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  #11  
Old 06-08-2016, 08:30 PM
SDTkeld SDTkeld is offline
 
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Built under license. I guess we could have kept using the Allison engine to keep it All-American, because that was working so well. Don't worry, we made the best radial engines. See P-47, F6F, F4U, B-29 and on and on.
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  #12  
Old 06-08-2016, 08:46 PM
Saluki Saluki is offline
 
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The US companies had quite the time figuring out how to make many of the high tolerance items that went into aircraft and other like items. In fact quality control was quite the bugaboo during the war.
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  #13  
Old 06-08-2016, 10:32 PM
jmm jmm is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDTkeld View Post
Built under license. I guess we could have kept using the Allison engine to keep it All-American, because that was working so well. Don't worry, we made the best radial engines. See P-47, F6F, F4U, B-29 and on and on.
Actually the engines on the B-29 were a problem that fully never got solved, and almost canceled the program. Even when the engine was used in the 1950's, they continued to fail and bring down trans-oceanic flights.
The British made almost no changes to the Merlin engine after 1941, all development work and improvements were conducted by Packard and Ford U.K. The engines were greatly simplified, improved, and more durable. Materials in the bearings and valve seats were improved, and we gave them 110 octane fuel to use, as well as Ethylene Glycol for cooling.
My grandfather's company made parts for both Curtiss-Wright and Pratt & Whitney during the war, but Dad was very proud of the book he had that detailed the American improvements to the Merlin engine. I wonder where that went when he died?
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  #14  
Old 06-08-2016, 10:37 PM
jmm jmm is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Saluki View Post
The US companies had quite the time figuring out how to make many of the high tolerance items that went into aircraft and other like items. In fact quality control was quite the bugaboo during the war.
Actually Ford and Packard reduced the tolerances to match the standards they used for their car engine production.
http://www.tested.com/art/makers/492...lt-powerhouse/

While Rolls-Royce’s manufacturing techniques churned out very high quality engines, they simply didn’t jibe with Packard’s way of doing things (or Ford in Manchester for that matter). In his book “Not Much of An Engineer”, Rolls-Royce engineer Sir Stanley Hooker recalls his introduction to the matter with Ford:

“One day their Chief Engineer appeared in Lovesey’s office, which I was then sharing, and said, ‘You know, we can’t make the Merlin to these drawings.’

I replied loftily, ‘I suppose that is because the drawing tolerances are too difficult for you, and you can’t achieve the accuracy.’

‘On the contrary’ he replied, ‘the tolerances are far too wide for us.’ We make motor cars far more accurately than this. Every part on our car engines has to be interchangeable with the same part on any other engine, and hence all parts have to be made with extreme accuracy, far closer than you use. That is the only way we can achieve mass-production.’”
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  #15  
Old 06-09-2016, 07:22 AM
DaveHH DaveHH is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J.R.2009 View Post
OK, if you say so. LOL, just don't tell the Brits that!! I think they will think their planes were just as well made.
Have you ever looked at a Spit up close? I mean touching close? There are pieces of sheetmetal with wooden blocks behind them to hold the parts together. The sheet metal work is poor compared to US standards. I'm talking about wartime Spits not late ones that have been cleaned up. Great aircraft by the way.
My father built P38s during WW2 and he told me that the company brought in examples of German, Brit and Japanese aircraft for the employees to look at. His opinions were revealing. The Japanese parts were well made and finished (This was still early) but he said that the material was like paper. You could almost tear it like paper. The German stuff was OK, but he said that they lacked good die casting, making parts with laminated sheet metal as opposed to a nice die cast part. They also didn't seem to care about incompatible metals either. I spent quite a bit of time at Duxford in England looking up close at war made aircraft and vehicles. The museums over there are stunning. At the Imperial War Museum in London, you can touch a German Jagdpanther (could be a Panzer IV stug), It is just a huge sheet of armor plate arc welded to more plates to form a body. Cobby as can be.
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  #16  
Old 06-09-2016, 11:36 AM
J.R.2009 J.R.2009 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveHH View Post
Have you ever looked at a Spit up close? I mean touching close? There are pieces of sheetmetal with wooden blocks behind them to hold the parts together. The sheet metal work is poor compared to US standards. I'm talking about wartime Spits not late ones that have been cleaned up. Great aircraft by the way.
My father built P38s during WW2 and he told me that the company brought in examples of German, Brit and Japanese aircraft for the employees to look at. His opinions were revealing. The Japanese parts were well made and finished (This was still early) but he said that the material was like paper. You could almost tear it like paper. The German stuff was OK, but he said that they lacked good die casting, making parts with laminated sheet metal as opposed to a nice die cast part. They also didn't seem to care about incompatible metals either. I spent quite a bit of time at Duxford in England looking up close at war made aircraft and vehicles. The museums over there are stunning. At the Imperial War Museum in London, you can touch a German Jagdpanther (could be a Panzer IV stug), It is just a huge sheet of armor plate arc welded to more plates to form a body. Cobby as can be.
Dave, I know all that. Just poking at ya!
I use to be amazed at how few rounds it took to splash a Japanese Zero; looking at gun camera footage. I know our planes, tanks, etc. were, for the most part, of much higher quality than any other country.
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  #17  
Old 06-09-2016, 11:37 AM
J.R.2009 J.R.2009 is offline
 
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Next plane, story and pics coming soon. HU-16 Albatross.
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  #18  
Old 06-09-2016, 06:20 PM
SDTkeld SDTkeld is offline
 
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And also the M18 Hellcat, which was powered by a radial engine. Good luck getting one to fly though.
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  #19  
Old 06-09-2016, 07:08 PM
Thumper Thumper is offline
 
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I took all my flight training in a At-6 that was built I think it was 1944

Ah she was slow, but gentle and smooth, an easy study.
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  #20  
Old 06-10-2016, 09:14 AM
J.R.2009 J.R.2009 is offline
 
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Part 2.

" The second aircraft is a Grumman HU-16 Albatross and its addition to the fleet generated hundreds of memorable flight hours. We bought it over 20 years ago in the dead of winter, February 1994, from a restoration shop out in California that specialized in this type aircraft. We decided to leave it out there for a full mechanical restoration, mainly because we couldn’t fit it in any of the hangers we had at that time and working outside in a Midwestern winter was not a pleasant thought. We also sent our painter out there to finish the exterior painting before ferrying it back to Minnesota where we planned to do a complete interior restoration. The reason for the rush was that the owner wanted to enter it in the first big national spring Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) airshow in Lakeland FL in early April, meaning our crew of 8 mechanics would have to put in many long hours.
The museum owner firmly believed in originality, so our research experts traced all documents and learned that this aircraft was originally flown by the Coast Guard Station in Miami, FL, as aircraft #7218. Photographs were located showing it on the ramp in Miami with all of its markings visible, making it possible for us to put it back into its exact original configuration, just like all of our other Warbirds (a decision that eventually came back to bite us.).
It will be easier to use the attached pictures to give you a much better feel for what a large undertaking this was.
Pics 1 & 2: Show the plane in the warmer California sunshine getting prepped for painting.




Pics 3 & 4: Show the interior completely stripped in preparation for adding a new interior.





Pic 5: Shows the finished aircraft just prior to departure for Florida.



Pic 6: Shows our painter in Lakeland making last minutes changes, just to be sure we had exactly duplicated the Coast Guard emblem before final judging was conducted.




Pic 7: On the ramp at Lakeland, just after winning the show’s best original restoration award.


At this point the aircraft owner and his wife decided to reward the entire crew for all their hard work and announced that they would now sponsor a week long “Splash & Dash” party out in the Bahamas. The plan was simple. All we had to do was load all eleven of us on board, complete with scuba gear, file an international flight plan for the nearest point of entry, clear customs into the Bahamas, and then just wander up and down those beautiful jewel like islands.
Pics 8 & 9: Crew finally relaxing on the trip over to the islands.



Continued next page.

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Last edited by J.R.2009; 07-11-2016 at 02:07 PM.
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