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  #31  
Old 04-08-2016, 10:36 PM
BryanJ BryanJ is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Tallahassee, FL
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Default Mechanical Aptitude & Common Sense

Or lack thereof...Someone very close to me has a PhD in Applied Mathematics and will soon be taking a job at the Naval War Office doing design work on submarines, truly brilliant. One day I was driving his car, hit the brakes resulting in a horrible metallic grinding noise, and almost no brakes, at all. So, after immediately taking the car to the nearest shop, I asked the young man in question, that when he hit the brakes and nothing happened and he heard this horrible noise, what was he thinking. His reply was that he just thought he was dragging his muffler. I replied, OK then, well, let's talk about that...Just have to chuckle...But in all fairness to this young man, if you needed to do the math to get the space shuttle to the moon, he'd be your guy.
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  #32  
Old 04-09-2016, 10:01 AM
Patriot76 Patriot76 is offline
 
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Location: Marion, VA
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All great points.....reminds me of one of Secretary Rumsfeld's pearls -
"we don't know what we don't know".
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  #33  
Old 04-10-2016, 10:07 AM
Dingsbums Dingsbums is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Texas
Posts: 312
Default Carbine failure and repair.

Quote:
Originally Posted by abtex1 View Post
First thing I check on an M1 Carbine is headspace with my gages- critical to have the correct headspace so the bolt closes fully. I disassemble, clean, annotate parts on a data sheet, lubricate and reassemble.
I recently took my carbine to the range because it had sat in my safe too long. Fired 1 15 round mag, no problems. I fired another, but on the 15th round I got a stovepipe. That's when I noticed the right bolt lug had snapped off. Sooooo, a visit to Numrich for a replacement bolt, extractor spring and extractor spring plunger, and a visit to Brownell's for a No-Go gauge. $160 later it's back together, but now I'm afraid to shoot it again for fear of something else falling apart. The new bolt wouldn't close on the no-go gauge, as it's not supposed to. Somebody tell me to shoot it again.
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  #34  
Old 04-10-2016, 10:49 AM
meplat meplat is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Prescott, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dingsbums View Post
The new bolt wouldn't close on the no-go gauge, as it's not supposed to. Somebody tell me to shoot it again.
Ahhh ... but does it close on a GO?



Seriously, before shooting it again, I would clean out your chamber and inspect your rifle carefully. Once a rifle breaks a bolt like this, breakage tends to recur

http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=64617

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  #35  
Old 04-17-2016, 09:32 AM
microwaveguy microwaveguy is offline
 
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Location: South SF Bay Area
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I am going to add my one and a half cents to this thread and relate my own actual experience on M1 carbines that I have acquired.

I got a Rockola a couple of years ago and did the usual cleaning and head space check. It would NOT close on a go gauge. So there are those that believe that a go gauge is not needed in your tool kit, and this was an actual example where I wouldn't want to shoot that rifle in the condition that I received it.

Then just last weekend I managed to acquire a Standard Products to add to my herd and when looking at the bolt, the extractor plunger was installed upside down.

These rifles that we love have been around for 70+ years and built under wartime conditions. They have passed through an unknown number of hands before reaching us and we need to take a few minutes to see what we hold in our hands
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  #36  
Old 04-17-2016, 12:47 PM
Jlag Jlag is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Covington, LA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by microwaveguy View Post
I am going to add my one and a half cents to this thread and relate my own actual experience on M1 carbines that I have acquired.

I got a Rockola a couple of years ago and did the usual cleaning and head space check. It would NOT close on a go gauge. So there are those that believe that a go gauge is not needed in your tool kit, and this was an actual example where I wouldn't want to shoot that rifle in the condition that I received it.

Then just last weekend I managed to acquire a Standard Products to add to my herd and when looking at the bolt, the extractor plunger was installed upside down.

These rifles that we love have been around for 70+ years and built under wartime conditions. They have passed through an unknown number of hands before reaching us and we need to take a few minutes to see what we hold in our hands
You bring up a great point about safety, Microwaveguy. As much as I love to buy most accessories available for my guns (US, Swiss Russian, Finn), I have not bought the go/no go gauges. While the gauges can be a bit pricey, I believe that one's own safety should be the priority. We probably put to much blind faith into the LGS or wherever we bought the rifle from, when the truth is that they probably didn't care about the headspace because they are selling the rifle - not shooting it. Thanks for the reminder!
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  #37  
Old 04-21-2016, 09:27 PM
Dingsbums Dingsbums is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Texas
Posts: 312
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meplat View Post
Ahhh ... but does it close on a GO?



Seriously, before shooting it again, I would clean out your chamber and inspect your rifle carefully. Once a rifle breaks a bolt like this, breakage tends to recur

http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=64617

No, I didn't check it with a GO gauge, I wasn't too concerned that it had the minimum headspace, just wanted to make sure it didn't have too much. I did clean the chamber and bolt till it was clean and dry as a bone. It wouldn't close on the NO-GO, so I went ahead and reassembled the bolt (with all the annoying tiny parts) took it out to the farm, uh firing range, and it functioned flawlessly. Well, except for that one friggin' magazine that liked to double feed on me.
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  #38  
Old 04-28-2016, 03:47 PM
wgalvinized wgalvinized is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 48
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Since the topic is GO / NO GO gauges, I have a Inland dated 9-44 barrel, receiver s/n dates between 9-43 and 1-44.

I have not fired her yet. The ME is 2. I do not have a TE gauge. With GO gauge the bolt closes nicely. With the NO GO Gauge the bolt does not snap fully shut BUT it will close if I give it some motivation. When I use appropriate NO GO Gauges on other caliber guns the NO GO gauge will not allow me to close the bolt at all.

I am thinking I should buy a .30Carbine FIELD gauge before I fire this Inland.

Any thoughts or share your experiences?
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  #39  
Old 04-28-2016, 04:38 PM
meplat meplat is offline
 
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Location: Prescott, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wgalvinized
With GO gauge the bolt closes nicely. With the NO GO Gauge the bolt does not snap fully shut BUT it will close if I give it some motivation.
First, never, and I mean NEVER, let the bolt "snap shut" on a headspace gage!



Stick a piece of scotch tape on the end of your NOGO gage. You can measure its length with calipers if you have same. It's probably a couple thou over the NOGO length. Try that.

Sounds like it probably won't close (unless you let the bolt snap shut!) and you could save the cost of a FIELD gage.

If your chamber is "too long", the only harm with shooting the carbine will probably be a failure to fire as some of the firing pin's energy is diverted in moving the cartridge forward and so unavailable to detonate the primer.

Unlike short headspace, long headspace in a carbine is a reliability issue, not a safety issue.


Last edited by meplat; 04-28-2016 at 04:40 PM.
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  #40  
Old 04-28-2016, 07:52 PM
wgalvinized wgalvinized is offline
 
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Aha. Beauty. This is why I love this forum. Thank you. As a result of doing it the right way I have no problems. Thank you.
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