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  #11  
Old 04-13-2015, 09:40 PM
Greg_D Greg_D is offline
 
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Here's a good video explaining how to configure the sling with the keepers together. So many videos show the keepers on different parts of the sling.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kmemFfZO-E0
Why are there so many videos that show one keeper on the upper strap and one on the lower. Is this ever correct like for parades or such?

Last edited by Greg_D; 04-13-2015 at 09:48 PM.
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  #12  
Old 04-13-2015, 09:44 PM
Greg_D Greg_D is offline
 
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Do the keepers ever pull up over the 3 thickness' of leather or do you always loop the strap connected to the forward swivel back on itself?
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  #13  
Old 04-14-2015, 09:31 PM
Greg Ficklin Greg Ficklin is offline
 
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The folded part is called the "feed end". I guess it is possible to have keepers so worn out that they could get past the dog, but I have never seen it. The method of sling configuration in this thread is the same in Dennis's video. It is the same used by the USMC rifle team, and instructed by Ken Roxburgh in the Remington Clinic. There are other configurations but this one just works. It's fast, and stays put when you use it correctly. The part about sling discipline, and leaving the short end on the rifle with the small loop is taken directly from Rox's clinic. It really helps when required to stand for rapid fire. People that don't do this always fuss around with the short end not knowing what to do with it.
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  #14  
Old 04-26-2015, 09:23 AM
Greg Ficklin Greg Ficklin is offline
 
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Just looking at it, I would say that it is barely over 2 ft because of the mag pouches. The regulation firing point dimension is 10 ft, but some clubs use less. My club's is 5 ft , which makes it very tight with a full line. You need your cart for all stages of fire, because that is where your stuff is. You need your rag, ammo, clock, and a strategically placed cart will block the sun in prone. A cart is not required at all, but it centralizes and mobilizes your organization. It is indispensable.
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  #15  
Old 08-01-2015, 12:34 AM
Big_Red Big_Red is offline
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To piggy-back on Greg's first thread above, I've broken out and moved the equipment-specific posts into this thread and made it a sticky as well since it contains just as valuable information relevant to competitive shooting equipment.

Again, many thanks to Greg for taking the time to post this, as well as others who have contributed.
As with the other thread, have discussed with Greg and he welcomes, even encourages other HMs, DRs, instructors and competitors to contribute for the greater good of the sport.
Good shooting!
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  #16  
Old 01-03-2016, 07:10 PM
M1Jeff M1Jeff is offline
 
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Hey Greg, how about an overview of that Camel Back pit bag you mentioned? Half of our day is in the pits...
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  #17  
Old 01-10-2016, 09:50 PM
Greg Ficklin Greg Ficklin is offline
 
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A lot of people in the XTC game never pull targets in the pits until they get to a full course event like EIC leg matches, Eastern Games, or Nationals. It only takes one day in the pits to see that some are more prepared, and comfortable while they are down there. The goal is to be prepared and comfortable while enduring the work. I have to admit that I am often less fortified than most who have bag lunches, nabs, "standups", and Gatorade in the pits. Having a pit bag with a smorgasbord of pougey bait, safety glasses, extra hearing protection, a length of rope or strap to aid in pulling the frame, and a chair can make the experience a lot more pleasurable. I am often amazed at what people bring to the pits. The type of personality that makes lists of items they may possibly need like a mini camping trip far from civilization, and the minimalist are the two extremes. My attempt at trying to be like the others led me to getting a Camel Back knock-off from a gun show. These back packs entered military service long after I was gone, replacing the canteen and cup from days gone by. They hold more water than you care to drink in half a day, and keep it cool too.
It's like a man purse with a straw. Every trip to the pits gives you an idea of something you wish you had thought of. When you see what others have pulled out when the range is shut down because of a boat in the impact area, you get a little jealous saying to yourself "Man those standups sure look good".
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  #18  
Old 03-05-2016, 10:43 PM
Greg Ficklin Greg Ficklin is offline
 
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Hey gang,
It's been a while since my last installment. I thought I had pretty much covered all I wanted to say to get people going, but a personal IM on a rifle purchase question has me wanting cover something I had left out.
The subject of triggers.

Next to ammo, and the new scope debates, the choice of triggers is way high on the list as the most important modification you can make on your competition rigs. To know what we need in our triggers we must first know the rules; What they say, and sometimes just as important, what they don't say.
Weather it's the "as issued" games matches, or full blown XTC Service Rifle, when it comes to M1's, or AR-15's the rule is that they must pick up no less than 4.5#. They don't need to elaborate anymore on it, and for our sakes, we are glad they don't. A trigger job isn't considered a NM modification when it comes to "as issued" M1's so long as you have USGI parts. Brand new Garands like the CMP specials, or trigger groups made from in the wrap N.O.S. parts can be terrible when it comes to total weight needed to get the shot out in standing Now if you remember my post on the standing position, second stage trigger weight is the same as time. Enough time to turn blue, lose focus with your eyes, and lose that great sight picture before the hammer finally falls, or be so hard that you push shots to make them go. No other characteristic of your competition rifle has more effect on your standing scores, and potential than the trigger.
The M1 Trigger: While I'm not going to describe how to do a trigger job in detail, I do want you to look at your triggers, weigh them, and know how they work. It is a testament to the genius of J.C. Garand, and is still the same mechanics used in the AR-15 triggers used today from RRA, Armalite, and Geissele. More on the Geissele later.
Reducing sear engagement is the key to reducing second stage weight in the Garand. This is done by increasing the distance the trigger moves in the first stage before a definite "stop". This has to be done by stoning the hammer hooks making them slightly shorter. Apart from making the M1 trigger slick and not gritty by polishing and lubing moving parts, there nothing else you can do, and should be done by qualified M1 trigger gurus. You could study up on it yourself, and become one, but my advise to you is to not try to get down to the magic 4.5 minimum. The M1 recoils a lot, and you need a little bit of creep to keep it from doubling. You don't have to necessarily feel it, but it has to be there
So what is "creep" anyway ? Well it is nothing more than second stage movement before the hammer falls. or excessive sear engagement.It has nothing to do with the first stage, and I cringe when I hear someone say they have creep in their first stage. The first stage can be gritty, it can feel like a gravel road, but it can't have creep. Some guns are notorious for creepy triggers. The 1903 Springfield, and US model 1917 come to mind, as well as cheap spring piston airguns, and the Daisy Red Ryder. But the Red Ryder's creep is more like a long roll, and very satisfying. I will add that a "roll" is creep. It's often desired by pistol shooters, and some riflemen when the M1/M14 was king. Roll is desirable, or acceptable creep.
Next we have Over Travel. OT is trigger movement after the hammer has released. It is often associated with small-bore, and match rifles, and not so much with service rifles. We just aren't so concerned with it because all military rifle have gobs of it, and we think it's just normal. Shoot a Remington 40X rim fire, and you will know what no OT feels like. It feels weird because the trigger seems like it doesn't move at all.
Now that we have the terminology, and language of trigger talk out of the way, you can now tell your trigger guru exactly what you want your trigger to do, which brings me to the Geissele. Geissele makes lots of triggers, but the one we want to use is the Hi-Speed National Match - Service Rifle Trigger. These things are the bees knees, and the gold standard that has been proven by the USMC rifle team, AMU, and too many national records to list. Their customer service is beyond reproach, and have the reputation of replacing any trigger that eventually breaks, even after tens of thousands of rounds fired. In our game they just don't get any better than Geissele Automatics.
So what makes them so great ? Remember the rules, and what they didn't say? They didn't say where the weight has to be, only that it has to pick up a minimum of 4.5#. This is the key, and what makes the SR trigger a SR trigger. The basic mechanics is just like the M1, but Geissele allows you to be a trigger guru armed with little Allen wrenches that adjust sear engagement independently from second stage weight, and a first stage that is a super smooth 3 to 4 pounds. This allows the second stage to be crisp and light 2# and under. In short it allows you to shoot a light trigger that still makes weight for service rifle because most of it is free on the front end ! The springy first stage doesn't add time to the shot so we don't care how heavy it is. It makes the rules, and leaves us with the sweet potential to clean the standing slow fire stage. The point/dollar potential, forever service life, lifetime replacement if it ever breaks, makes them worth every penny.
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  #19  
Old 10-03-2016, 07:21 PM
mr.tickle mr.tickle is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Ficklin View Post
The sling

Before we get into the positions we have to look at the sling an how to use it.
Why do we use a sling? What kind of sling? How to put it on correctly. I'll answer these, and put some pictures to make it as clear as possible because the sling is your best friend.

The sling has two purposes, well really three, but for now it's two.
1) Provides maximum stability for the rifle in firing.
2) Instills confidence in the shooter.

The military learned long ago that to be effective in combat shooting, one must first be competent in fundamental marksmanship, and fundamental marksmanship starts with correctly using the sling.
There are lots of different slings, but for this discussion we will only cover the two types that are usually found on service rifles; The 1907 style loop sling, and the web sling.
I recommend the 1907 style leather sling made by Ron Brown, Les Tam, John Weller, or Turner slings. All of these are made with top quality leather that will last a long time. Use a sling that is 54" long.

The 1907 sling has a long piece with a "dog" or "frog" riveted to the end, two keepers, and a short side that has a D ring and another "dog" or "frog". The leather can be up to 1-1/4 inches wide, and up to 3/16 inch thick per the rulebook. It can have no more than two keepers.
How much of a detriment am I in if have a USGI web sling? I had gotten it because of cost but would eventually like to save up for 1907 sling.
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  #20  
Old 10-03-2016, 08:51 PM
Craftsman Craftsman is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr.tickle View Post
How much of a detriment am I in if have a USGI web sling? I had gotten it because of cost but would eventually like to save up for 1907 sling.
If you are fortunate enough someday to be in one of Mr. Gary Anderson's CMP/GSM clinics, he will be instructing you on how to use the GI web sling, not the 1907 leather sling. Nothing wrong with a web sling, especially when starting out, they're easy to get in and out of and adjust, and they do the job of helping support the rifle with your bones just fine. I used a NOS 1950's USGI web sling the first couple of years when I began shooting in Garand matches. Today I do prefer a Ron Brown leather sling, but I'd still use a web sling if need be, or to mix things up a bit!
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