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  #1  
Old 07-29-2017, 05:01 PM
Striker Striker is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: New Haven, Michigan
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Default How to Video: M1 Garand Barrel

I made this video since there was only one video available online that featured the steps involved with barreling an M1. This video does not show every action performed, however it is a breakdown of how simple it truly is to barrel these rifles with a few tools and a bit of time!

This video was uploaded and edited by me, so any questions can be directed here or on the videos comment section. Note the disclaimer's in the description and enjoy!

https://youtu.be/45uOZVzrErE
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  #2  
Old 07-29-2017, 06:07 PM
Kansas Poster Kansas Poster is offline
 
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This is a great Vid. Thanks.
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  #3  
Old 07-30-2017, 06:28 PM
lapriester lapriester is offline
 
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Location: Cobb, N California
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Really great video. I wish I had that kind of video making ability. I'm just a PDF and Powerpoint guy myself.

The only two things I would definately do differently would be to put your cutting oil in a small pan and dip the reamer and use one of those nice brushes to swab cutting oil into the chamber before ever putting the dripping wet reamer into it. Too much is never enough. It might be more messy but just dribbling some oil on the reamer and then reaming a dry chamber isn't how I do it or how my instructions suggest doing it. Sorry, I didn't watch all the way through but did you remove the reamer about halfway done, thoroughly clean it and the chamber and go back in to finish (after re oiling of course)? I usually do that at least twice and more if the job takes quite a few turns to finish. That's a critical step to make sure reaming debris is causing damage or giving you a false non closing of the bolt which could cause you to ream too much.
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Old 07-31-2017, 10:42 AM
Striker Striker is offline
 
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Larry, I do mention in the video a few times to remove the reamer and clean it completely, I've seen other videos a while back where they just reamed the whole thing in one shot, and that always made me nervous, so I stressed it here.

But, in the video which I know is hard to see, the reamer is actually getting a coating of oil to where oil is dripping off of it, as I also remember reading your instructions years ago, but I failed to re-consult them when I made the video. Good point to note, and store in the memory banks!
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Old 08-21-2018, 08:45 AM
skwchock skwchock is offline
 
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Thanks!!!
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  #6  
Old 09-12-2018, 01:51 PM
sparx sparx is online now
 
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Location: Tucson, Arizona
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I mop cutting oil in the chamber before I ream, more lube the better.
Also I clean the chamber and bore with brake cleaner between reams, then swab it out. I would bet I do it at least 5 times for each barrel chamber reamed.

sparx
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  #7  
Old 09-12-2018, 06:29 PM
lapriester lapriester is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sparx View Post
I mop cutting oil in the chamber before I ream, more lube the better.
Also I clean the chamber and bore with brake cleaner between reams, then swab it out. I would bet I do it at least 5 times for each barrel chamber reamed.

sparx
This! Maybe not 5 times but at least 3. I use enough cutting fluid I soak a rag under the work pretty well. Makes a mess nevertheless.
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  #8  
Old 11-04-2018, 11:17 AM
canes7 canes7 is offline
 
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Location: Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sparx View Post
I mop cutting oil in the chamber before I ream, more lube the better.
Also I clean the chamber and bore with brake cleaner between reams, then swab it out. I would bet I do it at least 5 times for each barrel chamber reamed.

sparx
Iíll blow out the chambered reamer with compressed air a few times during the process. Iíll also drown the reamer in cutting oil during the process. Iíve really not found a way to do this without making a mess, using any method.
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Old 11-10-2018, 07:31 AM
M14 M14 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canes7 View Post
Iíll blow out the chambered reamer with compressed air a few times during the process. Iíll also drown the reamer in cutting oil during the process. Iíve really not found a way to do this without making a mess, using any method.
I have, years ago. It's really simple. So simple in fact, that most people over think it. The metal cut out of the chamber is particulate matter. Particulate matter has a tendency to cling to itself, such as a ball of mercury when smashed.... or water droplets grouping together on your windshield when it rains.

Before inserting your reamer, use a fingertip, carefully, lest you slice your finger, and coat the knife edges with plastilube, all six of them. Insert the reamer and attach the pull through rod and any interchangeable pilots.

When it is almost ready to bottom out in the chamber, give it a small squirt of thin oil like REM oil. Cut the chamber. When you extract the reamer, most of the cuttings will still be on it. Those that aren't after pushing an oil patch through from the front, will be when you insert your "small magnet" into the chamber. Simple, no mess, no fuss, and a mirror finish chamber.

You don't need thick cutting oil because the plastilube is heavily viscose and the thin oil spurt you put in there will dilute it just enough to leave it some grabbing power for the particles you cut out. It only takes seconds to do a chamber this way. Don't feel bad though, it took me a few barrels to realize the metal cuttings were magnetic and easily dealt with. Ha.
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