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  #191  
Old 05-21-2014, 04:12 PM
Jay Stickles Jay Stickles is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Northeastern Illinois
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Originally Posted by Jay Stickles View Post
Here's an old timer, not sure what it is, but pictured with a Garand for scale. I think it was an early flintlock shotgun that Ye Old Bubba got a hold of and converted to a percussion cap long ago.








Early stock repair/modification:



Really large bore, barrel seems too thin for a musket:

I did a little Google research on flintlock to percussion cap conversions and found that they were very common after the percussion cap system was introduced. Interestingly, most of the examples appear in North America. The theory is that only the well to do had firearms in Europe and they were likely to just shelve the flintlocks and buy new percussion cap guns.

Anyway, the easy way to tell if the rifle/pistol is a conversion is the "lock plate". Flintlock plates had to be fairly long to hang all the bits and pieces for the flint lock mechanism.



So a long plate with some empty tapped screw holes on a percussion cap rifle/pistol would indicate a conversion.

Here's an example showing a flintlock and a converted flintlock (a little more well done than the one I posted- no gap between the nipple/bolster and lock plate.

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  #192  
Old 06-01-2014, 03:56 AM
Smal Smal is offline
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Location: Cocoa,Florida
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Originally Posted by Ohio Don View Post
Interesting that there is a ribbon in the picture that doesn't date to WW II. Did he serve in the Korean War also? NDS medal/ribbon weren't issued until Ike was President. Dad's had a bronze star as he was in during both Korea and Vietnam timeframes.
Don he Very well may have,I have all His Paperwork here also,I know it does say He was in one Branch and then was moved to another of the Services in WW-2,and i know he was in After WW-2 also so he may have hung around for Korea,All this was found wrapped up in a Hankie,so i have kept it just like he had it for many years,He is gone now so kinda hard to ask him..I have seen the ones with the star before also.
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  #193  
Old 06-01-2014, 09:46 AM
bigbird bigbird is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Savannah, Georgia
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My most prized weapon is my 1819 Simon North, US Flintlock pistol, dated 1921.

http://s11.postimage.org/54y8070sj/DSCN3272.jpg

I also have a 1915 DWM P-08 German Luger.

Jim

Last edited by bigbird; 06-04-2014 at 07:29 PM.
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  #194  
Old 06-01-2014, 03:12 PM
KRAG-30-40 KRAG-30-40 is offline
 
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Location: Paris,Illinoios
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Here's one not often seen,the Colt M1903 Pocket Hammer in .38ACP-

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  #195  
Old 06-03-2014, 08:56 PM
Milsurp Collector Milsurp Collector is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
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Default The M1911's grandfather: the Colt 1902 Military



Designed by John Browning, the Colt 1902 Military was an evolution of the Colt 1900, one of John Browning's first semi-automatic pistol designs, and his first semi-auto pistol designed for Colt. The Colt 1900 is very similar to the Colt 1902 Sporting pistol shown below. All are chambered for the .38 ACP cartridge.



The War Department tested the Colt 1900 against the Mauser C96 "Broomhandle" and the Steyr Mannlicher 1894 and found it to be the most reliable of the three pistols.

After field trials of the Colt 1900 - primarily by the cavalry - suggestions were made to Colt for changes to be made, resulting in the 1902 Military.




The magazine capacity was increased from 7 to 8 - resulting in a longer grip



- and a lanyard swivel and slide stop were added.





200 were purchased for field trials and 800 were ordered by the Mexican government, but the majority of the 18,000 produced from 1902 to 1928 were sold commercially.

Colt 1902 Sporting and two 1902 Military pistols.
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  #196  
Old 06-04-2014, 06:36 AM
AWOhio AWOhio is offline
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Columbus OH
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How long is that barrel on the M1902? It goes on forever.

That is something to show a 1911 guy complaining about glocks. "Oh yeah, well your 1911 is just a rip off of the 1902".
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  #197  
Old 06-04-2014, 11:41 AM
abuck50 abuck50 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: NW Ohio
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Might not be that unusual, but here is a pic of my 1903 32acp
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  #198  
Old 09-14-2014, 07:30 PM
Milsurp Collector Milsurp Collector is offline
 
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Default The Forgotten Ally

Many people who collect surplus military rifles start out with a theme of "one rifle from each of the World War II powers." They have an American M1 Garand Rifle, a British Lee Enfield No. 4, a Soviet Mosin Nagant 91/30, a German K98k, and a Japanese Arisaka. Some might even have an Italian Carcano and a French MAS-36. But one country that played an important role in World War II is often overlooked.





Like many other developing countries in the early 20th century, China favored Mauser rifles. China purchased large numbers of Mauser Standard Modell rifles for their fight against Japan, but the supply couldn't keep up with the demand, especially after the alliance of Germany and Japan ended shipments of German rifles to Japan's enemy China. So the Chinese began making copies of the Mauser Standard Modell. Some early copies even had fake Mauser and gibberish German markings.

The Chinese Type 24 or Zhong (中) Zheng (正) Shi (式) (Chiang Kai Shek) Rifle was the standard rifle of China in World War II, chambered in 7.92x57mm Mauser and was an obvious copy of the Mauser Standard Modell. They are not common in the US and are usually in worn-out condition when found. This one was probably refurbished, is in good condition for one of these, and it is matching except for the bolt.





The quality of the machining and fit is crude compared to German rifles.




This marking indicates it is a Zhong (中) Zheng (正) Shi (式) rifle made at the 1st Arsenal at Hanyang in December 1942.

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