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Old 12-08-2009, 09:07 AM
fischfam fischfam is offline
 
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Location: Central NJ
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Default HPX reloading cycles

I recently stated reloading my .30-06 ammo and was wondering how many loads I can get out of each case. I have heard from others regarding handguns and (I think) rifles that they will only last about 3 or 4 times before splitting and such. Well for my .45 ACP I have reloaded thousands so far and only saw about one or two which were split. I have a bunch of HPX which were reloaded 3 times and they all look great with no reals signs of wear. What is the most cycles you have gotten out of your .30-06 brass?
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Old 12-08-2009, 09:15 AM
ceresco ceresco is offline
 
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Thirty plus--and one test with 243win by a die manfacturer went fifty plus (FL sized full power loading cycles before the necks split. If you size your cases excessively and load hot, you will cause problems. Good Shooting.......
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Old 12-08-2009, 12:52 PM
terry_b terry_b is offline
 
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it's going to depend on how lose your chamber is. No comparison to .45. Bottleneck brass streatches with each firing and that brass you trim to get the case length back to spec has to come from somewhere. That somewhere is near the base. you can feel for the ring that is formed on the inside with a small pick.
Second issue is the neck work hardening. once again, depends on how much the neck stretches on firing. eventually it work hardens and then splits. i looked at re-annealing but decided it was too difficult to get the setup for a consistent heating/cooling. Others may have figured it out and maybe they can get you started
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Old 12-08-2009, 01:18 PM
cfullgraf cfullgraf is offline
 
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Semi-auto rifles are hard on brass both mechanically and thermally. With my AR platform rifles (long heavy barrel, crew served varminters and a service rifle match gun) I get 4 to 6 loadings before the primer pocket begins to expand too much to hold the primers.

I don't shoot my Garands very much so I have not discovered the limit yet. I do know the Garand is easier on brass than the ARs and the brass lasts longer. But, I doubt the brass will last up into the twenties and beyond for reloading. While a neck split signal the end of life for that piece of brass, there are other problems such as head separations and loose primers that you want to avoid discovering upon firing the gun.

I expect that I'll discard brass after 6 to 8 loadings, mostly for piece of mind if for no other reason.

Unlike straight wall pistol cases, you should not run the rifle brass to destruction before discarding it. At a minimum it is a real pain in the neck to have case head separate in the gun.
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Old 12-08-2009, 03:20 PM
Ericc Ericc is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fischfam View Post
I recently stated reloading my .30-06 ammo and was wondering how many loads I can get out of each case. I have heard from others regarding handguns and (I think) rifles that they will only last about 3 or 4 times before splitting and such. Well for my .45 ACP I have reloaded thousands so far and only saw about one or two which were split. I have a bunch of HPX which were reloaded 3 times and they all look great with no reals signs of wear. What is the most cycles you have gotten out of your .30-06 brass?
It really depends on your application. A bolt gun where you are sizing only the neck can have dozens of reloads per case. If you're annealing also.

My Garand destroys the brass before I reach the point of case separation. I normally don't load more then 5-6 times on brass going through the Garand.

You can use the paperclip trick too feel for the signs of impending case separation. You're looking for a ridge that forms near the base of the case. The following below shows what you're looking to find.

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/YE0A5IsR1dA&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/YE0A5IsR1dA&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

Eric
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  #6  
Old 12-09-2009, 12:29 AM
ceresco ceresco is offline
 
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destroys the brass before case separation--well of course it does. Chances are you will never see a case seperation in a 30-06. The 30-06 is an OLD cartridge. The standard operating pressure on commercial ammo is significantly lower that .223 or 308win. and M2 load levels are even more conservative. I checked cases that actually were separating and found the fired base to shoulder dimension running +.040-.050". Of course the gun was a 1919 Browning MG badly in need of an adjustment and even then, only some of the (new) caes were failing.. I looked for years for a classic head separation in a 30-06 before finding incipient separations in some badly abused cases. Much used cases (that's properly handloaded ones) from mil surp 30-06 rifles fail from split necks, damaged rims and gradually loosening primer pockets--and not before many (that's 10-20) loading cycles. Comparisons with AR15 match loads are not valid, nobody bothers to anneal case necks or check them with bent paper clips unless it's in a class for beginnng handloaders Good Shooting......
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