Go Back   CMP Forums > CMP Sales > Ammunition
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-10-2009, 07:21 PM
brandy12 brandy12 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: San Jose, Ca
Posts: 247
Default Anyone reduce the powder load for military brass?

Reading the NRA specs for reloading the Garand and they say to reduce the load by 1.5 grains for military brass. Does anyone do that or is it fine to reload it like any other brass?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-10-2009, 07:33 PM
Ballbags (Again) Ballbags (Again) is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Illinois 20 min East of St Louis
Posts: 873
Default

This Subject has been Beat to Death
I for 1 do not.If it is thicker as some say, then it should be heavier and on my scales I can only see a Minute Difference
Others will chime in I am sure
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-10-2009, 07:43 PM
plattincreek plattincreek is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Just south of St. Louis, Mo.
Posts: 253
Default

I don't reduce for military brass either and my chronograph doesn't show any big swings in velocity that might indicate a pressure problem.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-10-2009, 07:57 PM
J.R.2009 J.R.2009 is online now
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Mt. Pleasant, SC
Posts: 8,249
Default

ch-chime ! I haven't reloaded for a good number of years (in the 60's and 70's) , but when I did all the manuals recommended that the loads be cut by 10% at near max and work up slowly when using mil brass. The brass is thicker, as all know, and because of the extra thickness the case volume is reduced. I cc'ed many a case and got at LEAST a 10% difference in the amount of water I could get in in the mil brass and commercial brass.

Just my .02 worth, for what it's worth. I'm sure things have changed somewhat since I reloaded all those years ago.
J.R.
__________________
J.R.

Home of the FREE Carbine Club Newsletter Index raeed4@comcast.net
I do NOT have newsletters to sell! ONLY our INDEX of what is in each issue. To get the issues see the link for the Carbine collectors Club.
http://www.uscarbinecal30.com/

USAF 379th Bomb Wing (Heavy) SAC
Gun Owners of SC
GCA
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-10-2009, 09:49 PM
USSR USSR is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Burdett, NY
Posts: 2,040
Default

For 7.62x51/.308, yes, as there is usually a BIG difference in case weight and capacity (especially light brass like Winchester and Hornady Match). .30-06, no, as there is very little difference weight and capacity-wise. Lake City M72 and Lapua brass are basically the same weight, and using the same load generate the same velocity/pressure.

Don
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-10-2009, 10:27 PM
ceresco ceresco is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 7,605
Default

Of course all the manuals recommended that--they copied from each other and the parroting has gone on ever since. The proper warning is something like this: "cartridge cases vary in weight and internal volume. When loading near maximum pressures make sure your cases are uniform and do not assume other cases are the same." The idea that "military" cases are all the same (and heavier) is just as ridiculous as assuming that all commercial cases are. The LC and HXP 30-06 "miltary" cases are in the same weight range as Federal and Remington cases and since M2 loads are far from maximum, it doesn't matter anyway. Really significant weight differences are found in .303British commercial cases, for example, and of course there is no reason to believe any manifacturer keeps the case weight uniform from year to year. Anyone with a scale can prove all this for themself.. The 5.56 and 7.62 NATO cases are sometimes heavier and here the load levels are high enough to make some caution advisable. Good Shooting........
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-11-2009, 07:44 AM
epm729 epm729 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Highland, New York
Posts: 2,123
Default

I just recently started loading for my M1, though I've been reloading for years. For the sake of safety I followed whats in the Loading Data, if it says to reduce the powder load by 2.0 grains for military brass and work up the load that is what I do. That is not to say others are wrong, they have better experience, but if I'm the one putting my face behind the receiver or more so my sons , I want to be sure I've taken every precaution.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-11-2009, 12:25 PM
rcolarco rcolarco is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Maryland
Posts: 4,586
Send a message via AIM to rcolarco
Default

As usual, ceresco makes much sense. Military dup loads are safe in military cases. I do reduce loads somewhat, because the reduced loads produce better accuracy and kick less.

I would not rely on a chronograph for any indication of high pressure. Hatcher's notebook describes destruction loads that produced very consistent velocities as they blew up the rifles.
__________________
NRA-certified rifle (40 years), pistol, home firearms safety, and personal protection instructor
NRA-certified range safety officer
North Dakota and Maryland certified hunter safety instructor
ACEP-certified coach
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-11-2009, 02:42 PM
demjones demjones is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Middletown, RI
Posts: 147
Default

Once again, I've learned something from lurking around here.

Thanks everybody!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-12-2009, 10:23 AM
plattincreek plattincreek is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Just south of St. Louis, Mo.
Posts: 253
Default

Another thought on this subject, you might want to brush up on how to "read" pressure signs by examining fired primers (examples in many reloading manuals); pressure signs with sticky extraction; and there is a good "how to" judge pressure by measuring case expansion with a micrometer article by Ken Waters in his Pet Loads book. I agree with rcolarco's comment above that relying only on a chronograph can be misleading. As long as you stay within the relatively limited published loads for the Garand, I don't think you will have problems with either commercial or military cases (accuracy might be a different subject though). Bolt guns can be a different story as there can be a tendency to creep towards finding that upper limit as you work up loads.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:20 AM.