when i finished the match i was 43 clicks elev from 100 yard zero and 12 clicks to the right windage.
The guys in the pits kept calling back that some of the rounds were subsonic.
__________________
Tim Schmidt
Gaylord Michigan
Northland Sportsmen's Club Minion
M-1 For Vets Match Director
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 10-25-2011, 09:50 AM
ronintank ronintank is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Northern Michigan
Posts: 306
Default

i checked back and i shot 429-3x out of 600 at the 1000 yard match.
I think i could do much better now as i have fine tuned my rifles stock fit and rebarreled it.
Maybe this spring i will give it another try.
__________________
Tim Schmidt
Gaylord Michigan
Northland Sportsmen's Club Minion
M-1 For Vets Match Director
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 10-25-2011, 12:14 PM
ANDYZ28 ANDYZ28 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Midlothian, VA
Posts: 763
Default

I do so hope you can make it to the Quantico shoot.

I would advise against attempting to shoot your 1903A3 at 1,000 yards. The rifle does not have sufficient available elevation for that distance.

Concerning the mathematics of your M1 sights;
1) 0.004" represents 1 MOA

2) Once you develop a good steady prone position at 300 yards (or even 200), you will want to duplicate the exact same position at 1,000 yards. This can only be accomplished by reducing the height of the front sight by the required amount.

3) Here is how we arrive at that figure; I have a very large "thermometer target" (TT) that I have had for nearly 20 years. This is a special type of target used only to zero a rifle @ 100 yards for 1,000 yards. Here is how it works. The target is placed on a cardboard backer at 100 yards. Attach a MR31 target to the square outlined area at the bottom. Their is a vertical line marked in inches extending from the center of this square up to 40" with small multi-colored circles at various points along this line. Each circle represents a different bullet/caliber/range combination. It will allow a rifle to be "hot zeroed" at 200, 300, 600, 800, 900, and 1,000 yards. In the old days when I was shooting a .30-.338 Mag w/190 grain Sierras match King bullets at 1,000 I would simply do the easier method, and save my now valuable target. I would look at my "TT" and see that at 100 yards I want my bullet to impact exactly 39" above my point of aim, and I am in the aiming black at 1,000 yards. The same will hold true for your M1. If you come up 39 clicks (minutes) from your 100 yard zero you will be on the paper, or close enough to be adjusted onto the target by an experienced assistant observing your fire. The "TT" does not even contain a calculated impact point for 168 grain bullets, it stops at 600 yards. Add 6 clicks to your 100 yard zero and consider that you "prone zero" for the time being. That leaves us with 39 minus 6 = 33 minutes. You will want the exact same head position in relation to the rear sight at 1,000 yards as you would at 300 yards. 0.004" times 33 minutes= 0.132" to be removed from the top of the front sight to maintain the same head position. But an M1 front sight does not contain enough front sight material to remove 0.132". If you recall from my post 0,090 needs to be removed, since that is very nearly all you can remove and maintain the same clear rear edge of the sight. 0.132 minus 0.090= 0.042, 0.042 divided by 0.004= 10.5 minutes. These 10.5 (11) minutes added to your calculated 300 yard zero will be the same exact amount you would require to shoot at 600 yards with the standard height front sight. Perfect for our purposes, you will be using the exact same prone position at 1,000 yards as you would at 600 yards. A modified National Match front sight 0.062" width would be even better.

4) Installing the modified front sight while maintaining your no-wind zero; measure the width of both front sights using the same dial vernier we all use and divide each one individually by 2, to find the center. Use the vernier to measure from the front sight base to the edge of the sight, and record this dimension. remove the front sight, now install the modified sight and repeat the process to "center" the front sight in the same location as the previous front sight. For example; My front sight measures 0.492", divided by 2 = 0.246" from the right edge of my front sight base I measured 0.042". I have measured the width of my modified front sight at 0.486" divided by 2 = 0.243", 0.246" minus 0.243= 0.006". Add this 0.006" to the measurement we previously recorded 0.042 from the right side of the rear sight base to the right edge of the front sight and we have 0.048", tighten the front sight and you are done, GO AND SHOOT IT!
__________________
http://andyz28.com/supportm1forvets.html
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 11-02-2011, 09:00 PM
P. Greaney P. Greaney is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Southern Indiana
Posts: 37
Default

I am relatively certain that on the standard rear sight on both the M1 and M14 one click of either the windage or elevation moves the sight .008" which results in one minute of angle change.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 11-02-2011, 10:30 PM
ANDYZ28 ANDYZ28 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Midlothian, VA
Posts: 763
Default

I probably am mistaken about the .004 part. I appologize, I know you are correct. I should have caught that.
__________________
http://andyz28.com/supportm1forvets.html
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:20 AM.