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  #41  
Old 10-08-2017, 06:56 PM
Born1928 Born1928 is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 53
Default 1000 yards

I am probably one of the more senior posters on this site as my user name would indicate. I went through basic training at Fort Bragg in early 1947 and along with all our other gear I was issued an M1, as was every other recruit. To say it was a thrill for this farm boy of 18 is a real understatement. We were "married" to that M1, when not on our shoulder it was kept under lock and key on a ring rack in the center of our barracks floor. Of course we all anticipated going to the range and firing our M1s for the first time. At that time our drill and other instructors were mostly WWII vets and knew what the M1 was all about. A recruit did not screw up on the firing range. Minor infractions resulted in numerous push-ups. Now as to the 1000 yard firing. My memory fades but I don't think our targets were more than 500 yards. I could be wrong about that and perhaps there may be an old timer on this site that could verify what distances were used. Perhaps it was 1000 yards because on occasion a red flag was seen above the target which indicated the shooter had missed the entire target. The red flag was affectionately called "Maggie's drawers"! I am proud to say i earned a expert marksmanship badge firing the M1, but those of us who received that award were accused of having a buddy pulling targets using an "M1 pencil" to falsely mark the targets. I have one CMP certified M1, SA serial number indicating an Oct 1944 date of manufacture. It's a wall hanger now for the most part but I have promised some young men I know a chance to fire it. Enjoy this site even though I don't post much.
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  #42  
Old 10-08-2017, 09:12 PM
echo6mike echo6mike is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Maryland, too close to DC
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Originally Posted by Born1928 View Post
I am probably one of the more senior posters on this site as my user name would indicate. I went through basic training at Fort Bragg in early 1947 and along with all our other gear I was issued an M1, as was every other recruit. To say it was a thrill for this farm boy of 18 is a real understatement. We were "married" to that M1, when not on our shoulder it was kept under lock and key on a ring rack in the center of our barracks floor. Of course we all anticipated going to the range and firing our M1s for the first time. At that time our drill and other instructors were mostly WWII vets and knew what the M1 was all about. A recruit did not screw up on the firing range. Minor infractions resulted in numerous push-ups. Now as to the 1000 yard firing. My memory fades but I don't think our targets were more than 500 yards. I could be wrong about that and perhaps there may be an old timer on this site that could verify what distances were used. Perhaps it was 1000 yards because on occasion a red flag was seen above the target which indicated the shooter had missed the entire target. The red flag was affectionately called "Maggie's drawers"! I am proud to say i earned a expert marksmanship badge firing the M1, but those of us who received that award were accused of having a buddy pulling targets using an "M1 pencil" to falsely mark the targets. I have one CMP certified M1, SA serial number indicating an Oct 1944 date of manufacture. It's a wall hanger now for the most part but I have promised some young men I know a chance to fire it. Enjoy this site even though I don't post much.

Sounds like Parris Island? I’ve only heard of Maggie’s Drawers from other Marines.

If so, then glad to have you aboard, brother! I think you count as Old Corps, so Semper Fi, mac!

Ssgt M


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  #43  
Old 10-10-2017, 01:33 AM
Gewehr43 Gewehr43 is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Denver, CO
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Originally Posted by Born1928 View Post
I am probably one of the more senior posters on this site as my user name would indicate. I went through basic training at Fort Bragg in early 1947 and along with all our other gear I was issued an M1, as was every other recruit. To say it was a thrill for this farm boy of 18 is a real understatement. We were "married" to that M1, when not on our shoulder it was kept under lock and key on a ring rack in the center of our barracks floor. Of course we all anticipated going to the range and firing our M1s for the first time. At that time our drill and other instructors were mostly WWII vets and knew what the M1 was all about. A recruit did not screw up on the firing range. Minor infractions resulted in numerous push-ups. Now as to the 1000 yard firing. My memory fades but I don't think our targets were more than 500 yards. I could be wrong about that and perhaps there may be an old timer on this site that could verify what distances were used. Perhaps it was 1000 yards because on occasion a red flag was seen above the target which indicated the shooter had missed the entire target. The red flag was affectionately called "Maggie's drawers"! I am proud to say i earned a expert marksmanship badge firing the M1, but those of us who received that award were accused of having a buddy pulling targets using an "M1 pencil" to falsely mark the targets. I have one CMP certified M1, SA serial number indicating an Oct 1944 date of manufacture. It's a wall hanger now for the most part but I have promised some young men I know a chance to fire it. Enjoy this site even though I don't post much.
You may not have shot at a 1000yds..........it depends on when the course of fire changed. I believe the 1000yd portion was used up to WW2. But during and after the qual courses were only out to 500yds.

But I could be wrong...............
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  #44  
Old 10-10-2017, 05:59 AM
nf1e nf1e is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 1,382
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Originally Posted by Born1928 View Post
I am probably one of the more senior posters on this site as my user name would indicate. I went through basic training at Fort Bragg in early 1947 and along with all our other gear I was issued an M1, as was every other recruit. To say it was a thrill for this farm boy of 18 is a real understatement. We were "married" to that M1, when not on our shoulder it was kept under lock and key on a ring rack in the center of our barracks floor. Of course we all anticipated going to the range and firing our M1s for the first time. At that time our drill and other instructors were mostly WWII vets and knew what the M1 was all about. A recruit did not screw up on the firing range. Minor infractions resulted in numerous push-ups. Now as to the 1000 yard firing. My memory fades but I don't think our targets were more than 500 yards. I could be wrong about that and perhaps there may be an old timer on this site that could verify what distances were used. Perhaps it was 1000 yards because on occasion a red flag was seen above the target which indicated the shooter had missed the entire target. The red flag was affectionately called "Maggie's drawers"! I am proud to say i earned a expert marksmanship badge firing the M1, but those of us who received that award were accused of having a buddy pulling targets using an "M1 pencil" to falsely mark the targets. I have one CMP certified M1, SA serial number indicating an Oct 1944 date of manufacture. It's a wall hanger now for the most part but I have promised some young men I know a chance to fire it. Enjoy this site even though I don't post much.
You have 20 years on me. The Maggie's Drawers got my attention too.
M14 was my boot camp weapon in 1966 and M1 at ITR. 500 was the range we qualified on.

Semper Fi
Art
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  #45  
Old 10-10-2017, 01:31 PM
Ted Brown Ted Brown is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Jacksonville, OR
Posts: 363
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Maggie's Drawers goes back a long ways. Even before I was involved with shooting sports which started me off in 1962. At that time the indication of a shot that missed was waving a red disk, instead of a flag, across the target face and we still called it Maggie's Drawers. That was in the days of the old 5V target. When we changed to the 10X target the system was changed to the miss indicated by the disk at the top center. The new system, now in use, still throws me off.
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  #46  
Old 10-10-2017, 02:03 PM
JimF JimF is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 702
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. . . . .The new system, now in use, still throws me off.
Ted . . . .
Apparently you and I started in high power about the same time . . . .

It was about 1957/58 for me.

I never competed under the new scoring system . . .in fact, I think I'd be mighty confused by it!!

For me, the older system worked just fine (misses flagged in the top-center . . .x's in the lower-left).

Any idea WHY the new system was initiated? (Why did they "fix" perfect?)
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