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  #1  
Old 04-20-2019, 09:10 AM
Freedom Freedom is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Maine
Posts: 455
Default Anyone collect paper shot shells? I have questions.

Over many years of accumulating paper shotgun shells, I have quite a number of most gauges and brands. Most of the shells I bought new, back in there day, and some passed on to me by family and friends. Is there a value to these old shells, or are they just old stuff ?
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  #2  
Old 04-20-2019, 10:24 AM
packrat2 packrat2 is online now
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Utah
Posts: 135
Default old shot shells

I collect old shot shell boxes, full ones and single shells also. Mostly I find them at gun shows, yes there is a value there, try and find and buy a full old box of Winchester, Peters or Remington there not cheap...
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  #3  
Old 04-20-2019, 01:47 PM
BobJ50 BobJ50 is offline
 
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Location: Georgia
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Don't let your mom or your wife throw anything away!
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  #4  
Old 04-21-2019, 02:13 PM
silverplate silverplate is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Dry Ridge, KY
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The "U.S. Property" marked boxes from WWII are very desirable as well, both 25 round and 10 round.
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  #5  
Old 04-24-2019, 06:59 AM
navyrifleman navyrifleman is online now
 
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Looking at, and handling old shotshells is fun, and interesting.

Outside dimensions are the same as modern shells, but inside they are completely different animals.

Remington shells used to have their own size primer which was smaller than Winchester or Federal. The inside taper and base heights were different than today. The base was brass back in the day, but plated steel today, and of course all today are plastic bodies, some unibody and others with separate base sections.

Wads were of fiber and cardboard and few had shot collars. Those wads were set at a certain pressure when loaded. Today the whole wad and collar section is usually plastic and of one piece construction.

I recently got some paper federal 12 gauge shells in a lot of mixed shells for reloading. Looking at them brought back memories of when I first started hunting - back when paper shells were the norm and only Remington had started to make their green plastic hulls (and Winchester made their target AA's).

With paper hulls, you had to be careful to not let them get wet, or they would swell and not chamber in the gun.
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  #6  
Old 04-24-2019, 07:52 AM
JimF JimF is offline
 
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Ahhh yes . . . . .the old paper shells!
Back there, in the 50’s, when the local gun club would have their annual “field day”, as soon as the rounds of trap or skeet would end, I and other boys would race up to the various stations, scoop up the still smoking, paper shells, and SNIFF the fresh aroma of that old powder!
Best smell ever! . . . .
Anyone else remember?
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  #7  
Old 04-24-2019, 10:00 AM
packrat2 packrat2 is online now
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Utah
Posts: 135
Default Anyone else remember?

Yes I remember the smell of paper shells..Federal makes a batch of paper trap shells once a year or so, I have a bunch {hulls}a trap shooter gave me.
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  #8  
Old 04-24-2019, 10:12 AM
edlmann edlmann is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by navyrifleman View Post
With paper hulls, you had to be careful to not let them get wet, or they would swell and not chamber in the gun.
My Dad bought a mixed case of #6 and #7-1/2 12 gauge paper shells at Montgomery Wards (Hawthorne brand but probably Federal) in the early '60s, but after a year in the utility room, they wouldn't chamber in his auto or pump. He ended up buying a cheap Stevens 311 to shoot them up.
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  #9  
Old 04-24-2019, 10:40 AM
X Hunter X Hunter is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edlmann View Post
My Dad bought a mixed case of #6 and #7-1/2 12 gauge paper shells at Montgomery Wards (Hawthorne brand but probably Federal) in the early '60s, but after a year in the utility room, they wouldn't chamber in his auto or pump. He ended up buying a cheap Stevens 311 to shoot them up.
Back in the day, shot shells were hung in a canvas bag over the heater in the duck blind to keep them fro swelling up.
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  #10  
Old 04-25-2019, 06:57 PM
sigman2 sigman2 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: North Alabama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimF View Post
Ahhh yes . . . . .the old paper shells!
Back there, in the 50’s, when the local gun club would have their annual “field day”, as soon as the rounds of trap or skeet would end, I and other boys would race up to the various stations, scoop up the still smoking, paper shells, and SNIFF the fresh aroma of that old powder!
Best smell ever! . . . .
Anyone else remember?
Oh yes, I was a fired shell sniffer! What a wonderful smell.

Quote:
Originally Posted by navyrifleman View Post
Looking at, and handling old shotshells is fun, and interesting.

Outside dimensions are the same as modern shells, but inside they are completely different animals.

Remington shells used to have their own size primer which was smaller than Winchester or Federal. The inside taper and base heights were different than today. The base was brass back in the day, but plated steel today, and of course all today are plastic bodies, some unibody and others with separate base sections.

Wads were of fiber and cardboard and few had shot collars. Those wads were set at a certain pressure when loaded. Today the whole wad and collar section is usually plastic and of one piece construction.

I recently got some paper federal 12 gauge shells in a lot of mixed shells for reloading. Looking at them brought back memories of when I first started hunting - back when paper shells were the norm and only Remington had started to make their green plastic hulls (and Winchester made their target AA's).

With paper hulls, you had to be careful to not let them get wet, or they would swell and not chamber in the gun.

I still have a number of boxes of old Super X Mark 5 shells in #6 and 7 1/2. I used to buy cases of them before the waterfowl steel shot laws. The #6 were great for ducks over decoys and 7 1/2 for teal.

I also have two boxes of Remington Express 20 Ga. shells in 7 1/2 and one box of #9 in the "new" plastic cases. They are green, having been made before the color coding of 20 Ga. shells. These were from my quail hunting days

I collect anything old and have about a hundred loose paper shells and a few full boxes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by X Hunter View Post
Back in the day, shot shells were hung in a canvas bag over the heater in the duck blind to keep them fro swelling up.
I never had the luxury of a heater in a duck blind.
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Last edited by Big_Red; 04-27-2019 at 01:44 AM. Reason: Merge consecutive posts
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