Go Back   CMP Forums > CMP Competitions > 3-Position Air Rifle > Competitors Corner
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-10-2014, 11:59 PM
CMPMikeD CMPMikeD is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 214
Default What's Your Style?: Preparation Period

I've been shooting for quite a few years and I've always noticed different routines and techniques that are out there. If you have ever been to a CMP Summer Camp then you may have seen the infamous examples that Olympian Dan Durben uses during his mental training class. 3-time Olympic medalist Matthew Emmons, sitting on the firing line at the Olympic Training Center meditating (or at least staring at something on the floor ). Then he shows former World Record holder and 2002 Air Rifle World Champion Jason Parker who is already suited up and dry firing while other shooters are still unpacking their equipment. There is no clear advantage. Matt and Jason put their shooting suits on one piece at a time just like everyone else, they just show up focused on their routine.

After being on the road for a few days and working two different competitions, I have been paying particular attention to pre-match routines. I'm really trying to recon ideas and information that I see issues with for future clinics or even blogs like this. There is generally one of three trends prior to the start of prep & sighting period.

1. The 30-minute "Welcome" to the match is when you're allowed to move your equipment to the line. There is really nothing to this, but I feel like most of you younger shooters are wasting valuable time during this stage. If you do not have an opportunity to get dressed prior to this announcement, then getting dressed and unpacking all of your equipment is what you do as soon as possible. From that point, maybe a word of encouragement to your teammates, and then you're in your chair waiting for the next command. All too often, I see shooters not taking advantage of filling air, ensuring you have enough pellets ready, water to drink, etc. This is your most valuable time, be ready.

2. Five minutes before prep & sighters, the range officer will say "shooters to the line". You are now officially allowed to pick up your gun and begin dry firing (without discharging air). This is important because it allows you to find your natural point of aim without having to use up valuable sighting time. You NEVER know when your sights will get bumped or be off for some unknown reason so maximizing your sighting time is important. Plus, I personally teach younger shooters to spend as much time as needed/possible to find natural point of aim, because if it isn't right, you won't shoot as well as you should.

3. Prep & Sighters usually begin 10 minutes prior to the start of the relay (3-Position Air Rifle) or 15 minutes prior (40/60 shot standing). The biggest thing I see in any sighting stage during 3-position air rifle is that shooters get sighted in, and then break position and go back to their chairs and wait until sighters are over. If you aren't going to use the entire time limit, at least wait a few minutes before starting, that way when you do get sighted in, you don't break position before you begin record fire. It is imperative that your position is as comfortable and naturally aiming at the target as possible. If you walk away from that, you will have to spend time searching for that ideal position again when you don't have to.

So, now that I've shared what I've seen.........

What's your pre-match routine? (within an hour of the first record shot)

CMP 10x
-Mike D

Follow us on Twitter: @cmpsouthrange
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/CMPSouthRange
Google+: CMP South
Join the CMP Forum: http://forums.thecmp.org/forumdisplay.php?f=104
Email us with questions, concerns, ideas: [email protected]

Last edited by CMPMikeD; 04-11-2014 at 12:07 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-31-2015, 10:00 PM
hi-revr hi-revr is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Missouri
Posts: 405
Default

I now have two seasons of vintage matches and one shooting Service Rifle. Season three will include my first air rifle matches. There are more things in common with the three disciplines than not. My love for M-1's is what started my competitive shooting. I'll take your idea a step further. Match prep starts (at least) the day before.

I made a point to observe all the other shooters in my first few matches. I knew one thing and that was I knew virtually nothing. To this day I watch what others do when I'm not shooting. My routine starts the day before the match. I get my cooler, drinks, and other essentials staged the night before. If I did not shoot the day before I make sure my practice is done early that evening and all rifles, ammo, equipment checked and loaded in the truck if home, staged if in a hotel. I want time to wind down and get to bed early. I learned if I don't get all this done I have a difficult time sleeping.

Match day at a range like Perry.......Arrive at firing line for check in early. The first thing I do is feel around my entire firing point looking for the best spot for standing. Fast foreword to match time. glasses, ear plugs, muffs, hat, shooting jacket all on back at ready line. shooting mat unrolled, ammo in cart already checked and ready. The point is I do everything I can before preprep to maximize the time I will have to establish NPA, then dry fire, then relax my eyes. This is most important in standing. Especially when on an outdoor grass firing line. When on an uneven firing line it can be very difficult to get comfortable. I find it more important to get a good NPA and feel comfortable with my feet than to dry fire several times. It isn't unusual for me to dry fire only 3-4 times and if good and comfortable I may use the last minute or so to concentrate on deep breaths to slow my heart rate.

The common themes to my match prep are......eliminate any possible distractions and prepare every piece of equipment. Ultimately this gives me confidence and allows me to get deep in the zone when on the firing line. The regulars at my local matches know I wear plugs and muffs so I don't hear chitchat. Once in match mode I tune everyone out. I stopped wearing my electronic muffs when I shoot, only when scoring.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-03-2015, 10:00 AM
CMPMikeD CMPMikeD is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 214
Default

hi-revr, thank you for your post! I am cross-posting this to our facebook page.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-03-2015, 03:55 PM
hi-revr hi-revr is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Missouri
Posts: 405
Default

I am not a facebook junkie but understand it may be a key resource for the air gun audience. I read your post and decided to look for the facebook page. I went to the new CMP website and looked at the air gun page. I don't see it. http://thecmp.org/air/ I have no doubt you will post a link to the FB page but there should be a link on that main page, especially if it is air gun specific.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-14-2015, 04:55 PM
Bravo1125 Bravo1125 is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Midland MI
Posts: 11
Default

hi-revr, that is a great explanation of your pre-competition routine! I never thought about relaxing your eyes. This is another great piece of advice on how to get into the zone and I need all the help I can get.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-14-2015, 09:13 PM
CMPMikeD CMPMikeD is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 214
Default

http://thecmp.org/air/cmp-marksmanship-centers/

The Facebook links are next to the competition center headings
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-15-2015, 07:30 PM
John McCarter John McCarter is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Edmond, OK
Posts: 97
Thumbs up

Hirever

+1
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-15-2015, 10:00 PM
CMPMikeD CMPMikeD is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 214
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John McCarter View Post
Hirever

+1
Surely you and bravo have something we could all benefit from!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-16-2015, 08:10 AM
alpha sierra alpha sierra is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Ohio
Posts: 167
Default

hi-revr, great post. I found myself agreeing with virtually everything in it, as I try to do the same exact things.

I like organization and I like to have my stuff in the stool neatly organized and always in the same place so that nothing is forgotten. I put as many things as I can in containers so that there is less loose stuff floating around in there. I also use a checklist to make sure everything I need is in the cart.

I have enough magazines to have all the rapid fire ammo loaded up for an 80 round match. So that's one less thing to do while on the line the next day.

Once everything is packed and checked, it goes in the car the night before: one less chance to forget something in the morning.

My match day preps are similar to yours with a focus on being ahead of schedule.

I also concur with spending as much time as it takes to get NPA perfect for standing. Perfect NPA is one of the secrets to a good standing score. I dry fire only to confirm NPA once I think I have it. Once that's done, my feet do not move until the stage is over. I don't sit down unless there is a significant delay, and if I do sit, my cart is already behind me so that my feet do not need to move for me to sit.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-16-2015, 02:08 PM
CMPMikeD CMPMikeD is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 214
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by alpha sierra View Post
hi-revr, great post. I found myself agreeing with virtually everything in it, as I try to do the same exact things.

I like organization and I like to have my stuff in the stool neatly organized and always in the same place so that nothing is forgotten. I put as many things as I can in containers so that there is less loose stuff floating around in there. I also use a checklist to make sure everything I need is in the cart.

I have enough magazines to have all the rapid fire ammo loaded up for an 80 round match. So that's one less thing to do while on the line the next day.

Once everything is packed and checked, it goes in the car the night before: one less chance to forget something in the morning.

My match day preps are similar to yours with a focus on being ahead of schedule.

I also concur with spending as much time as it takes to get NPA perfect for standing. Perfect NPA is one of the secrets to a good standing score. I dry fire only to confirm NPA once I think I have it. Once that's done, my feet do not move until the stage is over. I don't sit down unless there is a significant delay, and if I do sit, my cart is already behind me so that my feet do not need to move for me to sit.


I will be shooting my first highpower match in Oklahoma. I have nothing except my jacket, gun and ammo...

What are the remaining basics one would need to shoot a Garand match? What is ideal? What are extra perks?

Maybe we should make a Competitor's Corner sub-forum in one of the highpower forums.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
3-position air rifle, cmp, jason parker, matt emmons, mental training

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:31 AM.