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Old 09-11-2017, 04:07 PM
milprileb milprileb is offline
 
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Default When M1's were shot at 1000 yds..what bullet wt?

I am assuming they used the 173 gr bullet for 1000 yds and today a 175 grain would be okay? Did they use a Shuster gas plug or the issue one ? I ask this because I am now planning on taking a Garand beyond 600 yds and push to 800 and then 1000 yds . Unfortunately, there is no one (alive) around here that has done it and shows up at our club range days.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 09-11-2017, 04:23 PM
Det. Jason 714 Det. Jason 714 is offline
 
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I seem to remember reading it was the 173's, I do not remember anything about adjustable plugs though. I know a guy who shot comp in the chair force, I'll see if he remembers.
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Old 09-11-2017, 04:39 PM
echo6mike echo6mike is offline
 
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Don't know about the details, but I'm betting they used the standard gas plugs. Based on my Dad talking about qualifying at 1000 yards in basic training (Army, 1952) - I can't even imagine they'd be teaching recruits on anything other than bog-standard rifles with whatever issue ammo was in stock at the time.

For competition, I have no idea, but am curious to find out as I'd love to try some 100-yard shooting eventually with my own Garand.

s/f
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Old 09-11-2017, 04:47 PM
milprileb milprileb is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by echo6mike View Post
Don't know about the details, but I'm betting they used the standard gas plugs. Based on my Dad talking about qualifying at 1000 yards in basic training (Army, 1952) - I can't even imagine they'd be teaching recruits on anything other than bog-standard rifles with whatever issue ammo was in stock at the time.

For competition, I have no idea, but am curious to find out as I'd love to try some 100-yard shooting eventually with my own Garand.s/f
Well, if you live in MD... Quantico is just a short trip and I plan to do this 1000 yd shooting so stay in touch, we shoot on weekends . The ideal day is when we do a Sunday 800 / 1000 yard day. This would require you have your 600 yd dope but heck, we can swag it and get you on paper at 800 the finalize the sight settings..then press to 1000 and do the same. Just let me know if interested, I'll sponsor you to shoot with our club and as RSO, I am allowed a guest.
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  #5  
Old 09-11-2017, 05:29 PM
JoeW2111 JoeW2111 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milprileb View Post
I am assuming they used the 173 gr bullet for 1000 yds and today a 175 grain would be okay? Did they use a Shuster gas plug or the issue one ? I ask this because I am now planning on taking a Garand beyond 600 yds and push to 800 and then 1000 yds . Unfortunately, there is no one (alive) around here that has done it and shows up at our club range days.

Thanks in advance.
Prior to 1958 rifles used in National Match competition had to be "service rifle as issued". No specially manufactured parts. Things like Shuster gas screw was not available and would not have been allowed if available. For the 1957 shooting season and the 1957 National Matches the T-291 cartridge was being used and made by both Lake City and Frankford Arsenals. The ammunition used in the 1957 National Matches was all Frankford Arsenal manufacture, Lot FA-11. It was loaded with a boat-tailed bullet weighing about 173 grains, in front of 47.8 grains of IMR 4895, and a Remington # 72 Primer. Muzzle velocity runs about 2700 fps, and pressure about 44,000 lbs psi. The ranges fired in NM compitition with this ammo were 200, 300, 600 and 1000 yds

The above information is quoted from bulletin by "Headquarters, 1957 National Matches, Ordnance Office, dated 7 Aug. 1957. "Details on the .30 Match Ammunition".
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Old 09-11-2017, 06:54 PM
karls42 karls42 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeW2111 View Post
Prior to 1958 rifles used in National Match competition had to be "service rifle as issued". No specially manufactured parts. Things like Shuster gas screw was not available and would not have been allowed if available. For the 1957 shooting season and the 1957 National Matches the T-291 cartridge was being used and made by both Lake City and Frankford Arsenals. The ammunition used in the 1957 National Matches was all Frankford Arsenal manufacture, Lot FA-11. It was loaded with a boat-tailed bullet weighing about 173 grains, in front of 47.8 grains of IMR 4895, and a Remington # 72 Primer. Muzzle velocity runs about 2700 fps, and pressure about 44,000 lbs psi. The ranges fired in NM compitition with this ammo were 200, 300, 600 and 1000 yds

The above information is quoted from bulletin by "Headquarters, 1957 National Matches, Ordnance Office, dated 7 Aug. 1957. "Details on the .30 Match Ammunition".
Exactly my experience when I shot on U.S.M.C. teams in the 1960's, except the rifles had the allowable NM parts and tuning
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Old 09-11-2017, 07:46 PM
lite-box lite-box is offline
 
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M72 173 gr, Later if you handloaded Sierra 180 SMK's.
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Old 09-11-2017, 08:20 PM
Blimp60 Blimp60 is offline
 
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I have only shot 1000 yards one time. I used 168 gr Nosler CC BTHP over 46.5 gr of Varget and CCI 34 primers in HXP brass. Bullets were still supersonic and stable when they hit the target. I was using a Garandgear plug, but I don't think that I needed it.
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Old 09-11-2017, 10:02 PM
JoeW2111 JoeW2111 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karls42 View Post
Exactly my experience when I shot on U.S.M.C. teams in the 1960's, except the rifles had the allowable NM parts and tuning
Yes, between 1960 & 1963 a number of modifications were allowed.

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  #10  
Old 09-12-2017, 12:14 AM
M1 sniper M1 sniper is offline
 
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What size are the targets at 1000 yards and what's the typical accuracy? Are you just lobbing them out there for volly type fire or are there groups?
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