Go Back   CMP Forums > CMP Sales > CMP Bolt Action Rifles
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 06-30-2018, 08:41 PM
Griff557 Griff557 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Grand Rapids MN
Posts: 219
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 98Charlie View Post
I would suggest having the receiver inspected for cracks. There have been some cracks observed, usually when a guy was sporterizing the rifle, and had the receiver polished and blued. The majority of cracks observed were Eddystone receivers that had been re-barreled. Not to say Eddystone receivers are bad, as all 3 makes have had tiny hairline cracks, but Eddystone was the largest producer, so one would expect that, per centage wise. I have never heard of one of these rifles breaking or blowing up though, and cracked receivers aren't all that common. It is just something to look out for.
https://imgur.com/a/89Ys3zl

I bought a 1917 Eddystone that had a HS barrel a year ago that upon further inspection had a cracked receiver. Luckily the seller exchanged the rifle for a WRA 1917 with original barrel
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-02-2018, 05:02 AM
98Charlie 98Charlie is online now
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: WI
Posts: 360
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Griff557 View Post
https://imgur.com/a/89Ys3zl

I bought a 1917 Eddystone that had a HS barrel a year ago that upon further inspection had a cracked receiver. Luckily the seller exchanged the rifle for a WRA 1917 with original barrel
Thanks for this post and pic. This is the first I have seen of a cracked M1917 receiver.
The rear of the receiver ring is where the bolt locking lugs engage, so I wonder how safe it would be to shoot with that hairline crack?
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-02-2018, 05:22 AM
Griff557 Griff557 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Grand Rapids MN
Posts: 219
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 98Charlie View Post
Thanks for this post and pic. This is the first I have seen of a cracked M1917 receiver.
The rear of the receiver ring is where the bolt locking lugs engage, so I wonder how safe it would be to shoot with that hairline crack?
The crack continued down the front of the receiver to where the barrel was threaded in. I had read about rebarreled Eddystones cracking but didnít notice it until after I got it home. If I remember right they blamed it on the new barrels being over tightened. I would guess the rifle had been fired like that for years but the seller offered an exchange on for the WRA that ended up being 100% Winchester so I took him up on it
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 07-02-2018, 08:33 PM
ceresco ceresco is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 7,278
Default

The cracks are often very difficult to see. I am sure that many 17s are being used with cracks and owners completely oblivous. Interesting subject. Good Shooting. ..
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 07-02-2018, 09:11 PM
chuckindenver chuckindenver is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 2,592
Default

ive seen more Winchesters with cracks then any other,
all three makers used the same steel from the same steel supplier,
Midvale steel .
what I do to find a crack .
get some lighter fluid. {with the rifle out of the stock}
pour fluid all over the action, wipe it off with a cloth, cracks will show up then for a short time,
usually what cracks them,
someone using the wrong tools, or the right tools the wrong way to remove a barrel,
they are strong but very easy to crush a 17 and 14 receiver ring..
every crack iv seen has been in the same place,
heres what I think happens.
the action wrench used for these is flat on the bottom. and V shaped on the top side and are bolted together, on the inside of the V there is a step, that step matches up with the step on the right side of the action just below the serial, when the put that wrench on, the didn't notice the step, or had no idea what it was for, and just stuck it on,and tightened the bolts,, as soon as the wrenched down on the bolts or put pressure on the handle it cracked it..

Last edited by chuckindenver; 07-02-2018 at 09:15 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 07-02-2018, 09:18 PM
chuckindenver chuckindenver is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 2,592
Default

as to how safe? well, may go for years with no problems...all It takes is once,..a simple case head failure, with a cone breach,
you have a 57,000 PSI bomb 10 inches from your face,,
gotta keep that money maker clean and pretty.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 07-05-2018, 05:53 AM
98Charlie 98Charlie is online now
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: WI
Posts: 360
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by chuckindenver View Post
ive seen more Winchesters with cracks then any other,
all three makers used the same steel from the same steel supplier,
Midvale steel .
what I do to find a crack .
get some lighter fluid. {with the rifle out of the stock}
pour fluid all over the action, wipe it off with a cloth, cracks will show up then for a short time,
usually what cracks them,
someone using the wrong tools, or the right tools the wrong way to remove a barrel,
they are strong but very easy to crush a 17 and 14 receiver ring..
every crack iv seen has been in the same place,
heres what I think happens.
the action wrench used for these is flat on the bottom. and V shaped on the top side and are bolted together, on the inside of the V there is a step, that step matches up with the step on the right side of the action just below the serial, when the put that wrench on, the didn't notice the step, or had no idea what it was for, and just stuck it on,and tightened the bolts,, as soon as the wrenched down on the bolts or put pressure on the handle it cracked it..
Thanks Chuckin Denver. Very interesting. I would think that it cracked either upon removal of the old barrel, or installing the new one. I've read that these M1917 barrels are among the hardest to remove.

I had my local smith install a new Criterion barrel on one of my '17's that had the muzzle counter-bored. Well, knowing how hard these old barrels are to remove, I put the rifle on my work bench with the bolt removed. I put a bunch of Kroil in the receiver breech to let it soak in. 24 hours later, I turned the rifle 90 degrees and applied more Kroil. And again, let it soak in for 24 hours, then turned 90 degrees and more Kroil. I did this for a full 360 degrees, and then one more turn at 90 degrees with more Kroil for good measure. Well my smith said that was the easiest M1917 barrel he ever removed. The threads were wet alll the way through with Kroil. Great stuff. You need to be patient to give it time to work, which is not normally one of my character traits. I usually apply and start cranking right away...
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 07-05-2018, 12:14 PM
chuckindenver chuckindenver is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 2,592
Default

iv had them just fall loose before. but then, have me hanging off the cheater pipe with a 36 inch pipe wrench as well.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
eddystone, m1917

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:51 AM.