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  #1  
Old 09-28-2017, 03:04 PM
Carriec Carriec is offline
 
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Default 1903-A3 Cut Off

What does "no hole" mean relating to this part? I can't find the answer so imposing here.
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  #2  
Old 09-28-2017, 04:18 PM
Mike D Mike D is offline
 
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I've heard it referred as a "weep" hole. Google that. Not sure of the purpose. Maybe it helped keep that part cleaner? Ease in manufacturing?

Mike
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  #3  
Old 09-28-2017, 06:16 PM
Scout706 Scout706 is offline
 
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Try "Hatcher hole" Julian Hatcher.

Wikipedia: "Hatcher was later instrumental in developing a solution to the vexing problem of brittle metal in early M1903 receivers built by Springfield and Rock Island Arsenals. His solution to the "grenading" of receivers when shell cases failed catastrophically was to drill a gas vent hole in the left side of the receiver adjacent to the breech. This hole would allow gases escaping from a ruptured case to be exhausted safely and away from the face of the shooter. Dubbed the "Hatcher Hole", the modification was typically added to receivers at overhaul."
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  #4  
Old 09-28-2017, 06:28 PM
Mike D Mike D is offline
 
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This has nothing to do with the Hatcher hole.

To be honest, I had the safety in mind. Later Sears also had weep holes. I guess it would help keep the spring from getting clogged with dirt.

Mike
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  #5  
Old 09-28-2017, 07:29 PM
lapriester lapriester is offline
 
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Hatcher hole is in the bolt body. Has nothing to do with the cut off.
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  #6  
Old 09-28-2017, 08:41 PM
Rob257 Rob257 is offline
 
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Wink You sure..

Quote:
Originally Posted by lapriester View Post
Hatcher hole is in the bolt body. Has nothing to do with the cut off.
I thought the Hatcher Hole was on the left side of the receiver. Also believe bolts were modified to match up to the new L/S Hatcher Hole.
Agree nothing to do with the Cut Off.

Rob
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  #7  
Old 09-28-2017, 08:48 PM
Carriec Carriec is offline
 
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Location: Virginia
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Thank you for the feedback so far. I haven't had enough 03 cut offs in my hand to notice holes other than those required for plunger, spring, spindle and screw so an eBay listing I saw has my interest. If anything I might tend to follow Mike's line of reasoning with regard to weep/drainage, but I don't know where that would be.
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  #8  
Old 09-28-2017, 08:57 PM
New Jersey Devil New Jersey Devil is offline
 
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Given this is a thread about 1903 magazine cut-offs, what the hell is the point of a magazine cut-off on a combat rifle anyway?

This has always struck me as somewhat bizarre, but I dont ever see the subject covered.
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  #9  
Old 09-28-2017, 09:16 PM
Carriec Carriec is offline
 
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It's my understanding the intent was to allow controlled single round loading and firing. Basically a single shot method holding the "magazine" in reserve for magazine fire i.e. rapid fire. Again the issue of ammunition expenditure makes itself known. Same idea when the burst limit system on GI M16 variants came around. Don't have to watch too much Vietnam era footage of mag dumps on full auto over the top of a log or bag wall to wonder why the brass ever thought up such ridiculous ideas. Was a time when the idea was one at a time and make them count. Yes of course you are hanging it out.
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  #10  
Old 09-28-2017, 09:20 PM
7,62x51mm 7,62x51mm is offline
 
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cut-off for magazines were designed to hold the loaded magazines in reserve while single cartridges were loaded during slow fire

Been in use since post Civil War days (Spencer) and still thought to be an important feature on magazine rifles up to WW1

A few rifles with cut-offs

Early Lee Enfield
Turkish Model 1893 Mauser
French Lebel
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